Metascore
78

Generally favorable reviews - based on 8 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 8
  2. Negative: 0 out of 8
  1. Reviewed by: Peter Debruge
    Mar 18, 2013
    90
    The beauty of the footage is undeniable, and the aimlessness never overstays its welcome as the film documents that strange stretch in our lives when nothing seems to matter more than the present moment, suspended in a sort of idle immortality.
  2. Reviewed by: Manohla Dargis
    Feb 28, 2013
    90
    Unguided by obvious story signposts, you slip from image to image, pulled along by their beauty (the digital cinematography is by Chris Dapkins) and by the dreamy, leisurely rhythms of the editing (by Seth Bomse).
  3. Reviewed by: John DeFore
    Mar 11, 2013
    80
    Throughout, the film's subjects convince us they're doing nothing more than being themselves, so much so that a cynical advisor told Sutton he should market his film as a documentary. That label would prepare potential viewers for Pavilion's lack of story, but it would make a lie of the movie's patient, finely drawn loveliness.
  4. Reviewed by: Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Mar 11, 2013
    75
    Pavilion is an odd thing: a movie that manages to be immersive without being about much of anything.
  5. Reviewed by: Rob Humanick
    Feb 26, 2013
    75
    George Washington this isn't, but there's enough heft here that the comparison can be tastefully made.
  6. Reviewed by: Noel Murray
    Jul 30, 2013
    70
    The lack of anything resembling a narrative at times makes Pavilion feel more like a demo-reel than a movie, but the fleeting moments Sutton has captured are so vibrant that they accumulate into something that hums.
  7. Reviewed by: Gary Goldstein
    Apr 11, 2013
    70
    What you see is pretty much what you get. Fortunately, what we see is often vivid and lovely.
  8. Reviewed by: Michael Atkinson
    Feb 26, 2013
    60
    A ravishingly shot slice of teen-ness that eschews narrative altogether in favor of a moody, watchful wistfulness, this mild-mannered debut plays something like "Bestiaire" for contemporary slacker youth.

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