Metascore
73

Generally favorable reviews - based on 29 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 29
  2. Negative: 0 out of 29
  1. Reviewed by: Rex Reed
    Mar 12, 2014
    100
    They are two intelligent, sophisticated people searching for the spicy condiment they need to keep their relationship fresh during a bittersweet weekend in Paris, and, like the film that frames them, they are smart, substantial and enchanting.
  2. Reviewed by: Gabe Toro
    Sep 25, 2013
    91
    Michell’s handling of the relationship between the two is touching in how little judgment he passes.
  3. Reviewed by: Ann Hornaday
    Mar 27, 2014
    88
    In the capable hands of these fine filmmakers and actors, even its most bitter observations about life and aging are nearly always reliably balanced by moments of warmth, understanding and out-and-out screwball humor.
  4. Reviewed by: Susan Wloszczyna
    Mar 14, 2014
    88
    When Michell is on his game, as he definitely is with Le Week-End, he unearths small, invaluable and even profound truths about the human condition that are often as inspiring as they are devastating.
  5. Reviewed by: Lou Lumenick
    Mar 12, 2014
    88
    Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan are superb as the couple, who use the occasion to drop bombs on each other.
  6. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Mar 27, 2014
    80
    Director Roger Michell ("Notting Hill") has the good sense to step back and let Broadbent and Duncan work their magic on Hanif Kureishi's script. They don't disappoint.
  7. Reviewed by: Anthony Lane
    Mar 14, 2014
    80
    The monologue that Goldblum delivers there, grand with illusion and larded with mouthfuls of canapes, is entirely delicious -- roguish and absurd, but lending the film a zest that it was in danger of losing. [17 March 2014, p.79]
  8. 80
    Le Week-End is a marital ­disintegration–reintegration drama that opens with a dose of frost and vinegar and turns believably sweet—and unbelievably marvelous, in light of what had seemed a depressing trajectory.
  9. Reviewed by: Joe Neumaier
    Mar 13, 2014
    80
    A smart, ardent, profound movie.
  10. Reviewed by: A.O. Scott
    Mar 13, 2014
    80
    Don’t be fooled by Mr. Broadbent’s genial sarcasm, Ms. Duncan’s warm smile or the literary felicities of Mr. Kureishi’s script. This is not a movie about the gentle aging of lovable codgers.
  11. Reviewed by: Joshua Rothkopf
    Mar 11, 2014
    80
    Make room for the modest but affecting pleasures of veteran actors tearing into the subject of golden-years resignation.
  12. Reviewed by: Dave Calhoun
    Oct 8, 2013
    80
    It’s lightly played, often very funny and shot all over Paris with energy and wit, and boosted by superb, inquiring turns from Broadbent and Duncan.
  13. Reviewed by: James Mottram
    Oct 7, 2013
    80
    The result? An accomplished, bittersweet drama that's more bitter than sweet.
  14. Reviewed by: Dennis Harvey
    Sep 25, 2013
    80
    Bittersweet, charming yet often very thorny.
  15. Reviewed by: David Rooney
    Sep 25, 2013
    80
    The film is imbued with an engaging mix of warmth and prickliness by the lovely, lived-in performances of Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan.
  16. Reviewed by: David Gritten
    Sep 25, 2013
    80
    Sophisticated, sharp and funny, Le Week-End achieves an unusual coup: it’s a film about two older characters that is neither deeply gloomy (like, say, Amour) nor twinkly and cheerily upbeat.
  17. Reviewed by: Catherine Shoard
    Sep 25, 2013
    80
    For all its flaws - in fact, perhaps because of them - Le Week-End is a work borne from, and provoking, real feeling.
  18. Reviewed by: Bill Stamets
    Mar 20, 2014
    75
    This late adulthood lark is a treat.
  19. Reviewed by: Walter Addiego
    Mar 20, 2014
    75
    This film doesn't feel obliged to pick a winner or lob easy answers; it aims to observe, with humor and humanity, with penetration and without oversimplifying.
  20. 75
    Goldblum is always best at being Jeff Goldblum, and his oily/silky charm tends to unbalance the neat, brittle little tragedy we’re watching.
  21. Reviewed by: R. Kurt Osenlund
    Sep 25, 2013
    75
    Both keenly calculated and flowing with offbeat, naturalistic detail, Hanif Kureishi's jewel of a script reflects his sensibilities as a playwright.
  22. Reviewed by: Jonathan Kiefer
    Mar 11, 2014
    70
    The great insight in director Roger Michell's fourth collaboration with writer Hanif Kureishi is its vision of Paris as an arena equally amenable to romantic comedy and sulking tragedy.
  23. Reviewed by: Kimberley Jones
    Apr 2, 2014
    67
    Director Roger Michell and his frequent writer Hanif Kureishi (their last film together was Venus) regularly dance to the very cliff’s edge of despair, and only for the grace of good casting do you not wish they’d just jump and get it over with.
  24. Reviewed by: Mike Scott
    Jun 20, 2014
    60
    Michell's is a film with somewhere to go -- and that journey is one well worth taking.
  25. Reviewed by: Mike D'Angelo
    Mar 11, 2014
    60
    Screenwriter Hanif Kureishi (My Beautiful Laundrette, Sammy And Rosie Get Laid) sometimes overdoes the emotional-seesaw routine... But director Roger Michell (who’s previously worked with Kureishi on The Mother, Venus, and the miniseries The Buddha Of Suburbia) maintains a slightly jagged rhythm that proves disarming, and he has two magnificent collaborators in Broadbent and Duncan.
  26. Reviewed by: Dan Jolin
    Oct 7, 2013
    60
    Writer / director team Kureishi and Michell add to their partnership with an insightful look at life-long commitment.
  27. Reviewed by: Ben Kenigsberg
    Mar 12, 2014
    58
    The end of Le Week-End reveals it to be the thoroughly ordinary melodrama a description suggests — a portrait of former ’60s fire-starters who are perfectly happy to settle for embers.
  28. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Mar 13, 2014
    50
    The main — and for my money only — attraction in Le Week-End, which was directed by Roger Michell, is the marvelous Scottish actress Lindsay Duncan. She is witty, fiercely intelligent and intensely sexy in the role of Meg, a woman stuck in a failing marriage.
  29. Reviewed by: Kenneth Turan
    Mar 13, 2014
    40
    Le Week-End is a sour and misanthropic film masquerading as an honest and sensitive romance. A painful and unremittingly bleak look at a difficult marriage, it wants us to sit through a range of domestic horrors without offering much of anything as a reward.
User Score
6.8

Generally favorable reviews- based on 21 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 10
  2. Negative: 1 out of 10
  1. Lyn
    Jul 20, 2014
    8
    This is "Before Midnight" for the retirement-age set. Unlike the couple in that other film, Nick and Meg don't shriek incessantly at eachThis is "Before Midnight" for the retirement-age set. Unlike the couple in that other film, Nick and Meg don't shriek incessantly at each other about all the things they've been pissed off about for 8 or 10 years. Rather (because they're older? More rational? English?) they pick at some well-worn weaknesses as they also mull over their marriage and their respective lots in life. And as they companionably gad about In Paris, which of course makes it more entertaining. This is the kind of role Jim Broadbent so often plays to perfection, and Lindsay Duncan also is great as an older woman trying to maintain her edge. Jeff Goldblum adds some fizz as a guy who seems like an older version of the funny/annoying dork he played in "The Big Chill." I like the way this film portrays late-in-life complexities ... bleak at times, funny at times: thought-provoking. Full Review »
  2. Mar 16, 2014
    8
    “Le Week End” is a charming, warm and deeper than it purports to be film written by Hanef Kureishi with directorial credits going to Roger“Le Week End” is a charming, warm and deeper than it purports to be film written by Hanef Kureishi with directorial credits going to Roger Michell. The film stars Jim Broadbent, Lindsay Duncan and, in the latter half, Jeff Goldblum. Although ostensibly the story of a British married couple of 30 years celebrating their anniversary in Paris, it is much more than that. Its British umbrella goes beyond that country’s culture to cause any long married couple of any nationality to easily identify with the problems they face as they try to recapture or maybe even create the relationship they each want with the other. Ms. Duncan and Mr. Broadbent dominate the screen as they share their innermost feelings and disappointments in a movie that seems to capture the essence of the “Best Marigold Hotel” film and a tamer and warmer “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Wolf”.Mr. Kureisi’s dialogue is meaningful and profound as the two principal characters encounter the ups and downs of marital life and the burdens and benefits it offers. I give the film an 8 and suggest that the City of Paris be given an honorable mention in the credits for it certainly plays a meaningful role in the lives of this engaging and complicated couple. Full Review »
  3. Sep 22, 2014
    10
    A charming, and affecting look into an elerly couples eventful weekend in Paris. Lindsay Duncan is absolutely phenominal, she demansA charming, and affecting look into an elerly couples eventful weekend in Paris. Lindsay Duncan is absolutely phenominal, she demans screentime, and she delivers a performance that is believeable, smart and and heartfelt. dr Paris has never looked this wonderful, and the score makes it feel like you are walking beside them, laughing with them, arguing amongst them. Well worth it! Full Review »