Jet Lag Image
Metascore
53

Mixed or average reviews - based on 28 Critics What's this?

User Score
6.8

Generally favorable reviews- based on 5 Ratings

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  • Starring: , ,
  • Summary: A romantic comedy about an encounter at the Paris airport between a world-weary businessman (Reno) and a troubled beautician (Binoche).
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 28
  2. Negative: 4 out of 28
  1. 80
    Danièle Thompson's romantic comedy is excellent fluff français, leavened with charm, wit and smart observation about the way we love now.
  2. It's a pleasure to encounter a confectionary love story in which a man and woman of age and experience discover feelings that youth, more and more, has a patent on in Hollywood.
  3. It's light and airy and, unlike the land-locked planes, runs the risk of nearly floating away into innocuous obscurity.
  4. Although far superior to recent American fare such as "Alex and Emma," the film takes actors with quirky charms and places them in a homogenized, studiolike picture. What a waste.
  5. 50
    This is the kind of movie that they show on planes -- white noise that lulls you to sleep.
  6. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    50
    As a credible love story, though, the film never leaves the runway. If you're a fan of these actors, you may want to look up Jet Lag when it comes out on video, or catch it on an Air France flight while flirting with the passenger in the next seat.
  7. 25
    An alarmingly unfunny French comedy where the two main characters are constantly yakking on a cell phone at an airport.

See all 28 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 2
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 2
  3. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. PatC.
    Apr 5, 2006
    9
    A romantic comedy for those into travel. Sometimes one has to get on a plane to get grounded. Simple and elegant, a light but splendid little love story. I have to go all the way back to My Man Godfrey to recall a movie of the genre as lean and direct. However, the cell phone as the principal prop evidently never needs recharging, and is as improbable as a John Wayne six-gun that shoots into next week without reloading. Expand

See all 2 User Reviews