Ratatouille

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8.6

Universal acclaim- based on 1324 Ratings

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User Reviews

  1. JoannaB
    Aug 31, 2008
    10
    Absolutely loved this movie! I did not know what to expect, but this movie was just such a joy to watch. The animation,the message..a great family movie. It will not disappoint!
  2. JS
    Nov 28, 2009
    7
    This movie had high expectations, it did not hit them for me. The animation was good, it was funny in parts, had a good storyline and was fun to see them cook, but it was missing the 'wow factor'.
  3. JesseJ
    Dec 18, 2009
    10
    Best pixar ever made. The most beautiful music and atmosphere that makes you want to cry.
  4. LukeH
    Jul 17, 2009
    9
    The only reason I watched this film is because my friend made me and, to be honest, i was expecting it to be another one of those films that Disney have recently begun spewing up as an excuse to make money. But this film is brilliant. It's funny, clever, pretty and has characters that you find yourself genuinely caring about. Unlike most other Disney films that have turned up since The only reason I watched this film is because my friend made me and, to be honest, i was expecting it to be another one of those films that Disney have recently begun spewing up as an excuse to make money. But this film is brilliant. It's funny, clever, pretty and has characters that you find yourself genuinely caring about. Unlike most other Disney films that have turned up since we hit the year 2000 (like Chicken Little, Lilo and Stitch and every straight to DVD movie) it doesn't rely on promotion to make it popular instead of actually producing a good film. Expand
  5. JimT
    Aug 28, 2009
    10
    Pixar takes chances with every one of their movies. Some things stay the same - great storytelling and impeccable animation among them - but the company is not afraid to risk. And they almost always come through. This movie is brilliant in its color and delicious in its presentation. It's getting so I can't pick out my favorite Pixar movie any more, they get better and better. Pixar takes chances with every one of their movies. Some things stay the same - great storytelling and impeccable animation among them - but the company is not afraid to risk. And they almost always come through. This movie is brilliant in its color and delicious in its presentation. It's getting so I can't pick out my favorite Pixar movie any more, they get better and better. I've narrowed it down to about six, that number is subject to change every year. Expand
  6. MrToad
    Dec 23, 2007
    10
    Excellent. Far outshines the other Pixar films. No obvious flaws, apart from the suspension of disbelief caused by a weird hair disorder of the human lead. I really liked this movie.
  7. DavidM
    Dec 27, 2007
    7
    Its a good and entertaining movie, but I find it to be very overrated, If this is the best movie of the year I don't want to watch the rest.
  8. TylerD.
    Dec 31, 2007
    10
    Jessica G: It's called an opinion. Not everyone loves every single movie you love the exact same amount. Different people have different tastes.You're going to have a hard time in life if you expect everyone to agree with you all of the time. Anyways, without further ado, Ratatouille was a fantastic, heartwarming movie. I definitely don't regret watching it.
  9. DanielF
    Nov 25, 2008
    10
    I'm in high school and its my favorite movie of all time, but it strangely seemed not to get as much attention as the other pixar movies. Wall-E was almost as good.
  10. Oct 31, 2010
    8
    not my favorite movie, but it has great entertainment, great writing, and most of all: great animation.

    Rating: 85%
  11. Jun 6, 2016
    10
    This movie hits an excellent balance of humor and emotion. Remy is a great protagonist, the kitchen staff is fun, and the critic has the single best monologue of any character in any Pixar film. The movie isn't perfect, but it is definitely good enough to earn a 10/10; the slower moments are made up for by the quality of the rest of the film.
  12. Jul 16, 2013
    9
    Ratatouille is probably my favorite Disney movie of all time. It's both cute and funny. It scores points for having a great villain and an even sweeter hero... But most of all, it has an unforgettably cathartic finish that gets me every time.
  13. Apr 2, 2011
    7
    It does not matter where you come from, if you have a talent and love to do it you can achieve your dream. The movie shows tensions between family and career but resolves it by depicting that they can also go hand in hand. One of the big intentions of the filmmakers is to make the viewers losen up their preconceptions and narrow mindedness. Above all the Ratatouille aims to convince thatIt does not matter where you come from, if you have a talent and love to do it you can achieve your dream. The movie shows tensions between family and career but resolves it by depicting that they can also go hand in hand. One of the big intentions of the filmmakers is to make the viewers losen up their preconceptions and narrow mindedness. Above all the Ratatouille aims to convince that rats are also beings that deserve to be treated with respect (even if they steal sometimes). Another obvious theme related to food is making the viewer in times of fast food mass production aware that there is more to food than just getting your tummy full with little time, little money, and little taste. Even though all the characters have diverese and highly developed personalities, and the protagonists are cute and the story fun, it is not until the final climax of the movie that there is a scene that truly grabs you at your emotional core and makes you really happy. Ratatouille is a very nice addition to collection of the Pixar's animated feature films. Go watch it! Expand
  14. Jan 30, 2011
    7
    Pixar has never made a bad movie, but this is one that I did not think was as good as people made it sound. In fact, I think it is far overhyped. Sure, there is still some of the charm and good characters you come to expect, but the pacing of the movie brought this down for me making this movie just good, but not great.
  15. Feb 24, 2011
    10
    He visto Ratatouille muchas veces, la califico como el mejor trabajo de Pixar-Disney, y eso que es muy dificil determinar cual de todos los trabajos de Pixar es el mejor, para mi gusto Remy, Et-Al deberian de tener mejor calificacion. Felicidades.
  16. Jan 30, 2014
    10
    One of my favorite animated films, but to say, my favorite. Thanks to "Ratatouille" I became the family chef. From beginning to end the story of Remy is surprising. Definitely a movie with a huge quality. Tomatoes, onions and bread only far from millimeters to be considered real. It is a true copy of Paris and customs. Clearly, a film you must watch before you die.
  17. Jul 27, 2011
    8
    I've loved every film Pixar has made, and this is no exception. The animation is excellent, and so is the humor. This film, like every one of Pixar films, is a fun treat for kids and adults. It is totally worth buying on DVD or Blu-Ray. But while it's better than Cars and A Bug's Life, it still does not meet the standard of Toy Story and Finding Nemo. It's a great film, not a masterpieceI've loved every film Pixar has made, and this is no exception. The animation is excellent, and so is the humor. This film, like every one of Pixar films, is a fun treat for kids and adults. It is totally worth buying on DVD or Blu-Ray. But while it's better than Cars and A Bug's Life, it still does not meet the standard of Toy Story and Finding Nemo. It's a great film, not a masterpiece like Brad Bird's two other films: The Incredibles and The Iron Giant. So yeah. It's a very good movie. Expand
  18. Jun 28, 2012
    10
    It is a great film full of human emotion with an extremely well told story which is always pixar's strongest point. We deeply care for these characters which is what interests the viewer and makes the film truly memorable. The ending is nothing short of greatness. It brings all the themes and together with parallel scenes and humour.
  19. Dec 11, 2011
    9
    Animated by the breathtaking visuals that you would expect from a Pixar film and inspired by a rich, charming narrative, "Ratatouille" is as delicious as it sounds.
  20. Dec 8, 2011
    10
    I love absolutely everything about this film. It is Pixar's finest standalone film, which is saying something. I love the story, comedy, voice acting, animation and the fact that (sorry) some of the characters actually look like they're from France. Seriously, I cannot fault this film.
  21. Nov 6, 2011
    10
    Ratatouille is clever, witty and beautifully animated. One of Pixar's finest achievements since the first Toy Story back in '95. This movie makes me hungry!!!! 4/4 stars.
  22. Nov 21, 2011
    10
    Even after seeing this Pixar movie for the BILLIONth time, I'm not sick of it. This is definitely one of Pixar's best works. The cuisine mixed in with the film's plot, and how Pixar used animation to create the most GORGEOUS looking Paris I've seen in a film, animated or not. SEE THIS FILM.
  23. Jul 2, 2013
    10
    As our unexpected hero Remy remarks in the film, "pure poetry" is quite the summing up of this miraculous film from Pixar, one of their best and most unorthodox to date. The film was not necessarily taken with great admiration upon its announcement, due to its content and of course its name. But what the film expertly does is refer to the name, and outline exactly the point its trying toAs our unexpected hero Remy remarks in the film, "pure poetry" is quite the summing up of this miraculous film from Pixar, one of their best and most unorthodox to date. The film was not necessarily taken with great admiration upon its announcement, due to its content and of course its name. But what the film expertly does is refer to the name, and outline exactly the point its trying to make, it isn't suppose to be appealing, and not to judge a book by its cover.
    The character of Remy is a rat, a rat with quite the heightened sense of smell, and with a taste for the finer things in life, namely the elegant cuisine of France, something which he is exceptionally good at creating.
    But when the chef and restaurant he idolises fall on hard times, he happens across the very place and witnesses a new dishwasher accidentally ruining a soup, Remy steps up to fix the problem. The dishwasher, Linguini, sees Remy cooking and the two decide to work a solution for Remy to take, for the fact that the rest of the restaurant staff believe the dishwasher is the expert cook.
    The film is a tale of pursuing what you want to do, and not to let anyone tell you any different. But the realism, while still ridiculous, is given a nice effect, as Remy and his human puppet realise he won't be accepted, therefore their carefully orchestrated means of cooking must be invisible to everyone else.
    The film is perhaps the most insightful and viewer-inspired creation from Pixar, full of messages and situations that a real life individual will face in their ongoing existence, family, love, trial and error and of course...success.
    As expected, the film is a visual delight, from the Paris skyline to the animation of Remy the rat working in the kitchen, each and every character, including the rats, have a distinct and unique look, setting them and their traits aside from the next person. A witty and hilarious script also benefits this excellent film, visual gags are in place across the film and the pacing of our characters is relevant to the story, especially working in a french restaurant.
    Ratatouille will never cease to surprise and exceed, it answers many questions surrounding acceptance and hard work, all true while making the point of enjoying and escaping in its wonderful world, reminding us that we can get by little help from our friends.
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  24. Jan 10, 2012
    10
    This movie is a perfect work of art describing something that we humans don't generally like to come across. But I think the world may have forgotten that this has the "Pixar Touch." It's one of those movies that changes your perspective about something. In my case, food. And as Gusteau says, "Never let someone define your limits because of who you are or where you come from."
  25. Apr 20, 2015
    8
    Certainly not Pixar's most laughable film to date, Ratatouille features a flawlessly executed concept and story in the world of Paris. In addition to its stunning animated visuals, you'll find above-standard voice acting from talented actors such as Ian Holm and Patton Oswalt. Although a little light on food content, I regret having waited this long to see this one.
  26. Apr 30, 2012
    10
    This is one of the best animated movies ever done, in the same spirit of hard work that Disney studios is famous for soon to be, a century. An original story with twists and turns that keeps you interested until the last frame. A must see for every cinephile and animation scholar.
  27. Nov 15, 2013
    9
    "Ratatouille" is a classic Pixar animation and a fantastic accomplishment. The animation is brilliant (as usual), it's well-directed, the script is intelligent and is consistently humorous. Pixar movies are textbook examples on how to make films for both kids and adults.
  28. Jan 3, 2013
    10
    Finally had the time to get around watching this film, and I wished I watched this sooner. It was an enjoyable experience - with loveable characters and brilliant animation.
  29. Nov 10, 2013
    9
    This was fun movie with drama and romance altogether
    be aware that you might get hungry while watching it :))
    I think in the long run it's a re-watchable animation suited for people of different ages
    I'd totally advise you buy it, make tons of delicious food, sit there and watch it
  30. Jan 7, 2016
    8
    Featuring Pixar's trademark heartwarming story, Ratatouille is a brilliantly voiced, brilliantly designed/animated, and incredibly well-written film that really warms your heart and keeps you entertained throughout. With just light reliance on the occasional comedic element, Ratatouille is a wonderfully imaginative tale about a rat who dreams of becoming a chef. A story of both followingFeaturing Pixar's trademark heartwarming story, Ratatouille is a brilliantly voiced, brilliantly designed/animated, and incredibly well-written film that really warms your heart and keeps you entertained throughout. With just light reliance on the occasional comedic element, Ratatouille is a wonderfully imaginative tale about a rat who dreams of becoming a chef. A story of both following your dreams to the fullest and that your surroundings and who you are do not define, but rather what you do with them, Ratatouille is entirely moving. It also manages to avoid being heavy handed throughout, which is definitely a plus. As a whole, Ratatouille is so brilliantly animated, it really wows you with the stuff they were able to pull off. An absolute Pixar classic, this one is both extremely entertaining and touching. Expand
  31. Oct 3, 2013
    8
    At first thought, a film that combined rats and cooking would deem itself as an off-putting topic, but with Pixar being Pixar, they worked it to its best. They enhanced the classic encounters of vermin and restaurants by providing an enjoyable feature which honed the moral for being adventurous and different, as well as the balance of work and relations.

    This original feature doesn't
    At first thought, a film that combined rats and cooking would deem itself as an off-putting topic, but with Pixar being Pixar, they worked it to its best. They enhanced the classic encounters of vermin and restaurants by providing an enjoyable feature which honed the moral for being adventurous and different, as well as the balance of work and relations.

    This original feature doesn't fall short with humour, although less than their average inclusion, the humour is by lack of a better phrase humorous.

    I am glad to say that Pixar has once again (by adapting their own quote) ‘surprised me’, and I hope they continue to do so in the future.
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  32. Jul 22, 2012
    9
    One of the most amazing kids movie ever. The animation is amazing. It's such a perfect film and you can watch as many times as you want and it never gets boring. Good for adults and children.
  33. Dec 24, 2012
    8
    Original, well done, and well written this is sure to dazzle kids and adults.Lesson for everybody: Kid films shouldn't be bad for teens and adults. This movie has charm to it. I liked it, but I didn't love it. It's a good movie, and certainly Pixar's classic group.
    Diagnosis: Please see this film!
  34. Jan 3, 2014
    10
    Divertido e com uma pitada de emoção isso o que define essa maravilhosa obra de arte de Pixar um dos melhores filmes já feitos nos últimos e porque não nos últimos tempos.
  35. Jul 31, 2015
    7
    A cute, polished, rousing adventure with slapstick and visual splendor for kids, as well as wit and cleverness for adults. "Ratatouille" is yet another win for Pixar and Brad Bird.
  36. May 10, 2013
    7
    Great animation! Probably one of the best choices you can make if you're going to watch it with your family,friends or even alone! Superb quality Pixar project! If you haven't seen it and you're a hardcore Disney fan or just a person who loves animations. Do it now! My final score is 7/10
  37. Jun 25, 2013
    9
    This film is a cinematographic masterpiece, comprising all the key elements of feel-good fun. Inspirational and delightful in its transmitting of the key messages which are cleverly interwoven into a thoroughly entertaining plot, the lovable characters simply slot perfectly into place, telling the unusual though very original story in true Disney style.
  38. Mar 27, 2013
    8
    Very good animation and story line. Creativity was visible throughout the film, although the addition of Gusteux's ghost was a bit corny. The ending was't the best, but at least the bad guy didn't win.
  39. Jan 6, 2014
    7
    The best thing about the movie, is that it showcases Pixar's "mantra" that being story, story ...story. That along with having great characters/animation/dialog, which you just forget or never even consider are digital puppets.

    The humor was great too, the gags situations character acting all contributing to making situations that "kids of all ages could "get". There is on one
    The best thing about the movie, is that it showcases Pixar's "mantra" that being story, story ...story. That along with having great characters/animation/dialog, which you just forget or never even consider are digital puppets.

    The humor was great too, the gags situations character acting all contributing to making situations that "kids of all ages could "get".

    There is on one level the entire story, of Remy and Linguini, but then there are 3 or 4 or more subplots and a number of dramatic scene changes which almost felt like separate chapters of the main story. That all contributed ..for me at least... to keeping the movie very interesting right to the end.
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  40. Jul 22, 2013
    10
    "Ratatouille" is clever, imaginative, gorgeous, breathtaking, and proves Pixar's integrity. The film itself is of course wonderfully animated and characters are new and inventive. Remy, the protagonist, is a dreamer, who is extremely likable and is wonderful to see his growth. Side characters have a definite lasting impressions, as the love story of Collete and Linguini is a bit cliche,"Ratatouille" is clever, imaginative, gorgeous, breathtaking, and proves Pixar's integrity. The film itself is of course wonderfully animated and characters are new and inventive. Remy, the protagonist, is a dreamer, who is extremely likable and is wonderful to see his growth. Side characters have a definite lasting impressions, as the love story of Collete and Linguini is a bit cliche, but is still a wonderful side plot to enjoy. The film may seem a bit quirky, but the quirkiness braced is spectacular and original. With a wonderful message that tells us that "great artists can come from anywhere", "Ratatouille" leaves a long and wonderful lasting impression that ranks to the Pixar standard of ingenuity. Expand
  41. Jul 6, 2014
    9
    It has charm yet isn't mawkish so I have to roll me eyes or cover my ears for any stupid or ridiculous scenes. Insightful, with a lot of heart, it's a Pixar film for the whole family and even some adults. What can I say? It has a lot of pizzazz!
  42. Sep 19, 2013
    10
    Even though it's rated G, this film has such an adult way of playing out and is very sophisticated. It is a melting pot of a movie. You get a little bit of French cooking, the secret ways of how a restaurant operates, you get a feel for 1930's Paris, and most importantly you feel the clique between Linguine and Collette. All of these elements come together in one helluva movie.
  43. Oct 31, 2013
    7
    after making a not good film the pixar animation studios get right one more time again with this good film,but the people overrating this film a little bit.
  44. Nov 13, 2013
    8
    Ratatouille cooks up a fine film.
    Once again a very solid piece by Pixar, good story, a few laughs, and an unbelievable emotional connection between human and animation.
  45. Oct 26, 2015
    10
    Absolutely perfect. One of the best cartons ever made. Despite Disney is advertised as f*ck, none of their sh*t content is as good as this masterpiece.
  46. Feb 14, 2014
    8
    Astonishing and Amazing. A film to leave someone in awe and possibly begging for more. This is a Pixar film to treasure from start to finish. Every second of it.
  47. Mar 15, 2014
    7
    bard bird has a great imaginations and stories to for his animation films like incredibles . i thought paris films all they do is speak french but i am glad i didnt see people speaking different language . this was and film to understand
  48. Jun 29, 2014
    10
    Charming, gorgeously animated, fantastically voiced and another appealing Pixar movie that goes to my collection of "My Favorite Animation Movies". Recommendable for all ages.
  49. Sep 28, 2014
    9
    A great Pixar animation that I have watched countless times before, the story of a rat helping a French man fulfil his dream of becoming a chef, a fantastic film for all the family, and has tons of re-watch-ability too!
  50. Oct 19, 2014
    10
    Nobody in Hollywood today could make a story about a rat so fun and entertaining, other than the guy who made The Incredibles, Brad Bird. Great film worthy of all the awards it got.
  51. Oct 13, 2014
    9
    Definitely one of those films that you’d have to eat before watching it. Besides that the film delivers well and the story is solid, Pixar really got the look and the movement of the rats right as well as the cooking shown in the film. Although there is a downfall that the character of Linguini is kind of a doofus and not really that memorable. In conclusion the movie is great and I wouldDefinitely one of those films that you’d have to eat before watching it. Besides that the film delivers well and the story is solid, Pixar really got the look and the movement of the rats right as well as the cooking shown in the film. Although there is a downfall that the character of Linguini is kind of a doofus and not really that memorable. In conclusion the movie is great and I would put it somewhere in the middle, it’s not my least favourite but it leans up against my favourite Pixar films. Expand
  52. Oct 19, 2014
    10
    Welcome to a entirely new and original world where the unthinkable combination of a rat and a 5-star gourmet restaurant come together for the ultimate fish-out-of-water tale.
  53. Mar 28, 2015
    8
    Pixar's latest installment is a recipe of success. Ratatouille is bold and classy with the flare of European culture. Patton Oswalt's adventurous critter spices a flamboyant film with an interesting plot and dynamic delivery.
  54. Mar 17, 2015
    10
    If I had to choose my favorite Pixar filmmaker that isn't John Lasseter, it's definitely going to have to be Brad Bird. He has shown such enthusiasm for the motion pictures, I find it hard not to like him.

    'Ratatouille' is the second Disney-Pixar project directed by him, and to be honest, I had my doubts, for reasons obviously. First of all, this movie is released after Pixar's first
    If I had to choose my favorite Pixar filmmaker that isn't John Lasseter, it's definitely going to have to be Brad Bird. He has shown such enthusiasm for the motion pictures, I find it hard not to like him.

    'Ratatouille' is the second Disney-Pixar project directed by him, and to be honest, I had my doubts, for reasons obviously.

    First of all, this movie is released after Pixar's first mediocre (but not terrible) effort 'Cars' (2006), the one Disney-Pixar film nobody raved about, and it fared well with critics and audiences, but it isn't universally loved like 'Toy Story' (1995) or 'Finding Nemo' (2003). Plus, Brad Bird's earlier effort was 'The Incredibles' (2004) which EVERYBODY (including myself) loved and to go from superheroes, to making a movie about a rat who cooks in a kitchen and everybody eats the food seems like a downgrade.

    Yes, you heard right, the premise for this movie is a rat that cooks in a kitchen and everybody eats the food. If you pitched this idea to anyone else, including live-action filmmakers, they would laugh in your face. Ratatouille is an example and a demonstration of how there is no limit to the imagination when it comes to the art form of animation. You could come up with something outrageous or obnoxious, and animation will always be there to make it possible.

    Patton Oswalt voices a rat named Remy, who, with his family, is always looking out for food, you know, like most rats. He discovers one day that food can taste amazing when you combine two different flavors that complement each other.

    He is in France and learns that his favorite chef Gusteau (voiced by Brad Garrett) has passed away and the legacy of his restaurant is owned by an evil chef who cannot be trusted. Remy runs into a young, new employee at the restaurant named Linguini (Lou Romano) and they sort of come to an agreement that Linguini can prove himself to work at the restaurant as long as Remy does the cooking, underneath his hat.

    When Remy starts treating Linguini like some ventriloquist by tugging on his hair, this leads to some funny sequences where he often trips and moves with such flexibility thanks to the art form of animation.

    Peter O'Toole voices the fearsome food critic Anton Ego, who can get Gusteau's restaurant shut down if he criticizes the next dish and gives it a bad name.

    Obviously Remy's family of dirty rats isn't happy with what he's doing so far, his father is unsure and uncomfortable about him working with humans due to the fact that we can kill rats since they're small creatures we can easily stamp on. Remy's brother Emile (Peter Sohn) is a very funny comic relief for the movie the same way Dory was for 'Finding Nemo' (2003).

    'Ratatouille' is easily one of the best films of 2007, and that's saying something. It's funny because this movie left me craving for a sequel, which I will accept will probably never get made, but if it does, I'm hopping into the front seat.

    For a movie that's about a rat who cooks in a kitchen and everybody eats the food, I did find it to be more intelligent than...say 'Transformers'? But that's just me.

    Brad Bird really is a gift at Disney-Pixar.
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  55. Mar 22, 2015
    10
    10/10 ................................................................................................................................................
  56. Apr 25, 2015
    10
    Delicious and entertaining, Pixar writer Brad Bird reaches the height of his La Vie en Rose career, with a beautiful masterpiece of the self-discovery of the unexpected talent within non-humans especially in the hands of a lone rat, whose only hope for survival is becoming a chef in one of Paris' most critically acclaimed restaurants, despite the odds and intolerance.

    Its a sweet film
    Delicious and entertaining, Pixar writer Brad Bird reaches the height of his La Vie en Rose career, with a beautiful masterpiece of the self-discovery of the unexpected talent within non-humans especially in the hands of a lone rat, whose only hope for survival is becoming a chef in one of Paris' most critically acclaimed restaurants, despite the odds and intolerance.

    Its a sweet film thats like champagne bottles flowing simultaneously into the atmosphere and the smell of grapes in the air.
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  57. Apr 11, 2015
    9
    a very good movie from Pixar. the story is great the charters are good the animation is good it just a really good movie to watch this movie..........
  58. Apr 24, 2015
    9
    Describe the plot of Ratatouille to most and they’ll likely turn up their nose as if assaulted by a bad smell. It’s about a rat who yearns to be a chef. That’s not cute, that’s not flip and postmodern. Couldn’t we make it a giraffe who wants to play golf, or a hippo who dreams of being a stunt-hippo, or a gerbil who aspires to play lead guitar in a heavy-metal band (please note,Describe the plot of Ratatouille to most and they’ll likely turn up their nose as if assaulted by a bad smell. It’s about a rat who yearns to be a chef. That’s not cute, that’s not flip and postmodern. Couldn’t we make it a giraffe who wants to play golf, or a hippo who dreams of being a stunt-hippo, or a gerbil who aspires to play lead guitar in a heavy-metal band (please note, second-tier animation studios - these concepts are copyright Empire)? What’s cool about a rat in a kitchen? Isn’t it, like, kinda gross?

    Au contraire, mes amis. After five minutes of Ratatouille you start getting excited about the time when you can buy it on DVD to use as life therapy, like a soothing bath or a dose of Librium. It may be Pixar’s masterpiece, but why quibble over niceties when they keep delivering stories this rich?

    Even amongst the Hawaiian-shirted big brains of the Pixar think-tank, Brad Bird is taking on an auteurish hue for the fabulousness of his creations.

    It’s farce and poetry both, able to make thrilling gearshifts from poignant characterisation into madcap as the film spills onto the streets to create chase sequences worthy of Chuck Jones or Fred Quimby. Visually, nothing is beyond these guys. From the fineness of Remy’s fur to the rain-slicked cobbles of the City Of Lights, they somehow grant synthesised surfaces the textures of life. Yet, the animation is at once extraordinary and hardly the point. So deft is the hand of Pixar that you are allowed to take their raptures of detail for granted - the incidental art is slave to the story. Pixar are not really animators at all, but storytellers par excellence whose carving knife happens to be a computer mouse.

    By the third act, the standard recipe would be for Linguini to be de-toqued, the diminutive hero exposed and the villainous Skinner to be felled. That, though, is just one of the plot strands Bird has woven. Amid the flurry of impeccably timed disaster, Anton Ego will emerge from his coffin-shaped parlour to test this unforeseen turn-around at Gusteau’s and prove a salutary lesson for any critic as to their own worth. “Surprise me,” he sneers to the waiter, with the kind of disdain normally associated with Lady Bracknell or Daily Mail readers. So fully have you sunk into this animated world, so blurred are its joins with real life, that the resulting dish (designed with the help of hip chef Thomas Keller) lifts the film to rank alongside Babette’s Feast, Big Night or Ang Lee’s Taiwanese trilogy as literally mouth-watering. Although it rather takes the Happy Meal
    tie-in off the agenda.

    It is impossible not to read Remy as a straight metaphor for Bird or Pixar as a whole. They are unable to let the soup sour when the perfect mix of flavours can be reached. But the message may be more democratic - not everyone can be a great artist, but true art can come from anywhere. Bird is an artist who looks deep into humans (even in rat form) and sees something magic. His films feel like gifts.

    That feeling you have as you leave the cinema - that buzzing in the fingers and lightness in the heart - is called joy.
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  59. Mar 6, 2016
    10
    “Ratatouille” is delicious. In this satisfying, souffle-light tale of a plucky French rodent with a passion for cooking, the master chefs at Pixar have blended all the right ingredients — abundant verbal and visual wit, genius slapstick timing, a soupcon of Gallic sophistication — to produce a warm and irresistible concoction that’s sure to appeal to everyone’s inner Julia Child. Though“Ratatouille” is delicious. In this satisfying, souffle-light tale of a plucky French rodent with a passion for cooking, the master chefs at Pixar have blended all the right ingredients — abundant verbal and visual wit, genius slapstick timing, a soupcon of Gallic sophistication — to produce a warm and irresistible concoction that’s sure to appeal to everyone’s inner Julia Child. Though the latest crowd-pleaser from “The Incredibles” writer-director Brad Bird arguably reps a harder sell than earlier Disney/Pixar toon outings, the combo of critical excitement, energetic word of mouth and shrewd marketing should make this family-friendly feast a gastronomical success worldwide.

    After the less than universally admired “Cars,” Pixar’s eighth feature sees the Disney-owned toon studio in very fine form, and confirms Bird’s reputation as one of the medium’s most engaging storytellers. Compared to his woefully underseen “The Iron Giant” and Oscar-winning “The Incredibles,” “Ratatouille” may be smaller in scope, but in telling the story of a very smart rat striving to enter the very human world of French haute cuisine, it shares with its predecessors an affinity for gifted outsiders seeking personal fulfillment.

    Pic also extends two of the great themes of “The Incredibles”: the pursuit of excellence over mediocrity (a standard that has long distinguished Pixar from rivals and imitators) and the importance — or rather, the unavoidability — of family ties. Remy, a thin blue rat who lives with his unruly rodent clan in the French countryside, finds himself torn between these two commitments as the film opens.

    Blessed with unusually sharp senses, Remy (voiced by comedian Patton Oswalt) is educated, cultured and mad about creating his own culinary master-pieces — the complete opposite of his tubby, good-natured brother Emile (Peter Sohn) and gruff dad Django (Brian Dennehy), who are content to wallow in trash and disapprove of Remy’s all-too-human higher ambitions.

    After an unfortunate cooking mishap, the rats are evicted from their rural nest and forced to escape through the sewers — where, in the first of many nim-bly orchestrated action sequences, Remy is separated from his family. He winds up in Paris, near a restaurant once presided over by the legendary chef Auguste Gusteau, whose populist motto (“Anyone can cook!”) rings in Remy’s ears as he spies longingly on the bustling kitchen activity.

    One busy evening, Remy can’t resist sneaking in and spicing up a vat of soup; credit for the delicious dish goes to the poor garbage boy, Linguini (Lou Romano), a clumsy, stammering type with no talent for cooking, who is immediately ordered by conniving head chef Skinner (Ian Holm) to reproduce his success.

    While man and mouse experience difficulty communicating at first, they ultimately agree to team up, a la “Cyrano de Bergerac”: Linguini can keep his job, and Remy can slice and dice to his heart’s content. The result is a classic odd-couple comedy in which Linguini and his “little chef” must learn to work together, avoid discovery and, inevitably, deal with the internal and external pressures that threaten their unlikely partnership.

    Among those threats are the kitchen’s lone female, Colette (a tough-talking but tender Janeane Garofalo), whom Linguini inevitably falls for; the up-to-no-good Skinner, who’s both suspicious and jealous of Linguini’s success; and an uber-acerbic restaurant critic, aptly named Anton Ego (a sneering Peter O’Toole), who once ruined Gusteau’s reputation.

    Premise was originally conceived by Jan Pinkava (who left Pixar before the project’s completion but is credited here as a co-director) before Bird took over the reins — a transition that may explain why some of the secondary characters and subplots feel a tad rote, particular in the more manic later stretches, though the overall execution is never less than involving.

    But “Ratatouille” is at its finest in the kitchen, as Remy learns to whip up sauces and sweetbreads while directing Linguini’s movements from beneath the latter’s cap. The joy of artistic creation is both palpable and infectious, and Bird and his supremely inventive team of animators and designers respond in kind — giving viewers a glimpse of mouth-wateringly realistic cuisine one moment, dazzling them with some delightfully Keaton-esque slapstick the next.

    Wide-ranging score by Michael Giacchino (“The Incredibles”) stays perfectly in sync with the action, encompassing string- and accordion-based Gallic overtones as well as a light percussion that suggests the scampering of rat paws.

    Pic is preceded by an amusing Gary Rydstrom-directed short, “Lifted,” which cheekily imagines a driver’s ed lesson aboard a UFO.
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  60. Dec 2, 2015
    9
    Ratatouille arrives , another masterpiece from Pixar , which I managed to give the pinch of family entertainment , the highlight of the summer 2008. contemporizes the sweet taste of victory in a great work of Pixar , and which couando always take new ideas, always they come out better than ever , in fact this dish was exquisite.
  61. Jan 4, 2016
    9
    Appealing as ever, Ratatouille developed once again another great Pixar film that's considered both the best film of 2007 and the best animated film of 2007.
  62. Jan 4, 2016
    9
    Does anyone really want to see a film about a rat – you know, one of those promiscuous, verminous beasts who haunt sewers and spread deadly disease – working in a restaurant? On paper, hell no. From Pixar, yes with (dinner) bells on. Ratatouille overcomes any intrinsic ick-factor thanks to the bottomless charm of its teeny rodent hero, Remy (voiced by US comic Patton Oswalt). With itsDoes anyone really want to see a film about a rat – you know, one of those promiscuous, verminous beasts who haunt sewers and spread deadly disease – working in a restaurant? On paper, hell no. From Pixar, yes with (dinner) bells on. Ratatouille overcomes any intrinsic ick-factor thanks to the bottomless charm of its teeny rodent hero, Remy (voiced by US comic Patton Oswalt). With its plate-wide eyes, pencil-eraser nose and ability to make the omelette of your dreams, this mini master chef couldn’t be cuter if its name was Nigella. Witness the turning-point scene where hapless gourmet-diner garbage boy Linguini (Lou Romano) quizzes the far-from-home critter (who understands English, but only speaks it with his own species) on his culinary talents: Remy’s adorably coy nods and self-deprecating shrugs prove yet again that Pixar has no peer when it comes to nailing the nuances of expression.

    Yes, Ratatouille thinks small, but with big results. Scripter/director Brad Bird rolls back the sweep of The Incredibles and doesn’t shoot for The Iron Giant’s emotional swell. Instead, he whips up a deceptively frothy soufflé. And, like any great cook, he knows that the trick lies in keeping all the ingredients in delicate balance. So there’s the sweet but not too sickly buddy-buddy relationship (a Pixar staple) between Linguini and Remy, the former becoming the toast of the town as he covertly channels the latter’s flair for French cuisine (via some deft hair-pulling puppetry) into new, delicious dishes. There’s also the obligatory moral (“Anyone can cook”), gently stirred in rather than shoved down the throat. And then we have the meaty chunks of chase action, Remy scampering through the niftily choreographed chaos like a four-pawed Buster Keaton (usually in flight from his Napoleonic nemesis, Ian Holm’s head chef Skinner).

    The pace never gets as overheated as the similarly ratty Flushed Away, though; after all, we are in dreamy Paris, a place-setting Bird lushly romanticises (dewy by day, coruscating by night) without going in-Seine. In fact, he’s not above a sly pop at the locals: “We hate to be rude... but we’re French,” quips Linguini’s tough-cookie love interest Collette (Janeane Garofalo). Ratatouille’s biggest beef, however, is with pernickety hacks, embodied here by poisonous, cadaverous restaurant reviewer Anton Ego (a super-snooty Peter O’Toole). As the film winds down, it fires up a from-the-heart polemic against professional critics. A pre-emptive attack, perhaps, after the mixed notices for last year’s Cars? Retaliation seems unlikely, though; while few will grade this among Pixar’s best (over-generous running time; solid but – O’Toole aside – unexceptional lung-work; one or two belly-laughs short), it’s too sophisticated, zesty and nourishing to be dismissed as fast-food entertainment. Anyone can cook? Not like this.

    Novel in concept, exquisite in execution, another family feast from Pixar suitable for all palates. Not a studio chef d'oeuvre, perhaps, but still the richest of this year's animations. Don't miss the starter course, hilarious space short Lifted.
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  63. Jan 6, 2016
    10
    Describe the plot of Ratatouille to most and they’ll likely turn up their nose as if assaulted by a bad smell. It’s about a rat who yearns to be a chef. That’s not cute, that’s not flip and postmodern. Couldn’t we make it a giraffe who wants to play golf, or a hippo who dreams of being a stunt-hippo, or a gerbil who aspires to play lead guitar in a heavy-metal band (please note,Describe the plot of Ratatouille to most and they’ll likely turn up their nose as if assaulted by a bad smell. It’s about a rat who yearns to be a chef. That’s not cute, that’s not flip and postmodern. Couldn’t we make it a giraffe who wants to play golf, or a hippo who dreams of being a stunt-hippo, or a gerbil who aspires to play lead guitar in a heavy-metal band (please note, second-tier animation studios - these concepts are copyright Empire)? What’s cool about a rat in a kitchen? Isn’t it, like, kinda gross?

    Au contraire, mes amis. After five minutes of Ratatouille you start getting excited about the time when you can buy it on DVD to use as life therapy, like a soothing bath or a dose of Librium. It may be Pixar’s masterpiece, but why quibble over niceties when they keep delivering stories this rich?

    Even amongst the Hawaiian-shirted big brains of the Pixar think-tank, Brad Bird is taking on an auteurish hue for the fabulousness of his creations (The Incredibles being the last).

    He remains intent on interpreting the foibles and grace notes of the species to which he belongs, even if it is through the medium of a rat. His latest quest is to decipher the soul of an artist who rises from the lowliest place: quite literally the sewer. Remy, not content to eat garbage like his brothers, has the very un-rat-like urge to soothe his palate with extraordinary tastes. He is a gourmand and, having spied the cooking programmes of famed but recently deceased Parisian chef Auguste Gusteau (Brad Garrett), is now entranced with the idea of creating transcendent meals that mix flavours like the giddy riffs of jazz. Gusteau is of the opinion
    that “anyone can cook”. And a rat is listening.

    To Remy, humans are an inspiration (“They taste...” he marvels. “They discover...”). To humans, Remy is vermin. A complicated state of affairs, especially when fate washes the talented rat into Paris, right next door to the late Gusteau’s classy eatery, currently suffering a downturn in fortune. Vulpine food critic Anton Ego (a character designed with Peter O’Toole’s Gothic tonsils fully in mind)
    has been less than favourable, but Remy is drawn to the bustling kitchen like a pilgrim to the Holy Land.

    Impeding his nascent greatness, apart from being a rat, are Gallicly tempered and vertically restricted head chef Skinner (Sir Ian Holm), and Remy’s sceptical rat-father (Brian Dennehy), who is determined he pursue more rat-like endeavours (like eating garbage). But as Brad Bird has it, art will out. Remy is slave to his own genius.

    Scampering fretfully among the whirling ladles, carving knives and angry spurts from the gas burners, his delicate nose sniffs out the insulting scent of compromised soup and he can’t help but risk life and paw to remedy the dish. To leave it would be a sin against his soul.

    The answer to his troubles is to go undercover, or under-toque, in cahoots with the supremely untalented new garbage boy Linguini (Lou Romano). This presents Bird and his animators with an awkward challenge - how does their world actually work? Their answer is anthropomorphic sleight-of-hand. Remy doesn’t talk: well, he does, but only in rattish, and it just so happens that we’re fluent. Linguini, his partner, doesn’t. All this bumbling fool can make out are the tinny squeaks of rat-kind. To confer the rat-chef’s talents to his goofy human sidekick, Bird goes one fictional step further, making Remy capable of operating a human being by tugging his hair follicles like puppet strings. The animated are now doing the animating.

    It’s an inspired concept, transforming the cooking sequences into astonishingly animated slapstick homages to Mack Sennett, Buster Keaton and, in keeping with the French setting, herky-jerky French farceur Jacques Tati (a kind of proto-Bean), as Linguini is manipulated to concoct paradise in dish form.

    Visually, nothing is beyond these guys. From the fineness of Remy’s fur to the rain-slicked cobbles of the City Of Lights, they somehow grant synthesised surfaces the textures of life. Yet, the animation is at once extraordinary and hardly the point. So deft is the hand of Pixar that you are allowed to take their raptures of detail for granted - the incidental art is slave to the story. Pixar are not really animators at all, but storytellers par excellence whose carving knife happens to be a computer mouse.

    It is impossible not to read Remy as a straight metaphor for Bird or Pixar as a whole. They are unable to let the soup sour when the perfect mix of flavours can be reached. But the message may be more democratic - not everyone can be a great artist, but true art can come from anywhere. Bird is an artist who looks deep into humans (even in rat form) and sees something magic. His films feel like gifts.

    That feeling you have as you leave the cinema - that buzzing in the fingers and lightness in the heart - is called joy.
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  64. Jul 6, 2016
    9
    Once again disney pixar does it again with us this time following a rat named remey who just wants to be a chef. This movie, like most pixar movies delivers a strong story.
  65. Feb 11, 2016
    9
    Very fun and lovely film!! An adventurous film about a passionate rat who seeks his way to make something. Beautiful story and a little bit bizarre, but in a good way.

    Watch it here for free: https://www.primewire.ag/watch-616-Ratatouille-online-free
  66. Mar 5, 2016
    8
    I love this film, best animated film I've ever seen. Pulls at the heart strings and can make you cry even when it's not at it's saddest. They need to make more films like this.
  67. Mar 23, 2016
    10
    Ratatouille brings a familiar message, with unforgettable characters, inventive and "delicious" story-telling, full of fun, enjoyable contents and inventive plot, despite the simple animation. Here's another Pixar classic that no one will forget. Enjoy!!
  68. Mar 31, 2016
    10
    I absolutely love this movie . i love how it teaches everyone cleanliness when it comes to cooking is very important , i also love how it teaches people to never give up on your dreams and passions . i love cooking so i connect on that level . i also find it amusing that rats are associated with disease , filth and disgusting features and lifestyle.
  69. May 10, 2016
    9
    Probably one of the most outlandish ideas as far as the culinary world goes (a rat cooking?!), but this is one beautifully visualized film. I loved the characters, and despite the cliched subplots that wove together to make the film what it is (no details without spoilers), it never quite felt unbelievable. Recommended for children and adults alike.
Metascore
96

Universal acclaim - based on 37 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 37 out of 37
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 37
  3. Negative: 0 out of 37
  1. Reviewed by: Richard Corliss
    100
    The subtle colors and textures of the food alone make Ratatouille a three-star Michelin evening.
  2. 100
    In Ratatouille, the level of moment-by-moment craftsmanship is a wonder.
  3. 100
    This is clearly one of the best of the year's films. Every time an animated film is successful, you have to read all over again about how animation isn't "just for children" but "for the whole family," and "even for adults going on their own." No kidding!