Metascore
66

Generally favorable reviews - based on 34 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 28 out of 34
  2. Negative: 1 out of 34
Watch On
  1. Reviewed by: Steve Persall
    May 25, 2011
    75
    Spurlock's meetings with skeptical corporate types are punctuated by comments from filmmakers about how product placement - or in Quentin Tarantino's case, being turned down by Denny's - influences creativity.
  2. Reviewed by: Mike Scott
    May 20, 2011
    75
    Spurlock banks on his charm and likability -- and it's that charm and likability that make The Greatest Movie Ever Sold so much fun to watch.
  3. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    May 20, 2011
    75
    Although there are gentle detour discussions about advertising in classrooms and school buses, Spurlock's ironic approach can't convince us that ads are toxic. Indeed, when he visits sprawling Sao Paolo, Brazil, where all outdoor advertising has been banned, it seems as sterile as Stalingrad.
  4. Reviewed by: Guy Dixon
    May 6, 2011
    63
    The problem is that the film, despite an attempt to examine the intellectual pollution of pervasive marketing, can't help coming off as one big smirk.
  5. Reviewed by: Rene Rodriguez
    May 5, 2011
    63
    The movie is at its best when Spurlock dives deep into his subject, interviewing directors such as J.J. Abrams and Quentin Tarantino.
  6. Reviewed by: Roger Moore
    May 4, 2011
    75
    Greatest Movie isn't Spurlock's best. It plays like an overlong, overly cutesy TV news report (woman and man on street interviews included) on product placement.
  7. Reviewed by: Shawn Levy
    Apr 29, 2011
    75
    Even though Spurlock, a totally likeable Everyman, is in the middle of it at all times, "PWPTGMES" never feels like the work of, oh, Michael Moore.
  8. Reviewed by: Marjorie Baumgarten
    Apr 27, 2011
    67
    Worth imbibing, if for no reason other than the bellyache it generates.
  9. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Apr 23, 2011
    50
    Any highfalutin interpretations of his new film only serve to camouflage what is, in essence, a scam about a scam.
  10. Reviewed by: Lisa Schwarzbaum
    Apr 22, 2011
    67
    Always the smooth showman, Spurlock avoids answering his own question: Is he selling out or buying in?
  11. Reviewed by: Lou Lumenick
    Apr 22, 2011
    25
    If I weren't already being paid to watch this movie, I'd feel entitled to compensation for having to sit through this many product plugs.
  12. Reviewed by: Joe Neumaier
    Apr 22, 2011
    40
    Only the extremely naive will be shocked, shocked by director Morgan Spurlock's dissection of product placement in movies.
  13. Reviewed by: James Berardinelli
    Apr 21, 2011
    75
    Its unique take on a common subject lends freshness to the familiar and provides a worthy motivation for seeing this.
  14. Reviewed by: Walter Addiego
    Apr 21, 2011
    75
    His affable, regular-guy shtick works well here, and he scatters the movie with such gleeful ads for his sponsors' products that, if his documentary work ever dries up, his next career choice is obvious.
  15. Reviewed by: Michael O'Sullivan
    Apr 21, 2011
    75
    Like the best ad man, he makes his point by making us laugh.
  16. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    Apr 21, 2011
    88
    Spurlock comes off like a new and improved Everyman, familiar but smarter and funnier than the average Joe.
  17. Reviewed by: Betsy Sharkey
    Apr 21, 2011
    70
    Spurlock creates a good time along with some surprisingly salient observations as he tries to keep his balance on this very slippery slope.
  18. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Apr 21, 2011
    80
    Morgan Spurlock has come up with a terrific idea-a movie about product placements that depends completely on product placements for its financing.
  19. Reviewed by: Stephen Holden
    Apr 21, 2011
    80
    Even more amusing than "Super Size Me," the documentary that put Mr. Spurlock on the moviemaking map in 2004.
  20. Reviewed by: Peter Travers
    Apr 21, 2011
    88
    Spurlock says he's not selling out, he's buying in. I'm buying into Spurlock. As ever, he makes you laugh till it hurts.
  21. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Apr 21, 2011
    63
    The movie is quick and cheerful, and Spurlock is engaging.
  22. Reviewed by: Ethan Gilsdorf
    Apr 21, 2011
    50
    Much like reality TV, nothing much of consequence happens.
  23. Reviewed by: Steven Rea
    Apr 21, 2011
    75
    Is Spurlock selling out by pulling off this stunt? Is he biting the hand that feeds him? Is he working both sides against the middle? And does he think JetBlue is the best airline in the world? You bet.
  24. Reviewed by: Tasha Robinson
    Apr 21, 2011
    75
    The results are scattershot but entertaining, and occasionally eye-opening.
  25. Reviewed by: Michael Wilmington
    Apr 21, 2011
    70
    Funny, informative, and at times outrageously cheeky.
  26. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    Apr 21, 2011
    63
    It's too bad Spurlock settles for so little here, beyond the surface gag.
  27. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Apr 21, 2011
    80
    There are lots of laughs - a commercial Spurlock makes for Mane 'n Tail shampoo is hilarious.
  28. Reviewed by: Stephanie Zacharek
    Apr 21, 2011
    55
    The subject of Spurlock's movie is Spurlock, and while he may be reasonably affable, and sometimes extremely goofy, it's a stretch to call him controversial.
  29. Reviewed by: Steve Ramos
    Apr 21, 2011
    80
    Spurlock is at his trouble making best throughout the film, especially when he persuades longtime consumer advocate and former presidential candidate Ralph Nader by offering him a free pair of Merrell shoes.
  30. Reviewed by: Eric Hynes
    Apr 19, 2011
    40
    Rather than an argument or exposé, the movie is a condescendingly narrated demonstration of how money makes the movie world go round. (Stop the presses.)
  31. Reviewed by: Mark Holcomb
    Apr 19, 2011
    70
    As agreeable as it is insidious, Morgan Spurlock's latest exposé of corporate control via immersive humiliation is his best, most formally inventive project yet.
  32. Reviewed by: Kirk Honeycutt
    Apr 19, 2011
    80
    So don't tell Spurlock he can't have his cake and eat it too. In Greatest Movie, he gleefully accepts his sponsorships on camera just to show you how wrong this all is.
  33. 70
    It's surprising that The Greatest Movie Ever Sold plays so entertainingly, given that Spurlock's quest is essentially beside the point.
  34. Reviewed by: Justin Chang
    Apr 19, 2011
    70
    A consistently amusing and not entirely vacuous stunt.
User Score
7.1

Generally favorable reviews- based on 21 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 6
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 6
  3. Negative: 1 out of 6
  1. May 16, 2011
    9
    This time, doc director Morgan Spurlock takes product placement to the ultimate level. He determines to finance the film entirely fromThis time, doc director Morgan Spurlock takes product placement to the ultimate level. He determines to finance the film entirely from sponsors and we are treated to his process. Turns out it's is not just informative, but highly entertaining. Full Review »
  2. Aug 31, 2014
    3
    Morgan Spurlock is not a skilled filmmaker. Why should we expect to be entertained by his next venture in selling crap cinema? Documentary orMorgan Spurlock is not a skilled filmmaker. Why should we expect to be entertained by his next venture in selling crap cinema? Documentary or not, it's not interesting, Morgan. Full Review »
  3. Feb 27, 2013
    7
    The film is perhaps too light-hearted and not as cutting as it needs to be but it retains its message throughout, albeit to different extents.