Cinema Guild | Release Date: April 29, 2005
7.0
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 7 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
5
Mixed:
0
Negative:
2
Watch Now
Stream On
Stream On
Review this movie
VOTE NOW
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Check box if your review contains spoilers 0 characters (5000 max)
8
ChadS.Mar 21, 2007
There's no jump-cuts, or anything particular deconstructionist about "A Tout de Suite", but the breathtaking effect that black and white photography has on Islid LeBesco, helps the viewer imagine what this ingenue would look like in one There's no jump-cuts, or anything particular deconstructionist about "A Tout de Suite", but the breathtaking effect that black and white photography has on Islid LeBesco, helps the viewer imagine what this ingenue would look like in one of Jean Luc Goddard's lovers on the lam films(such as 1965's "Pierrot le fou") during the iconoclast's heyday. As Lili, LeBesco is absolutely spot-on in portraying how the love of a nineteen-year-old girl would transform her from an art student to a fugitive of the law. LeBesco is one of only a handful of actresses who can pull off the trick of being both erotic and sweet. We shouldn't feel sad for the beautiful, but when Lili is betrayed by her hooligan lover, that radiant glow on Le Besco's face disappears and you're a little startled by how vulnerable she suddenly looks. "A Tout de Suite" then tells a different kind of story. Finding herself suddenly alone, we see how men and women gravitate, or is that prey, on the young and beautiful. We saw heart, but these people just want her body. If you see "A Tout de Suite", you'll see a star in the making, and the most ravishing use of black and white photography since the Coen Brothers' "The Man Who Wasn't There". Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful