Metascore
82

Universal acclaim - based on 26 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 26
  2. Negative: 0 out of 26
  1. Reviewed by: Ann Hornaday
    Dec 8, 2011
    100
    Le Havre is a playful parable that conveys profound truths about compassion, humility and sacrifice. It offers proof that miracles do happen - especially in Kaurismaki's lyrically hardscrabble neighborhood.
  2. 100
    Le Havre, offers the director's usual humour, pitch-perfect acting and compassionate message, with a Gallic twist that should win new converts.
  3. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Nov 2, 2011
    100
    This movie is as lovable as a silent comedy, which it could have been.
  4. Reviewed by: Lisa Schwarzbaum
    Nov 2, 2011
    100
    The setting is somewhere between a post-WWII Brigadoon and the environs of Marcel Carn classic "Children of Paradise," but the story is as timely as this morning's news from Europe.
  5. Reviewed by: Eric Kohn
    Oct 17, 2011
    91
    With its bouncy soundtrack, deadpan humor and good-natured disposition, Finnish director Aki Kaurismaki's Le Havre is an endearing affair.
  6. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    Oct 21, 2011
    90
    For the right kind of film buff, it's absolutely one of the most enjoyable pictures of the year - and if you've never heard of the guy before, I can't imagine a better place to start.
  7. Reviewed by: Kenneth Turan
    Oct 21, 2011
    90
    Buster Keaton isn't dead, he's alive and well in Finland, where under a new identity he pursues his own particular brand of deadpan absurdism to wonderful effect. If the name Aki Kaurismäki doesn't mean anything to you, it should, and Le Havre may be the film to make it happen.
  8. Reviewed by: Stephanie Zacharek
    Oct 21, 2011
    90
    Le Havre proceeds from the usual Kaurismäkian premise: Things are only going to get worse, so why not just go with it?
  9. Reviewed by: Wesley Morris
    Nov 10, 2011
    88
    The achievement of this movie is that Kaurismäki manages the seemingly impossible task of making a farce about farces. In other words, this is a very good movie in quotation marks and a very good movie.
  10. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    Nov 3, 2011
    88
    Does Kaurismaki believe in his own fairy tale? The movie, a humble delight, suggests the answer is yes.
  11. Reviewed by: Phil Coldiron
    Oct 17, 2011
    88
    For Carl Dreyer, to film a miracle took a single shot; for Bruno Dumont, a whole film. In Le Havre, Aki Kaurismäki needs four shots to capture his - and what an ordinary event it is!
  12. Reviewed by: Marc Mohan
    Jan 26, 2012
    83
    Kaurismäki is a master of expressive stillness for whom inaction often speaks louder than words, and the performances he elicits are perfectly pitched, including young Miguel's.
User Score
7.0

Generally favorable reviews- based on 22 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 4
  2. Negative: 1 out of 4
  1. Aug 29, 2012
    8
    Told in a simple way by mostly non actors this little gem resolutely sets out a humanistic fable of our times. It gently hammers away at the theme: "we are our brother's keepers" Don't look for a great script, or much acting, or any sophistication. It is what it is. Even the Christian right might find it's theme uncomfortably Christ like. A man does good and is rewarded with a miracle. Warning check your cynicism at the door, or at your DVD Play button. Full Review »
  2. Aug 4, 2012
    0
    Created a metacritic account just to tell you that if you want to see a comedy, or even a drama, this is not for you. The acting is completely stiff, there is no human emotion at all. The most emotion comes from a completely unnecessary 5 minute long concert scene from Little Bob. I don't understand the high ratings. Poor directing, poor acting, could care less about the story. Objectively bad. Full Review »
  3. Aug 7, 2014
    5
    I agree with everydayscholar. This film is so bad that I went through it asking myself who financed this **** in the first place. Bad acting, bad direction and a subject that must be treated three times a year in European cinema (an old man takes a little boy under his wing). Avoid it. Full Review »