Metascore
68

Generally favorable reviews - based on 31 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 24 out of 31
  2. Negative: 2 out of 31
  1. Reviewed by: Stephanie Zacharek
    Jun 16, 2011
    85
    While the media desk isn't the whole of the New York Times, it does give Rossi a solid perch from which to survey the paper's recent and ongoing struggle for both relevancy and revenues.
  2. Reviewed by: Shawn Levy
    Jun 30, 2011
    83
    It's a bit insidery, yes, but isn't it a treat to be brought inside a hidden world by a movie?
  3. Reviewed by: Lisa Schwarzbaum
    Jun 15, 2011
    83
    It's not quite the same thrill as glimpsing the man behind the curtain of the great and powerful Oz, but for journalism junkies, the fascination of Page One: Inside The New York Times is something like that.
  4. Reviewed by: Joe Neumaier
    Jun 17, 2011
    80
    Emphasizing the importance of new media, Stelter is ready to bring the paper back to the future, though this terrific tale of an establishment in transition ultimately plays like "All the President's Men," with the intrigue coming from inside the building.
  5. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    Jun 16, 2011
    80
    Rossi's film makes a compelling case on behalf of the traditional values of journalism.
  6. Reviewed by: Rene Rodriguez
    Jul 7, 2011
    75
    The movie is slick and entertaining, but much of it is as superficial as a Twitter post.
  7. Reviewed by: Roger Moore
    Jul 2, 2011
    75
    Zeroing in on Carr as the movie's "hero" was a smart move. He comes off as smart, confrontational and unconventional.
  8. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Jul 1, 2011
    75
    Given the turbulent water of world affairs and sea changes in the media, a follow-up a year from now might be titled "Gray Lady Down" if the Times does not chart a new course.
  9. Reviewed by: Mick LaSalle
    Jun 30, 2011
    75
    Those of you who don't work for a newspaper may also be interested in what it's like on the inside - how stories are generated, how editors and writers interact, etc. For what it's worth, it's an accurate portrait.
  10. Reviewed by: Michael O'Sullivan
    Jun 30, 2011
    75
    What is their passion for? Not newspapers, or even a single newspaper, per se, but for journalism itself, the practice of which is nowhere stronger than at the Times. That, at least, is how Page One argues it. It's a compelling argument.
  11. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    Jun 30, 2011
    75
    As eye-opening as this movie is, the real story is outside the Times building, in the browser windows and iPads of me and you and everyone we know.
  12. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Jun 30, 2011
    75
    I enjoyed the film very much. It was a visceral pleasure to see a hard-boiled guy like David Carr at its center.
  13. Reviewed by: Bob Mondello
    Jun 17, 2011
    75
    Page One is an insider's view, but if it isn't raking up any muck, it's not a love letter either.
  14. Reviewed by: Peter Travers
    Jun 16, 2011
    75
    Page One is a vital, indispensable hell-raiser.
  15. Reviewed by: Scott Tobias
    Jun 16, 2011
    75
    Rossi never gets around to exploring his opening question: What would the world be without The New York Times? Perhaps, as with a lot of his subjects here, the answer is just too painful to consider, no matter the economic realities.
  16. Reviewed by: Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Jun 13, 2011
    75
    Andrew Rossi's documentary allows The New York Times a kind of nail-biting self-portraiture as it peers off the precipice of (hopefully) a 2.0 rebirth.
  17. Reviewed by: Kenneth Turan
    Jun 23, 2011
    70
    Though it's blessed with a strong subject and some memorable characters and situations, the drawback of this fitfully engaging documentary is that it can't settle on anything even close to a single theme or line of inquiry.
  18. Reviewed by: Ray Greene
    Jun 15, 2011
    70
    Whether Rossi's cautious optimism about the future of a legendary but troubled journalistic institution is justifiable is a story yet to be written, but Page One assures us that if the paper goes down, it will go down swinging.
  19. Reviewed by: J. Hoberman
    Jun 14, 2011
    70
    Opens with a montage of the press in full operational mode, spewing out newspapers all but automatically for a fleet of waiting delivery trucks. It's a system at once efficient and cumbersome, ultra-modern yet quaint, that suggests nothing so much as a herd of dinosaurs, oblivious to the threat of impending extinction.
  20. Reviewed by: Justin Chang
    Jun 12, 2011
    70
    This efficiently assembled primer hardly counts as a revelatory dispatch from the old-vs.-new-media frontlines, but its ideas will engross anyone for whom the viability of traditional newsgathering remains a matter of pressing significance.
  21. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Jul 2, 2011
    67
    With all the talk in Page One about the demise of print journalism and the rise of new media, this shiny spacious emporium seems like both a beacon and a staggering folly.
  22. Reviewed by: Kimberley Jones
    Jun 30, 2011
    67
    (It should also be noted that Page One wears its pro-Times bias on its sleeve, right up to the rankling but now-common inclusion of a "get involved" Web address at film's end.)
  23. 63
    Alas, the filmmaker, maybe because he had to account for every week of his more than year-long visit to the Times, has crowded his film with too many subplots and way, way too many cameos of all the usual suspects, wringing their hands over what will become of newspapers.
  24. Reviewed by: Steven Rea
    Jun 30, 2011
    63
    The paper's motto is "All the News That's Fit to Print." But all that news doesn't necessarily fit neatly into a 90-minute doc.
  25. Reviewed by: David Parkinson
    Sep 19, 2011
    60
    Ironically, it lacks journalistic rigour but it's a fond, nostalgic look at the gilded history of the Grey Lady.
  26. Reviewed by: J.R. Jones
    Jun 30, 2011
    60
    As an avid media watcher, I didn't come away from this with any new insights, but the movie is a pretty good snapshot of the daily newspaper business in transition and turmoil.
  27. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Jun 30, 2011
    60
    The film is interesting and at times enlightening, but it's all over the map.
  28. Reviewed by: Keith Uhlich
    Jun 14, 2011
    60
    The falsely euphoric close is a big misstep - Pulitzers, it would seem, are the ultimate Band-Aid. What was that old adage about printing the legend?
  29. Reviewed by: Dana Stevens
    Jun 17, 2011
    50
    The film spends too much time wringing its hands over the all-too-evident fact that journalism is in crisis, when it could be documenting that crisis from the inside.
  30. Reviewed by: Lou Lumenick
    Jun 17, 2011
    38
    Basically a carefully airbrushed and authorized portrait of the Gray Lady during 14 months when there was serious speculation about the paper's impending demise.
  31. Reviewed by: Michael Kinsley
    Jun 16, 2011
    30
    The movie's main theme, no surprise, is the struggle of The Times to survive in the age of the Internet. But it does little to illuminate that struggle, preferring instead a constant parade of people telling the camera how dreadful it would be if The Times did not survive. True, of course, but boring to the point of irritation after five or six repetitions.
User Score
7.0

Generally favorable reviews- based on 8 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 4
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 4
  3. Negative: 0 out of 4
  1. Aug 10, 2012
    6
    An intriguing documentary on an incredibly timely topic, however its depressive nature combined with a lack of solutions presented make this little more than a revelation of something most already know. Full Review »
  2. Jul 3, 2011
    10
    We enjoyed this insight into print journalism although we though it did not go into great depth. We had seen David Carr on Real Time with Bill Maher the week before which made us interested in the film. The film did not not toot the NY Times horn to much excess and gave us some insight into how a paper operates in today's recessionary world. Beat going to see "Transformers". Full Review »
  3. Jun 26, 2011
    7
    A good, exciting movie which could have gone further. Not a hint about the alleged ideological bias which many believe is on display in the news section of the Gray Lady. It discussed Blair & Miller, but not quite enough about how the top level editors decide what makes A1. But I enjoyed it despite these issues. Full Review »