Metascore
60

Mixed or average reviews - based on 9 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: Two young men develop graffiti into an urban art form on the streets of San Francisco’s Mission District, only to face prosecution and the prospect of imprisonment. A former at-risk kid himself, director Benjamin Morgan's connection to the underground youth of today provides the film with its gritty realism and "drama verite" style. (Quality of Life Film, LLC) Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 9
  2. Negative: 1 out of 9
  1. 75
    Kev Robertson's gritty camerawork and a musical soundtrack mixing hip-hop, punk and electronica add to the ambience of this impressive shoestring-budget indie.
  2. Reviewed by: Jane Ganhal
    75
    This is a small -- if rough -- gem of a film.
  3. 70
    It's Garrison and Burnam who hold the film's center, however, with a natural magnetism. Newcomers both, they take the same clean approach to their roles that their characters bring to their tags.
  4. Reviewed by: Nathan Lee
    60
    A minor movie, modestly made, that develops to a counterculture beat but ends with a status quo conundrum: Is selling out the new keeping it real?
  5. 60
    Establishes a strong sense of milieu in these street scenes, and while the movie's not without its flaws--much of the dialogue is colorless and Lisa seems a bit too together to be hanging out with Curtis--it's never less than credible.
  6. Reviewed by: Mark Olsen
    60
    The ending, which unnecessarily veers toward lumpy, overwrought melodrama, undoes the scrappy elegance the film previously displays in fits and starts.
  7. Reviewed by: Phil Hall
    30
    With a clumsy hip-hop score permeating every free inch of the soundtrack and ugly 16mm cinematography that would never be allowed out of Film School 101, the audio-visual experience is a wreck. The quality of Quality of Life is non-existent.

See all 9 Critic Reviews