Picasso and Braque Go to the Movies Image
Metascore
48

Mixed or average reviews - based on 7 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: Picasso and Braque Go to the Movies is a cinematic tour through the effects of the technological revolution, specifically the invention of aviation, the creation of cinema and their interdependent influence on artists Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque. With narration by Scorsese, and interviews with art scholars and artists including Chuck Close, Julian Schnabel and Eric Fischl, the film looks at the collision between film and art at the turn of the 20th Century and helps us to realize cinema's continuing influence on the art of our time. (Arthouse Films) Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 7
  2. Negative: 2 out of 7
  1. 60
    Picasso and Braque's primary merit is its archive-raiding evocation of the period discussed through vintage nitrate images.
  2. What holds the film together, more or less, is the steady stream of mostly slapstick clips from early cinema.
  3. Features a profusion of provocative ideas and a wealth of vintage film clips but is unable to avoid having the inevitable feel of a college thesis.
  4. 40
    It’s a 60-minute documentary that feels like days of watching paint dry.
  5. 38
    There is much to learn from Picasso and Braque Go to the Movies. First, a wealth of sharp professorial minds and great artistic eyes is no guarantee of equivalent documentary moviemaking. Second, when making a sort of thesis statement, it helps to have a thesis.
  6. 25
    The ever-excitable Martin Scorsese, who is listed as a producer and who pops up, bizarrely, to talk about how he decided to stage the last shot of "The Departed," concludes things by saying, "Cubism was not a style. It was a revolution!" Yep. And not in any way a fad.