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8.5

Universal acclaim- based on 496 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 12 out of 496
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  1. Jan 22, 2014
    8
    It's not the racing that will keep you on your seat, It's the great acting by Bruhl and Hemsworth that make this film all worth while. Bruhl was perfect and Hemsworth proved that is not only a very good actor but also capable of breaking from his type-cast roles as well. Ron Howard once again proves why he is one of Hollywood's top directors as well. Very well done film and I wouldIt's not the racing that will keep you on your seat, It's the great acting by Bruhl and Hemsworth that make this film all worth while. Bruhl was perfect and Hemsworth proved that is not only a very good actor but also capable of breaking from his type-cast roles as well. Ron Howard once again proves why he is one of Hollywood's top directors as well. Very well done film and I would definitely recommend it. Expand
  2. Sep 2, 2014
    7
    Another brilliant contender of the year! It's incredible how Ron Howard can take a subject not necessarily fascinating to all and make it all the more interesting. All of this backed by two great lead performances.
  3. Oct 4, 2013
    6
    In 1976, two Formula One drivers became prominent rivals. Charismatic English playboy James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) and dull, disciplined Austrian Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl). This is basically a surface biopic about one year in their lives with lots of unoriginal or thrilling racing footage. Director Ron Howard went with arty camerawork and edgy editing, but it only serves to disguise theIn 1976, two Formula One drivers became prominent rivals. Charismatic English playboy James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) and dull, disciplined Austrian Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl). This is basically a surface biopic about one year in their lives with lots of unoriginal or thrilling racing footage. Director Ron Howard went with arty camerawork and edgy editing, but it only serves to disguise the flat filmmaking. The performers are fine and their story does gain momentum in the last third, but that's a lot of mileage (literally) before it becomes involving. Expand
  4. Sep 20, 2013
    10
    "Rush" is an awe-inspiring story filled with nail-biting, fast-paced racing scenes and it's right up there with some of Ron Howard's best films. While you might go into "Rush" thinking it's going to be Hemsworth's show, it's Daniel Brühl's unforgettable performance as his rival that has the most impact
  5. Dec 28, 2013
    8
    Ron Howard does an excellent job at showing the rivalry between the two men and their personal lives. Rush has brilliant cinematography that brings the races to life and keeps you on the edge. Its pure entertainment.
  6. Oct 6, 2013
    8
    With a crackling script from Peter Morgan, a stylishly invigorating directorial turn from Ron Howard, and two superb performances from Hemsworth and Bruhl, "Rush" easily proves its worth as probably the most notable nonfiction sports chronicle this side of "The Fighter."
  7. Dec 28, 2013
    9
    This is what a respectful rivalry looks like. Ron Howard does a fabulous job of depicting this two totally different men on and off the track. The on track scenes are very well done looking very realistic no sugar coating the dangers. A
  8. Jan 5, 2014
    7
    Rush is exciting with some fascinating characters that you actually care about. It is a solid movie that is just a tad long. Ron Howard directs with ease and lets the story tell itself.
  9. Jun 21, 2014
    7
    This one was pretty good as a whole. Daniel Bruhl absolutely killed his role here and really stood out for me in this one. The race sequences are expertly put together to make them very intense and thrilling, plus the sound mixing for the cars and the racing was great. In addition, I felt like the 1976 season was covered very well, even as a non-Formula 1 fan. I may be ignorant to thingsThis one was pretty good as a whole. Daniel Bruhl absolutely killed his role here and really stood out for me in this one. The race sequences are expertly put together to make them very intense and thrilling, plus the sound mixing for the cars and the racing was great. In addition, I felt like the 1976 season was covered very well, even as a non-Formula 1 fan. I may be ignorant to things they may have missed, but what they showed was very satisfying and felt like it covered a good bit of information. However, I cannot say the same for the stuff before they get into 1976. The foundations of the rivalry and both drivers' personal lives before 1976 were shown, but poorly put together at best as things seemed to be "rush"ed through and it ultimately left me feeling very unsatisfied. For the first bit of the film, things seemed to happen with no background to them and it almost felt like the film was just skipping from one unrelated scene to another. Luckily, this problem goes away once they get into 1976, but before that, it is a bit messy. For that, it hampered my overall enjoyment a bit, but as a whole, the film is pretty good and very good entertainment. Expand
  10. Sep 25, 2013
    7
    It's a good, solid action flick, but not nearly as good as Senna from a few years back. Supporting characters are merely ok. Daniel Bruhl as Nikki Lauda is an interesting and compelling figure that I wanted to know more about. His on-screen wife Alexandra Maria Lara is striking and outstanding, as usual. The visuals are extremely slick if you have any interest in the sport, definitelyIt's a good, solid action flick, but not nearly as good as Senna from a few years back. Supporting characters are merely ok. Daniel Bruhl as Nikki Lauda is an interesting and compelling figure that I wanted to know more about. His on-screen wife Alexandra Maria Lara is striking and outstanding, as usual. The visuals are extremely slick if you have any interest in the sport, definitely check it out. Just keep your expectation in check it's not a transcendent story. Expand
  11. Nov 23, 2014
    9
    Way to go Ron Howard! Rush is likely my favorite movie of 2013. I love the rivalry between the two racers and this is a story that I had no prior knowledge on so I didn't know what to expect in the ending. Both main characters go through some significant development throughout the movie. I would recommend Rush to any sports fan.
  12. Mar 8, 2014
    10
    Before watching the film, I thought this was going to just be a silly car racing movie, with no real point whatsoever. After watching, I realized I was completely dead wrong. This movie is exciting, well-directed, well-acted and it is fantastic. Director Ron Howard does the tension incredibly well in this movie. Definitely a recommendation.
  13. Sep 21, 2013
    9
    You don't have to be a fan of formula 1 racing, if you like great acting with a great script and tremendous back-and-forth rivalry, then you'll love this movie. Overall, it's an interesting rivalry. Be sure to check out my YouTube channel, "TheMovieManLife" for all things movies.
  14. Sep 27, 2013
    7
    “Rush” is the true story of Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl), Formula One race car World Champ, an Austrian born, disciplined, mind on the prize, controlled and controlling of his life and career versus James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) a womanizing, smoking, drinking, charismatic, dope taker who loved the spotlight, claimed to have bedded over 5,000+ women and wanted to take that World title from“Rush” is the true story of Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl), Formula One race car World Champ, an Austrian born, disciplined, mind on the prize, controlled and controlling of his life and career versus James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) a womanizing, smoking, drinking, charismatic, dope taker who loved the spotlight, claimed to have bedded over 5,000+ women and wanted to take that World title from Lauda. The first hour of the film concentrates on their rivalry, most of all their differences, leading up to to 1976 when the last race would determine who was the champ.

    As an example of the difference between the two men we meet Suzy Miller (Olivia Wilde) who Hunt proposes marriage after knowing for her for a minute and two years later she leaves him and marries Richard Burton while Lauda meets Marlene (Alexandra Maria Lara) and his marriage proposal to her seems more of well thought out decision to become part of his all work and no play. Marlene’s steadfast belief in Lauda changes the latter’s life and leads to the horrific and hero building second half of the movie.

    Director Ron Howard, with the help of director of photography Anthony Dod Mantle and the editors Dan Hanley and Mike Hill, takes you into the center of the cars, and the races, to the point you almost feel you know what the drivers feel behind the wheel whether it be driving in bright sunshine or beating rain hitting your helmet. As Marlene is shown being given and plugging in ear plugs it might not hurt for you to bring a pair to the theatre. In addition to the deafening sound of the racing cars there is additional, unnecessary, noise added by the music of Hans Zimmer on the soundtrack.

    Peter Morgan, who wrote the screenplay, shows you the difference between Hunt and Lauda and will have you rooting for one and then the other but he fails in not giving a payoff to that rivalry for the audience to cheer and though there are other characters on screen he doesn’t really give them any depth but they bring more to the screen than written. Alexandra Maria Lara gives off more looks than words but her looks are meaningful while Olivia Wilde is a portrait of a 1970s jet setter. Members of the race teams add realism to the film and Pierfrancesco Favino, as real race car driver Clay Regazzoni, who competed with Hunt and Lauda, provides humor and heft when each is needed. Chris Hemsworth shines as James Hunt and Daniel Bruhl as Nick Lauda matches him as an opposite who seems to carry the world on his shoulders. The two actors carry the movie on their shoulders and do an excellent job.

    Don’t forget to bring earplugs and some of you get ready to take your eyes from the screen during the crash and hospital scenes! Keep in mind it is a movie!
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  15. Nov 10, 2014
    9
    Rush is a very stylish and slick sports drama that features very strong performances from Daniel Brühl and Chris Hemsworth along with realistic high-octane race sequences.
  16. Jan 13, 2014
    10
    Ron Howard, the master of biographical picture maker. As I know of him, he never failed to transform biographical stories into a movie. In fact, many of his movies are my favourites. This time he picked up a true story of two rivalry formula 1 drivers from the 70s. This biographical sports drama was nothing short in all the aspects compared to his earlier movies. So his legacy continuesRon Howard, the master of biographical picture maker. As I know of him, he never failed to transform biographical stories into a movie. In fact, many of his movies are my favourites. This time he picked up a true story of two rivalry formula 1 drivers from the 70s. This biographical sports drama was nothing short in all the aspects compared to his earlier movies. So his legacy continues with a series of masterpieces in his filmography. I am always fond of his works because the mix of sentiments in his movies is powerfully appealing just like I wanted. The emotion tool was very wisely utilized in this movie as well.

    The races from the movie were shot awesomely with the old automobile models and sets around. It was a perfect direction utilizing this inspiring true story with two great actors. It won't only tells about races but also the inexplicable friendship between them, which is hard to predict as we are not they. As per my observation I did not detect any flaws, especially races were exceptionally shot, totally to-notch. From the fast pace story narration due to the fine editing to background score and visual effects, we must recognize the A1 quality of the production house.

    This movie portrays about the 1976 Formula 1 season where two new comer drivers from Europe, James Hunt and Niki Lauda are considered the top rivalries to grab the world championship title. So their's stunning entry from lower class race to the big event, the clash between them were exhibited very well. Two equally great drivers with different mantras in their life as well implement in the race track was just mind blowing. The story was told from the perspective of both of them where narration frequently switches.

    Initially I was not favour to give it a shot. The reason behind it was the Chris Hemsworth, I am not a big fan of his performance. Most of his movies are commercially feel good kind ones so I was a bit hesitated to put my faith in this. And a couple of Ron Howard's last movies as well not like I expected but was just good. This movie completely reformed these two guys and redefined their's capability once again. Regretting for not saw it earlier, but feels good that I did not miss it after all. A highly recommended movie, which was one of the best sports movie from 2013 along with '42'.

    9.5/10
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  17. Mar 21, 2015
    8
    Telling the story of the classic rivalry between James Hunt and Niki Lauder Rush is further prove that real life can be just as intriguing and exciting as any story the movie industry can devise. Anchored by excellent performances from Chris Hemsworth and Daniel Bruhl Rush is a must watch for fans of Formula One.
  18. May 25, 2014
    8
    It's amazing how Ron Howard went from directing The Dilemma to directing this. Having watched The Dilemma I was thinking maybe he had lost it but man was I wrong Rush is an amazing movie and a thrill ride. A true story about two top notch rivals James Hunt(Hemsworth) and Niki Lauda(Brühl) in Formula 1 racing. An amaing movie with fantastic story telling and amazing effects. James Hunt is aIt's amazing how Ron Howard went from directing The Dilemma to directing this. Having watched The Dilemma I was thinking maybe he had lost it but man was I wrong Rush is an amazing movie and a thrill ride. A true story about two top notch rivals James Hunt(Hemsworth) and Niki Lauda(Brühl) in Formula 1 racing. An amaing movie with fantastic story telling and amazing effects. James Hunt is a guy that lives for the moment and likes to have a great time and Niki Lauda a more calulated person who thinks every step out. Overall I give it a 8.2 Rush was a great time and I will for sure be buying it on blu ray. Oh yeah and Olivia Wilde is the amazing to look at so that is always a plus. Expand
  19. chw
    Aug 16, 2014
    10
    Rush is absolutely the best Ron Howard movie ever made. Unlike his other movies like Apollo 13 and A Beautiful Mind, there is never a dull moment in Rush.
  20. Jan 7, 2014
    10
    Rush definitely lives up to its name. The way it pumped blood through my head gave me a rush. But quite a few movies manage to do that, and it was solely not for this that I liked the movie. I loved its art direction. It got me believing that I really was looking through a window into the 70s and witness this rivalry replayed.

    There are quite a few movies out there vying for our
    Rush definitely lives up to its name. The way it pumped blood through my head gave me a rush. But quite a few movies manage to do that, and it was solely not for this that I liked the movie. I loved its art direction. It got me believing that I really was looking through a window into the 70s and witness this rivalry replayed.

    There are quite a few movies out there vying for our attention. They have thrilling car races or chases, and the intention is only that_ to amaze us with the mind-boggling stunts. But Rush endeavoured to be much more than a film about racing cars. It wanted to make us experience how these drivers live, why they choose this profession, how they feel during the time they are behind the wheel, and how much victory means to them. In that task Rush has succeeded beyond my expectations. It set out to do something I had not even expected of it. So it sets itself apart and should be taken more seriously.

    Rush is narrated by Niki Lauda (Daniel Brühl) at key moments of his career. His rivalry with James is spun out of context by the frenzied media. Surely they don't see eye to eye but when such levels of adrenaline are pumping through your veins and you risk everything to gain victory, even the slightest setback makes you envy and loathe your opponent to the extreme.

    Both the main characters start off as rookies. Their first encounter and tussle may be fictionalised. Both of them are stupendously talented. But they must make their mark in order to gain attention from the big names in the game. Drivers finish the race but the ones making them the heroes in the public eye are the ones with the cars. And they would have to vie for names such as Ferrari and McLaren to even begin to have some kind of a chance to be among those who finish first.

    I found the acting sufficient for the believability of the characters. James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) came across as the universal bad boy with a heart of gold. He certainly has the charisma to pull it off. Lauda was much more complex. He is clearly the type who aim high in life and are willing to do everything to achieve their goals. So Brühl had his work cut out for him but he surprised and rose to the occasion. There are their other sides which are gradually revealed and make them more human and thus more worthy of admiration. It was nice to see Olivia Wilde given a role in a movie that was not a box office bomb or a disaster with the critics.

    We are shown glimpses of races around the world intertwined with scenes from the private lives of these two men. The racing scenes were short and well captured. The character development was well done and certainly painted distinct personalities. They joke and verbally spar in their own ways, calling each other names to incite angry responses. No one's the bad guy. They shuffle as the more sympathetic character throughout the movie. I'm glad they didn't resort to add more conflict and contrived fictional gimmicks to offset each other to add drama, which would have ruined it for me. I was constantly waiting for this to happen, for it to slip up and reveal mediocrity, even expecting it, for it is a film about cars, but I was pleased to be proven wrong.

    You can have a thrilling movie about car racing or you could have a movie about the lives of drivers with sparse action, but Rush combined both perfectly. Everything was in the right proportions. It had the story, the entertainment value, the mood-changing quality and the effects. The races were brilliantly done. The accidents when they happened were rightly worrying and realistic and not exaggerated. The cars themselves were pure beauties. And I found myself agreeing with the line of dialogue that men love cars more than they love women.

    I dare say that Rush has succeeded in supplanting all car racing movies I had previously watched and become my favourite from the genre. But the reason I loved it is it made me think about the importance of human life and why it must not be risked for thrill seeking and for the entertainment of others who do not have the guts to perform such kinds of feats.
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  21. Dec 31, 2013
    9
    Rush is a very stylish and slick sports drama that features very strong performances from Daniel Brühl and Chris Hemsworth along with realistic high-octane race sequences.
  22. BKM
    Oct 14, 2013
    5
    Ron Howard's glossy, commercial approach doesn't serve the subject matter well in Rush. At its core the film is a character study about the rivalry and contrasting personalities of two drivers who fueled each others desire to dominate their sport. The two men are fascinating and deeply flawed individuals consumed by the adrenaline rush provided by their chosen professions, but HowardRon Howard's glossy, commercial approach doesn't serve the subject matter well in Rush. At its core the film is a character study about the rivalry and contrasting personalities of two drivers who fueled each others desire to dominate their sport. The two men are fascinating and deeply flawed individuals consumed by the adrenaline rush provided by their chosen professions, but Howard shoehorns everything into a conventional sports flick with a tidy ending. It could have been so much more. Expand
  23. Jan 5, 2014
    9
    Ron Howard's best film in years, Rush is also one of the best film of 2013. Great drama, exciting action scenes...it really portrays the risk and toll of this sport on its 'heroes', the cool playboy Hunt and the calculating genius Lauda. Highly recommended.
  24. Sep 30, 2013
    8
    Was not expecting much going into the theater, but was pleasantly surprised. Ron Howard captures the rivalry really well and always keeps the story in a believable tone. The 70's washed out color scheme sets a great mood with these sets. I just wish this movie would make more money at the box office. It is a quality film much better than so many others released this year. Maybe it will getWas not expecting much going into the theater, but was pleasantly surprised. Ron Howard captures the rivalry really well and always keeps the story in a believable tone. The 70's washed out color scheme sets a great mood with these sets. I just wish this movie would make more money at the box office. It is a quality film much better than so many others released this year. Maybe it will get a few awards later bringing it more attention. Expand
  25. Mar 3, 2014
    9
    Very interesting! Very well directed! Emotional, I highly recommend watching this movie! It was over 2 hours! But I wasn't bored with it! It kept me on the edge of my seat till the very end!
  26. Sep 29, 2013
    9
    "Rush" is one of the best films of the year. I was pleasantly surprised by the amount of depth and emotional story telling this film possess. From its brilliant script that infuses humor, drama, and a story about a fascinating rivalry to its impeccable and detailed oriented direction, this film succeeds on every level.

    Ron Howard’s direction is extremely noteworthy as I felt like a part
    "Rush" is one of the best films of the year. I was pleasantly surprised by the amount of depth and emotional story telling this film possess. From its brilliant script that infuses humor, drama, and a story about a fascinating rivalry to its impeccable and detailed oriented direction, this film succeeds on every level.

    Ron Howard’s direction is extremely noteworthy as I felt like a part of the journey and involved with the characters as I cheered them on. In the beginning, I was rooting for James, but as the movie progresses and things unravel, I was cheering for Niki. However, as the movie moves forward, I couldn’t choose one over the other. This is the type of engagement that I love in movies, it keeps the audience involved and contently thinking about every situation and the characters as a whole.

    This film is well edited and shot as well. I couldn’t find a useless or uninteresting moment in this film. Everything flowed very well and the film moved at a brisk pace. It felt as every shot or sequence is catered to moving and developing the characters and their story forward. The racing sequences are well shot and make you feel a part of the race. My heart rushed when characters successfully made narrow life endangering turns. It is a really good film to look at as the scenery and environment crafted feels inviting and absorbing.

    The cast in this film is superb. Chris Hemsworth gives his finest performance to date as a carefree playboy. Even though his character James Hunt doesn’t appear serious, he struggles with his inner demons trying to be taken a bit more seriously. Daniel Bruhl also gives and equally impressive, if not better, performance as Niki Lauda an arrogant self-absorbent racer. It’s interesting to see his character go from caring only about himself and racing to something more important. The greatest aspect of the characters are their interactions. I really enjoy how they can’t stand each other, but can’t be successful without each other either. While they hate one another, they find a mutual respect for the other. It’s quite endearing to see how they have each others back off the tracks.

    Overall, “Rush” is an amazing movie and totally worth your time. It’s a movie that has everything, from drama to humor to love. The greatest aspect of the film is its truly brilliant and masterful score by Hans Zimmer. His score gives the right amount of emotional punch along with improving everything we see and giving the film a greater amount of importance. I give this film an extremely high 4.5/5, a well oiled film that has no wasted parts.
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  27. Jan 18, 2014
    10
    The only racing I get interested in usually involves the words “kart” and “Mario” but I was shocked by how much I enjoyed “Rush.” The story about Hunt’s and Lauda’s rivalry during the 1976 Formula 1 racing season is interesting enough but the performances from Chris Hemsworth and Daniel Brühl are just impossibly good. Add that with fantastic visual and heart-pounding race sequences andThe only racing I get interested in usually involves the words “kart” and “Mario” but I was shocked by how much I enjoyed “Rush.” The story about Hunt’s and Lauda’s rivalry during the 1976 Formula 1 racing season is interesting enough but the performances from Chris Hemsworth and Daniel Brühl are just impossibly good. Add that with fantastic visual and heart-pounding race sequences and the film ended up being far better than I thought it could have been. Expand
  28. Oct 5, 2013
    10
    Simply, one of the best movies ever made!!! I have already watched it 2 times!!!! Pure entertainment, pure rush!!! Watch it!! Go see it!!! It's absolutely wonderful!!!
  29. Feb 17, 2014
    8
    In a voiceover during Rush, we hear the voice of Formula 1 race car champion James Hunt (played by Chris Hemsworth): “I have a theory why women like racing drivers. It's not because they respect what we do, driving round and round in circles. Mostly they think that's pathetic, and they're probably right. It's our closeness to death.” That quote is not only a telling description of theIn a voiceover during Rush, we hear the voice of Formula 1 race car champion James Hunt (played by Chris Hemsworth): “I have a theory why women like racing drivers. It's not because they respect what we do, driving round and round in circles. Mostly they think that's pathetic, and they're probably right. It's our closeness to death.” That quote is not only a telling description of the personality of the character of James Hunt, as depicted in the film, but it also describes the absurd philosophy behind the “rush” of race car driving, and probably any other sport that involves mortal danger. It is the thrill that attracts a certain kind of personality to this dangerous sport, and sadly it may also be the thrill that attracts thousands of spectators.

    The morbid appeal of a struggle to the death goes back to ancient sacrificial rites and the gladiatorial games of ancient Rome. There is something fascinating about seeing an athlete who stands before the crowds knowing that he must look death in the face and that he may very well lose the battle. It is the misguided sense of valor, courage, and destiny normally reserved for soldiers and knights, who at least are willing to sacrifice themselves for a noble cause—they are ready to die for country, king, faith, and family. Military courage is the stuff of heroes and protectors, but race car driving? Not really.

    The 20% mortality rate mentioned in the film may have improved since the 1970's. Apparently safety measures have been stepped up so that race circuits are much safer than they were 10-20 years ago; the Formula 1 design has also been improved for safety, although the open cockpit of the car still presents a danger to the driver, while proposals to cover the cockpit are controversial. Thirty-two Formula 1 drivers have died during a World Championship Grand Prix, the last one being Brazilian driver Ayrton Senna who died in 1994 at the San Marino Grand Prix. The count goes up to 50 if you include drivers who were killed during lesser events (the last death in 2002), and that figure does not include marshals and other bystanders who have been killed on the track.

    The film tries to delve beneath the obvious reasons that race car drivers are attracted to the sport, which would be an obsession with automobile mechanics and design as well as an obsession with speed. The story revolves around two historic Formula 1 titans—British driver James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) and Austrian driver Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl). Hunt is a dashing hedonist who is addicted to cars, women, cigarettes, and alcohol; Lauda is by contrast a stoic, who is quiet, dedicated, and believes that true success lies in the strictest form of discipline. If Hunt is a playboy, Lauda is a monk (although Lauda says he was not as strict as depicted in the film.) They are both attracted to the sport but come armed with completely opposing philosophies. For Hunt, the racetrack is a forum for attention, celebrity and the sensual experience of life; it is his temple for living in the moment and seizing the day. For Lauda, the racetrack is a different kind of temple, one that demands an almost religious reverence and meditation, and where he connects to the deepest part of his soul. The two men are both rivals and friends, and the film doesn't mention that in real life they were once roommates.

    Ron Howard's film sets out not just to dramatize a significant race year in the lives of both drivers, but to show how the two differing philosophies affected them both on and off the track. Lauda suffered devastating burn injuries to his face and lungs in a Grand Prix accident of 1976, which caused him to be disfigured for life. He went into a coma and almost died after that race, but then he mustered up the intense will and discipline for which he was known, and he climbed back into his Formula 1 Ferrari just six weeks after the accident, which was nothing short of a miracle. James Hunt achieved his dream of becoming a Grand Prix champion that same year, and a few years later left the sport to become a commentator. Hunt, a heavy drinker and smoker, died of a heart attack at the age of 45.

    In another voiceover, this time by the character of Niki Lauda, who in real life won three Grand Prix championships and is now 64 and retired, we hear these words as he speaks of the race that changed him forever: “The other thing I'm remembered for is what happened on August 1, 1976, when I was chasing him [Hunt] like an a**hole.” And that line, perhaps better than anything else, aptly describes the philosophical absurdism of car racing.
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  30. Nov 11, 2013
    7
    Loud, proud, and relentless in its portrayal of sport rivals, Ron Howard’s Rush is another entry into his formulaic and conventional directing resume. Like any well oiled machine, Howard is an expert of giving audiences a fundamentally linear narrative with striking and beautiful aesthetic choices, even if the narrative follows the rivalry between two Formula One drivers whose careers andLoud, proud, and relentless in its portrayal of sport rivals, Ron Howard’s Rush is another entry into his formulaic and conventional directing resume. Like any well oiled machine, Howard is an expert of giving audiences a fundamentally linear narrative with striking and beautiful aesthetic choices, even if the narrative follows the rivalry between two Formula One drivers whose careers and competition is anything but straight-cut.

    Rush isn’t the best film of the year by far, and in terms of narrative the film suffers from clichéd plot-points, predictable sport film tropes and by-the-book autobiographical rules, but one of the highlights of Rush is the effortlessness of telling the story of two incredible men’s lives, without making one or the other the lead protagonist or antagonist. Rush is the true story of two passionate and talented drivers whose race to becoming the Formula One World Champion is something quite unbelievable.

    The film begins in the middle of its narrative, at the beginning of the 1976 German Grand Prix in Nürburgring, mere moments before Niki Lauda (Daniel Brühl) experiences what is suspected to be a rear suspension failure that hospitalized him for a month and a half. We then flashback to 1970 at a Formula Three race in the Crystal Palace circuit in England where the rivalry between Lauda and James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) begins. Destined to be rivals since their initial meeting, the film follows the trails and tribulations of Lauda and Hunt’s fight to the Formula One circuit. Lauda, a mechanical genius who uses his skills on cars to earn his spot beside Clay Regazzoni (Pierfrancesco Favino) and the Scuderia Ferrari racing team, shows skill as a engineer but suffers socially, proving to be somewhat inept when it comes to interacting with people. While Hunt, an unapologetic, globetrotting playboy, seems to have no problems interacting with his fans (maybe a little too often). Where Hunt lacks for meticulous calculations and mechanical understanding, things Lauda posses, Hunt makes up for in raw talent, ambition and “balls”.

    The film chronicles not only an intense rivalry set in the dangerous world of Formula One Racing, but the film also depicts a rivalry of wits between two men, who suffer and sacrifice so much for respect in a world inhabited by high-adrelanline, death-defying racers.

    Rush is definitely a return to form for Howard, who, after the problematic and chaotic The Dilemma, had a lot to prove aesthetically and narratively. Aesthetically, Howard had his wheels spinning uncontrollably with inspiration. From the film’s 1970′s grainy look, to its very artistic slow-motion racing scenes (which acts as a nice irony to the sport), to the choice of camera angles when covering the pivotal scenes of the race, usually shooting at a very low angle, Howard does use the film to solidify his place as a stylistic filmmaker again, as he did previously with Cinderella Man, Apollo 13 and A Beautiful Mind.

    Howard surrounded himself with the best this time around, and made no mistakes. With a modest $38 Million budget for a Hollywood film, Howard was able to create an high-octane Formula One film, grounded as a character piece. Written by Peter Morgan (The Queen), shot by Anthony Dod Mantle (Slumdog Millionaire), Scored by Hans Zimmer (The Dark Knight trilogy), and produced by film-extraordinaire and longtime collaborator Brian Grazer, Rush is assembled just like any other team in the Formula One meticulously and strategically.

    It also did not hurt that Howard was able to get Hemsworth out of Nordic armour and deliver his finest performance to date. The real star of the film is Brühl. Underrated and overlooked since his career-defining role in Tarantino’s Inglorious Bastards, Brühl inhabits his rat-like character and shows the intolerable side of a man obsessed with perfection, discontent with happiness, and who shows no emotional response to the fast pace world which exists around him. Brühl’s transformation into Lauda is one that will hopefully be acknowledged come award season.

    Rush is a good film. More of a solid entry into the autobiographical sport genre, much like 42 earlier this year, the film lacks an intensity most great sport films have, which is the intensity of the sport itself. Some of the greatest sport movies ever made use the sport to elevate character progression, intense emotion or moments that audiences cheer for. There was never a rousing moment of triumph, pleasure or extreme emotion with our characters that took place on the racetrack. Unfortunately for the film, some of the best scenes happen on the streets of Italy, in the hospital, or in restaurants and furnace rooms where the characters grow and evolve; the racetrack is just a forum for winning.
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Metascore
75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 43 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 38 out of 43
  2. Negative: 1 out of 43
  1. Reviewed by: Kyle Smith
    Sep 30, 2013
    75
    Rush, though it will win no trophies, is fine filmmaking, a smart, visually engorged, frequently thrilling tale of boyish competition — inspired by a true story. At heart it’s “Amadeus” on wheels, only this time Salieri is the Austrian.
  2. Reviewed by: Marc Mohan
    Sep 30, 2013
    75
    The result is a solid film, but one that remains more interesting than intense.
  3. Reviewed by: Anthony Lane
    Sep 27, 2013
    80
    Still, it is a writer's privilege to trim and tailor at will, and everybody loves a duel. It would take the dullest of curmudgeons not to enjoy the surge of this saga, accurate or not, and the excesses of what already feels like a distant age. [30 Sept. 2013, p.84]