User Score
6.1

Generally favorable reviews- based on 68 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 41 out of 68
  2. Negative: 20 out of 68
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  1. JasonF.
    Feb 27, 2008
    10
    Baumbach's has an incredible gift of giving genuine life to characters, their flaws glaring and painful even as you fall in love them.
  2. BrettR
    Feb 25, 2008
    9
    Nicole Kidman is back in a big way with fantastic choices and Jennifer Jason Leigh is an amazing compliment to her playing her sister. I found the writing fascinating, though I found the subplot of "coming of age" of Kidman's son a little tired.
  3. ChadS.
    Jan 4, 2008
    9
    Since "Margot at the Wedding" denies its audience any childhood flashbacks, meeting mom might provide some illumination on the fractured relationship between both sisters, but we never get to meet her; the matriarch of a severely dysfunctional family, because Margot(Nicole Kidman) runs away with her son Claude(Zane Pais). "Margot at the Wedding" is seemingly photographed through the prism Since "Margot at the Wedding" denies its audience any childhood flashbacks, meeting mom might provide some illumination on the fractured relationship between both sisters, but we never get to meet her; the matriarch of a severely dysfunctional family, because Margot(Nicole Kidman) runs away with her son Claude(Zane Pais). "Margot at the Wedding" is seemingly photographed through the prism of Margot's writerly mind. Sometimes the sun is out, but nobody feels its warmth. Margot's emotional baggage acts like an eclipse. Her life and art are too intertwined. Margot confuses her family with their fictionalized counterparts and stares them down with the same cold eye of objectivity. Margot is in dire need of an editor to discourage her word choice as a mother when speaking to Claude. She brutalizes him with honesty that will inevitably cut his heart out. After all, a writer's words are precise like a Ginzu knife. It's already too late for Pauline(Jennifer Jason Leigh), Margot's first victim, and certainly not her last. Like "The Squid and the Whale", this filmmaker depicts self-love. As Margot pleasures herself, it's clear that the intent isn't born out of eroticism. The act itself is a metaphor for the love/hate relationship Margot negotiates with her mind; a self-perpetuating cycle of self-absorption and release. "Margot at the Wedding" is not entertaining in the traditional sense of the word, but you can't take your eyes off this Dogma(the movement founded by Danish filmmaker Lars Von Trier)-like presentation of human wreckage in the countryside, served on a silver platter for Margot's abstract consumption. Expand
  4. ElliotC
    Dec 16, 2007
    9
    Only philistines would not like this movie
  5. yoriD
    Dec 15, 2007
    10
    This is not a mainstream movie and I'm glad. No happy endings. A chapter in people's lives. Funny,sad,disturbing,everything....just raw. Nicole Kidman just disappeared in her role. If you like "Squid..." don't see why you wouldn't this one... Loooooooooooved it.
  6. AnaMorales
    Dec 5, 2007
    10
    Congrats to Baumbach who is not afraid of creating characters that are not nice to see, but totally real and brilliantly performed by this, without exception, excellent cast.
  7. [Anonymous]
    Nov 16, 2007
    10
    Excellent Nicole is brilliant.
  8. JackT.
    Nov 16, 2007
    10
    Nicole Kidman is sensational here.
  9. DrewW.
    Nov 15, 2007
    9
    Nicole Kidman gives one of her best performances of her career as the title character Margot.
  10. HernanM.
    Nov 15, 2007
    10
    Amazing!... Leigh is terrific!
Metascore
66

Generally favorable reviews - based on 37 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 25 out of 37
  2. Negative: 3 out of 37
  1. Margot at the Wedding doesn’t develop; it just skips from one squirmy scene to the next.
  2. Noah Baumbach has followed up his acclaimed 2005 breakthrough "The Squid and the Whale" with another wryly observed, giddily cringe-inducing, bracingly original winner.
  3. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    70
    This study of a disastrous reunion of two sisters feels more like a collection of arresting scenes than a fully conceived and developed drama.