User Score
8.8

Universal acclaim- based on 232 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 8 out of 232
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  1. May 6, 2011
    10
    A classic. Deeply moving, funny, and heartbreaking. What seems a simple story of a misfit stuck in the system is magnified into an epic power struggle that reveals both the heights and depths of human nature. Movies don't get any better than this.
  2. Sep 30, 2011
    9
    If the movie was this heartwarming and friendly, I wonder how good the book is.
  3. Dec 30, 2011
    10
    Jack Nicholson is awarded his first of three Oscars for his performance as Randle P. McMurphy, a con trying to make his life easier by pretending he is crazy, so he can go to a mental institution, or "Cuckoo's Nest". Louise Fletcher also won an Oscar as Nurse Ratched, a quiet character oozing with evil. Sometimes crazy, sometimes wise, sometimes sad, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is aJack Nicholson is awarded his first of three Oscars for his performance as Randle P. McMurphy, a con trying to make his life easier by pretending he is crazy, so he can go to a mental institution, or "Cuckoo's Nest". Louise Fletcher also won an Oscar as Nurse Ratched, a quiet character oozing with evil. Sometimes crazy, sometimes wise, sometimes sad, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a sure classic. Expand
  4. Aug 13, 2010
    10
    One of the greatest and most iconic films ever made.

    79? 79??? People are nuts. This movie is one of the most remembered classics in the history of cinema. With engaging and fully developed characters, a good story, great dialogue, and overall wholesome entertainment, the metascore is 79? Tell me if you have ever seen Jack Nicholson in a more rebellious, free-spirited, fun-loving, iconic
    One of the greatest and most iconic films ever made.

    79? 79??? People are nuts. This movie is one of the most remembered classics in the history of cinema. With engaging and fully developed characters, a good story, great dialogue, and overall wholesome entertainment, the metascore is 79?

    Tell me if you have ever seen Jack Nicholson in a more rebellious, free-spirited, fun-loving, iconic role than R. P. McMurphy. In fact, could any other actor do that type of role with the same energy and enigma Nicholson brought to the table? Never. This was a destined role for a great actor like Nicholson. He lives and breathes the character as if he is the essence of the film.

    And Louise Fletcher? Even though in her entire career, this was the only role she was known for, it is STILL one of the greatest villains in history. Fletcher plays Ratched with no smile, all work, and a sinister need for control. And the supporting cast of mental patients are equally brilliant.

    This movie has everything an entertaining movie needs: plot, great characters, great dialogue, emotion, comedy, tragedy. This film is epic. It is a shame critics still disfavor such a classic.
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  5. Oct 15, 2011
    10
    I can't tell whether this movie is either heart-warming of the powerful struggle against a dictatorial ruler, or a sad tale within the harshness of the mental hospital representation of the control built within autocratic societies. It's not like they treat you as human beings, pickled on drugs and manipulated through humiliation.
    But, the role of this anti-authoritarian rebel, who goes
    I can't tell whether this movie is either heart-warming of the powerful struggle against a dictatorial ruler, or a sad tale within the harshness of the mental hospital representation of the control built within autocratic societies. It's not like they treat you as human beings, pickled on drugs and manipulated through humiliation.
    But, the role of this anti-authoritarian rebel, who goes along the name of Randle P. McMurphy and the main protagonist of this inspirational film, is perfectly suited to a gentleman called, and of which became his debut award-winning role, Jack Nicholson. A choice of a lifetime - either that, it would take him years to get noticed, probably. Do you think he would have gained roles in such films as As Good As It Gets, playing an obsessive compulsive with an attitude problem? Something's Gotta Give? Anger Management? He certainly looked like he deserved that Academy Award for best actor, which is quite a stupid statement, because he did.
    And who wouldn't give to play a role, a role against an autocratic system. Somehow a sad, somehow ferocious battle. The main antagonist, Nurse Ratched, played by Louise Fletcher, as well as having a name that sounds like a sharp, steel knife, a cold, biting winter, making you think of scratchy, horrible things, it was her calm, yet within, sadistic, demeanour that somehow took a strong grip, on not just the ward full of patients with multi-layered problems, but the audience. The involvement creates a chilling and uncomfortable atmosphere, yet you carry on watching the film because you want to see what happens within this system, being just so engrossed in it to not stop watching it. It's films like these that keep us on our toes and feel for ourselves the control and power that these patients experienced.
    I cannot predict people's reactions for the ending, although it might be obvious to some. There is always a difference between the book and the film. Chief Bromden, apart from Randle, (or 'Mack', how he is called), is sane, not exactly showing it in the beginning. Seems like a one way ticket to peace and tranquillity, but it is fortunate enough that Randle was lucky to be there with him in the first place. Instead of thinking that the villains have to have their way, it is often an accomplishment within the human spirit, and Randle certainly brought the spirit within the hospital. Winning 5 Academy Awards which including Best Actress (Louise Fletcher) and Best Screenplay, this psychological drama is none more deserving which makes you think more about the society we live in. And for me? A touching poignant idea on the idea of an autocratic society, and the strength of the human spirit.
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  6. Nov 16, 2013
    6
    Pretty good film. Nicholson is awesome in the lead role, but it does not make up for the rest of the film. Beautifully filmed, but the storyline is just...boring. Yes, it's dark, heartwarming, and emotional, but it feels like we're cooped up in the asylum as well and are just as bored as the people there.
  7. Jul 7, 2013
    9
    Randal McMurphy steps out of the car and calmly strides in and sits patiently, waiting to be analysed by the doctor, Jack Nicholson begins to deliver not only one of the finest performances of his career, but creates one of the most iconic and memorable characters to grace the screen.
    The style, performances and wonderful variations of characters have put a sometimes flawed but otherwise
    Randal McMurphy steps out of the car and calmly strides in and sits patiently, waiting to be analysed by the doctor, Jack Nicholson begins to deliver not only one of the finest performances of his career, but creates one of the most iconic and memorable characters to grace the screen.
    The style, performances and wonderful variations of characters have put a sometimes flawed but otherwise masterful piece of work from Miloš The silent bliss that often accompanies many of the scenes where the dialogue is thin but the acting is superb, human interaction at its finest. The genius if RP McMurphy is the performance of Nicholson, we never quite know if this man is insane, thus ending up at the mental institution, or if his cunning wit but also lazy nature has brought him here.
    But of course, there is quite the proverbial thorn in the side of our anti-hero, in the form of Nurse Ratched, a calculated and frightening care worker within the walls if the institute who is brought to life in eerily silent fashion by Louise Fletcher, her focused and condescending persona against the live wire and rambling Nicholson is a perfect light and dark or good vs evil-type set-up.
    The undeniable highlights of the film are interactions McMurphy has with his fellow patients including Cheswick, Martini and of course Chief, the silent giant. From these characters it is clear that the intentions of McMurphy become somewhat unclear, is he around just to mess with their heads or is he trying to help them? But the interactions and confrontations that happen between McMurphy and Nurse Ratchet are uniquely cold, still and disturbing. The purpose unclear, but the entertainment in full swing.
    The flawed moments lie in the arc of the story. The comedy, while enjoyable, also overlaps with the very serious nature of the film, which can sometimes create a blurred line as to what we should and shouldn't be amused about, but perhaps this was the intention, for reaction and criticism purposes.
    The performances alone are enough to grant this masterful status, but the blend of sombre techniques and a varied score of heartwarming and heartbreaking demeanour has made it unique in every possible way, from the setting to the situations.
    One of the most quotable and memorable films you will watch, with its superb characters who go above and beyond in their roles to encapsulate their characters, it truly is a great sense of wonder.
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  8. Jul 13, 2013
    8
    Oscar’s two-times BEST DIRECTOR winners is an elite coterie (newly recruited is Ang Lee earlier this year), Czech-born Milo Forman is another foreigner has accomplished the one-two punch with this film and AMADEUS (1984, 9/10). What’s more impressive, it achieved another grand slam in all 5 major Oscar categories.

    Basically the film is confined inside a mental institution, among a breed
    Oscar’s two-times BEST DIRECTOR winners is an elite coterie (newly recruited is Ang Lee earlier this year), Czech-born Milo Forman is another foreigner has accomplished the one-two punch with this film and AMADEUS (1984, 9/10). What’s more impressive, it achieved another grand slam in all 5 major Oscar categories.

    Basically the film is confined inside a mental institution, among a breed of patients, a newcomer McMurphy’s arrival stirs Nurse Ratched’s tyranny, whose strategy of manipulating those deranged is to coerce them into retread their horrible past and force them suffer under the name of group therapy, such a detestable character, Louise Fletcher nailed it, a borderline leading role, Fletcher’s Oscar victory may raise some controversy, but her performance is impeccable in accentuating a devilish incarnation of obstinacy and ruthlessness. Nicholson won his first Oscar in his heyday, as McMurphy, a petty criminal has a sane mind, threatens the authorities as a black sheep in the group, whose devil-may-care boldness and utter naivety (assuming that the institution is a much better place than a prisoners’ reforming farm) conflicts in the process of his freedom-seeking and his direct influence on other real mentally-impaired ward mates, ultimately, his tragedy is a boomerang to his gullibility and self-considered kindness, which squanders his best shot of escape and obliquely preconditions Billy’s final breakdown. The ambivalence of McMurphy’s heroic recklessness is the most intriguing topic of the film, he is not an amiable fellow, a ruffian on the street with a rebellious attitude, it is not in his intention to ameliorate his fellow mates’ condition, his presence does not have an initiative motivation, what he does is his knee-jerking response of a living soul who hankers for an unsubdued environment which the society refuses to proffer.

    There are many political allusions can be extracted from the film, to which I shall not refer since I am no American and am unfamiliar with the history, but the film garners a great amount of impressive supporting performances, Dourif’s big screen debut is stutteringly poignant, whose demise is a facile move in heightening the tension, but performance-wise, it is more awe-inspiring than the two leads aforementioned. Sampson, as the Chief, symbolizes the hope of the unsuppressed, his backstory is curtailed and his pretense has never been given a chance to be expounded. Two old-hand actors are surprisingly seen in this film when in their youth, a tough Lloyd and a meek DeVito, and many deceased names also, Crothers, Redfield and Lassick, the latter is another show-stealer, over-the-top but strikingly hilarious.

    Forman’s preference over classical music also reflects in the film, the opening score from Jack Nitzsche hums along with a melancholic tone and the symphony-driven pieces are inserted into the right place at the right time. There are many memorable shots, e.g. Nicholson being electric-shocked and Fletcher being strangled are too authentic to stare, on the whole ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST is a sound accusation towards high-handed suppression and dominance, its sociological impact even rises above over the film’s own integrity of a gem made with excellent cast and wry irony.
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  9. Dec 5, 2013
    10
    Pitch perfect performances, the leisurely pacing and more importantly the striking commentary on mental health institutions make One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest a timeless classic, that hasn't aged in 40 years and probably never will.
  10. Aug 25, 2014
    9
    To a film that won all 5 major awards at the Oscars, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is as eccentric as it is heartbreaking. This film served as the vehicle which would jumpstart Nicholson's career.
  11. Nov 29, 2013
    8
    One of the most satisfying films you will watch, with its superb characters who go above and beyond in their roles to encapsulate their characters. This is one of Jack Nicolson's best roles.
  12. Aug 2, 2013
    10
    This is one of the best movies ever created. Count on me when I say that. This movie is hilarious, sad, and heartbreaking. I could recommend this more. There are no words to express it...Maybe because my vecobulary is bad xD But jokes aside, you must watch this movie before you die
  13. Nov 15, 2012
    10
    Cuckoo's nest is the very definition of an enduring classic. It's funny, heartwarming, and tragic, all before it plucks you out of your seat and floors you. A masterpiece.
  14. Nov 28, 2012
    10
    In Milos Forman's 1975 Best Picture Winning adaption of the classic Ken Kesey novel, "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest", he doesn't just create an overwhelmingly inspiring and entertaining flick, but he creates one of the greatest movies of all time. I've said it before and I'll say it again; Jack Nicholson's Academy Award Winning turn as R.P. McMurphy is one of my all-time favorite filmIn Milos Forman's 1975 Best Picture Winning adaption of the classic Ken Kesey novel, "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest", he doesn't just create an overwhelmingly inspiring and entertaining flick, but he creates one of the greatest movies of all time. I've said it before and I'll say it again; Jack Nicholson's Academy Award Winning turn as R.P. McMurphy is one of my all-time favorite film characters, and he ultimately makes this movie that much more entertaining. Everyone else did an incredible job in their respective roles, including Louise Fletcher's Academy Award Winning portrayal of the villainous Nurse Ratched, a young Danny DeVito's depiction of Martini, and a young Christopher Lloyd's illustration of Taber. Now, I know that some people claim that movie bastardizes the book because it's not told from the perspective of another character in the film. However, the movie still effectively presents the themes that are communicated in the novel, and it still makes a meaningful attempt at trying to portray all the events in the novel correctly. "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest" was a movie that was ahead of it's time. If it were released now, in 2011, I wholeheartedly believe that it would be a success - bigger than it was in 1975. It makes you laugh until it hurts you it makes you feel horrible, and it makes you cheer in triumphant glory. Perfection. Expand
  15. Dec 23, 2013
    10
    The message here is that life is full of joy and happiness, even in places you won't expect. We experience the asylum through the eyes of McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) as he arrives there and gets into the routine. Some suspect that he is faking his insanity to get out of a jail sentence.

    This debate is never really explored in the movie. He may have been a little unorthodox but surely
    The message here is that life is full of joy and happiness, even in places you won't expect. We experience the asylum through the eyes of McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) as he arrives there and gets into the routine. Some suspect that he is faking his insanity to get out of a jail sentence.

    This debate is never really explored in the movie. He may have been a little unorthodox but surely enough he is sane most of the time, except for the occasional rips in the exterior when we can't really be sure, like when he claims to be able to lift a certain heavy object and use it to make his escape. And he does not seem to be especially concerned about being thrown between people who are clearly more disturbed in their minds. He only loses his cool when he is being repeatedly pestered, which I think most people would. He feels constrained by authority and almost immediately after coming to the facility attempts to meddle with the schedule set in place for the patients. On several occasions he disregards rules and regulations entirely and creates serious trouble for the institution. Occasionally we delve into the lives of some of the other patients and learn about their experiences before they were committed.

    Nicholson delivers a once in a lifetime performance. McMurphy is so full of life that you can't help but be drawn to him. The plot takes you to wherever Mac decides to take us, and it is a ride of wonder. The secondary characters were well realized and quite fun to watch. The interactions between them were the source of much of the humour in the movie.

    Some treatments allegedly used for the benefit of the patients are also highlighted, like Electroconvulsive therapy and Lobotomy. The way the staff keeps control over the patients has the same underlying threat of force or punishment to keep them in line just like in a prison.

    Towards the end, McMurphy sacrifices his own interests to show his friends what life is like on the outside. By embracing the joys of life, he embodies its values more than the ones who claim to be assisting the people in this madhouse.

    I always wondered how people went mad, and why so few came back to sanity. Though it may present a dramatized version of it, it was moving when it came. And the fact that 'normal' people expected 'mad' people to behave in a certain way, and maybe even welcomed it, is perhaps the reason when somewhat disturbed people when admitted into institutions only deteriorate as they conform to the commonly accepted view. Perhaps a bit of understanding and love may be the key to make the disturbed people believe that they are indeed wanted and should make an effort to resolve their unresolved issues, and be more resolute and assertive about their needs.

    This isn't the kind of movie to depend on cinematography and score. It's very simple and straightforward. Sometimes having glitter only ruins the effect, and I'm glad that's not how the movie was made. The focus was on acting, directing and screenplay. When these departments are well looked after, you can have a good decent movie without the need of an especially big budget.

    Not many movies would be able to achieve the same sense of belonging one could feel for with people declared clinically insane, and I feel like it speaks for the strength of the director, Milas Forman, who has a knack for portraying out of the ordinary individuals in situations that are themselves quite extraordinary.
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  16. Jul 7, 2013
    10
    A definite contender for the greatest film of all time. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a beautifully written/directed piece of cinema with one of greatest ensemble casts you are ever likely to witness. Louise Fletcher, for me, steals the show with her seemingly effortless attempt at playing the twisted, manipulative character that is Nurse Ratched. Her performance is undoubtedlyA definite contender for the greatest film of all time. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a beautifully written/directed piece of cinema with one of greatest ensemble casts you are ever likely to witness. Louise Fletcher, for me, steals the show with her seemingly effortless attempt at playing the twisted, manipulative character that is Nurse Ratched. Her performance is undoubtedly flawless and that's not to mention the lead role of R.P McMurphy, played by the legendary Jack Nicholson who, like the rest of the cast, puts on an almighty show. Arguably, the scene that guaranteed the Oscar win for Best Picture is the scene where Billy is caught by Nurse Ratched in the morning. The use of silence here is impeccable and really puts us in the centre of the situation with the other patients who loom helplessly in the background watching the drama unfold. It's certainly no surprise that OFOTCN is one of only three films to have ever won the famous "Oscar Grand slam", winning Best Lead Actor, Best Lead Actress, Best Picture, Best Director and Best Screenplay. The reasoning behind this is that the film is immaculate in every way possible and one that will most likely never be emulated. Expand
  17. Feb 28, 2013
    8
    This movie is an all time classic that everybody should see at least once. I really liked this movie when I saw it, and both the movie and Jack Nicholson deserved the Oscar for Best Picture and Best Actor respectively. But the ending of this movie really bothers me. I don't think it fits with the rest of the movie and I have to say that it pulls down the overall-experience.
  18. Mar 25, 2013
    8
    I very much appreciated this movie. It was done extremely well. The characters were fantastic. I found it slow in parts but it really is a wonderful piece of movie history. I have enjoyed other films more than this but it is definitely worth the time to watch.
  19. Jul 30, 2013
    8
    Amazing film. Never watched a film that put me through so many different emotions, from happiness and hysterics to being on the verge of tears. Brilliantly done. Jack Nicholson deserves his Oscar for his role as RP McMurphy, as did Louise Fletcher for the evil Nurse Ratched.
  20. Aug 23, 2013
    9
    One of the most realistic dramas ever filmed. Adapted from a masterpiece of literature, "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" shows itself to be a hauntingly accurate adaptation. With headstrong acting by Nicholson and Fletcher, it captivates you and gives you sympathy to the mentally isolated patients. One of the greatest.
  21. Oct 26, 2014
    10
    A truly heartwarming and awe inspiring film; one I believe to be one of, if not the best film of all time. This film was a rare treat in which I found myself shouting with joy when things went well for characters and screaming and crying with sorrow when it didn't. An outstanding performance from Jack Nicholson, whom I believe to be the best actor to have lived, is accompanied by amazingA truly heartwarming and awe inspiring film; one I believe to be one of, if not the best film of all time. This film was a rare treat in which I found myself shouting with joy when things went well for characters and screaming and crying with sorrow when it didn't. An outstanding performance from Jack Nicholson, whom I believe to be the best actor to have lived, is accompanied by amazing performances from Sydney Lassick, Christoper Lloyd, Will Sampson, Brad Dourif and Louise Fletcher. This film is relate-able to so many people, as it delves into human nature and kindness between one another; forgetting that the majority of the characters we see suffer from severe mental disabilities. From the moment you see Jack Nicholson walk on screen you're hooked (his acting was just spot on), and the director creates an environment, that against all odds feels as if you can become completely immersed and a part of.
    10/10 Absolutely brilliant film that will go down as a all time classic.
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  22. chw
    Jul 17, 2014
    10
    One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest is, to me, the best movie of all time. The acting was perfect, the script was perfect. the story was perfect. The only thing that wasn't perfect in the good way was Nurse Ratched.
  23. May 18, 2014
    9
    A classic! One of the great jack Nicholson movies. Jack plays as a con man (Randal p mcmurphy) a con man who pretends to me mentally ill, so he doesn't have to go to Jail, realizes that the patents are treated unfairly, and tries to make the place more joyful, with his big personality and careless attitude. This is a great movie, about A man who does what he thinks right while bringing aA classic! One of the great jack Nicholson movies. Jack plays as a con man (Randal p mcmurphy) a con man who pretends to me mentally ill, so he doesn't have to go to Jail, realizes that the patents are treated unfairly, and tries to make the place more joyful, with his big personality and careless attitude. This is a great movie, about A man who does what he thinks right while bringing a shine to a mental hospital. Great movie I definitely recommended it. Expand
  24. Aug 15, 2014
    8
    One flew over the cuckoo's nest is a strange but brilliant cinematic piece. Jack Nicholson without a doubt proves illness can be cured with innocence and assurance.
  25. Nov 22, 2014
    10
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is my favourite movie. It is so powerful, how it makes you want to be the protagonist and hurt (or kill) the antagonist yourself. It's like how when you watch The Green Mile and you want to hurt Percy so badly.
  26. Apr 29, 2015
    9
    Arguably, some of the issues addressed by One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest are not as relevant in 2006 as they were in the mid-1970s, but that realization in no way diminishes the film's dramatic impact. This was the second English language film for Czech-born filmmaker Milos Forman, who would go on to win two Oscars (one for this movie and one for Amadeus), and was the picture thatArguably, some of the issues addressed by One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest are not as relevant in 2006 as they were in the mid-1970s, but that realization in no way diminishes the film's dramatic impact. This was the second English language film for Czech-born filmmaker Milos Forman, who would go on to win two Oscars (one for this movie and one for Amadeus), and was the picture that catapulted him onto the A-list for directors. The negative aspects of mental health care impugned by One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest are largely no longer in place today (electroconvulsive therapy is rarely used, frontal lobotomies are not performed), but the film's other themes are germane. On the surface, the movie is about the struggle of wills between patient R.P. McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) and Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher). Beneath the surface, it's about the attempts of an autocratic force to squash the individual.

    Jail is a frequent residence for McMurphy, whose latest conviction is for statutory rape. Rather than spending time behind bars, he decides it might be easier to serve his time in a psychiatric hospital, so he "plays mad." The plan works, but McMurphy soon discovers that life isn't so great in an asylum. The rules are looser, but some of the privileges he associated with prison - like being able to watch the World Series on TV - do not apply. Undaunted, McMurphy begins to make himself the most popular man in the ward, appealing to types as diverse as the diminutive, talkative Martini (Danny DeVito) and the tall deaf-mute American Indian, who is known as "The Chief" (Will Sampson). There to thwart McMurphy at every turn is Nurse Ratched, whose methods of treatment are so proscribed by rules and regulations that she can't see she's sometimes doing more harm than good.

    The most evident conflict throughout One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is that between Ratched and McMurphy. They are natural antagonists. She's a strait-laced, by the book individual and he's a freespirit and rule breaker who pushes the envelope at every opportunity. (The reason he's in prison is evidence of that - having sex with a 15-year old.) For much of the film, they probe one another, each winning minor skirmishes. As the narrative accelerates toward its conclusion, McMurphy risks all in a final gambit. When he loses, we know it's over for him. For all that she is the film's villain, Ratched is not inherently malevolent. She's cool and unemotional, but she believes what she is doing is for the betterment of the patients. She's one of those individuals who does bad things while thinking she's doing good. That makes her more complex and interesting than a character who represents evil incarnate.

    The film's ending is unsurprisingly its strongest aspect. McMurphy's fate, presented in such an uncompromising manner, is like a punch to the gut, and the last true act of friendship shown to him by Chief brings a tear to the eye. The final scene is meant to be cathartic, but it doesn't seem that way. Although it's accurate to say that freedom has been attained by both Chief and McMurphy (albeit in different ways), it's hard to see the conclusion as anything but a cloud with a silver lining. For a film that is inspiring and upbeat for most of its running length, this change in tone leaves the viewer disoriented.

    Ken Kesey, who wrote the book upon which the 1963 Broadway play and the subsequent movie were based, was displeased with the screenplay credited to Bo Goldman and Lawrence Hauben (Milos Forman also had a hand in writing it). He felt it detoured too far from what he had written, and refused to participate in publicizing the finished product. Nevertheless, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest became one of the most celebrated movies of the 1970s, winning the "Big Five" Academy Awards (Actor, Actress, Director, Picture, and Screenplay) and being nominated for an additional four. Although the picture has not aged as well as some of its contemporaries, its themes remain germane, the story has lost none of its punch, and the performances retain their freshness. Viewed 30 years after its release, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest remains a very good motion picture, although one that perhaps just misses the pinnacle of greatness where its reputation suggests it resides.
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Metascore
79

Generally favorable reviews - based on 7 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 7
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 7
  3. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. 70
    This slick and entertaining 1975 film of Ken Kesey's cult novel will inevitably disappoint admirers of director Milos Forman's earlier work.
  2. 75
    So good in so many of its parts that there's a temptation to forgive it when it goes wrong. But it does go wrong, insisting on making larger points than its story really should carry, so that at the end, the human qualities of the characters get lost in the significance of it all. And yet there are those moments of brilliance.
  3. Reviewed by: Jake Hamilton
    100
    Too many classic set pieces to mention but keep your ears cocked for that immortal line "Mmmm, Juicy Fruit." Certified brilliance.