User Score
8.1

Universal acclaim- based on 36 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 32 out of 36
  2. Negative: 3 out of 36

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  1. Jul 6, 2013
    10
    A visual and audio experience you will never forget, and a wordless meditation on life on earth in all its beauty, grandeur, and horror. Here, the images do all the talking. And if they make the Wall Street Journal uncomfortable, all the better.
  2. Jan 12, 2013
    9
    Shot over 5 years in 25 countries on 65mm film stock and then scanned at 8K you can imagine this film looks absolutely incredible! There is no dialogue or story, but just a cool flow of beautiful tracking- and/or time-lapsing shots put to ambient music with perfect vocals by Lisa Girrard. Like Baraka or Koyaanisqatsi you will either be utterly borred or almost be moved to tears. AShot over 5 years in 25 countries on 65mm film stock and then scanned at 8K you can imagine this film looks absolutely incredible! There is no dialogue or story, but just a cool flow of beautiful tracking- and/or time-lapsing shots put to ambient music with perfect vocals by Lisa Girrard. Like Baraka or Koyaanisqatsi you will either be utterly borred or almost be moved to tears. A masterpiece in my book for sure :D Collapse
  3. Dec 2, 2012
    9
    This was a great movie, I saw it twice just to take my other friend. Whoever these critics are need to be FIRED. This was a beautiful movie, there's couple parts that were a bit odd and a little strange. But this is a very good, well done, beautiful movie. Also all done without speaking a word. Well done.
  4. Oct 23, 2012
    10
    This film is billed as a "guided meditation", and it really is one. If you approach it as such it's absolutely wonderful. But you have to stay with it, and like in meditation, allow your active pursuit of patterns and connections to fall away.
  5. Sep 11, 2012
    9
    If only for the sound, see this film. If only for the way that time-lapse allows us to see the chaos of modern cities, see this film. If only for the way that it makes the viewer recognize the ways in which our lives are more manufactured than they have ever been, see this film.
  6. Aug 30, 2012
    9
    Samsara is an incredible collection of moving images, a poignant portrayal of human life in the third millennium. It covers the humorously absurd, the depressingly cruel, and stunningly beautiful traits of being a human. Almost every shot in this film is something you've never seen before, even if it's a shot of a local Costco, or highway. The camera's lens captures what the human eyeSamsara is an incredible collection of moving images, a poignant portrayal of human life in the third millennium. It covers the humorously absurd, the depressingly cruel, and stunningly beautiful traits of being a human. Almost every shot in this film is something you've never seen before, even if it's a shot of a local Costco, or highway. The camera's lens captures what the human eye can't see. I'd agree that sometimes it is a little didactic, and relentless with its social criticism, but you won't mind because you'll be too busy soaking up everything you're seeing. The human subject is never treated as a pawn in the filmmaker's argument, instead every pair of eyes is allowed to exist in front of yours. A spectacle in every sense of the word. Expand
Metascore
65

Generally favorable reviews - based on 24 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 13 out of 24
  2. Negative: 1 out of 24
  1. Reviewed by: Rene Rodriguez
    Sep 21, 2012
    75
    Achingly beautiful and visually transfixing, Samsara offers a transporting vacation from the usual multiplex fare. It's a movie to get lost in.
  2. Reviewed by: Randy Cordova
    Sep 13, 2012
    40
    The film winds up being a collection of striking visuals without any emotional heft.
  3. Reviewed by: Marjorie Baumgarten
    Sep 13, 2012
    40
    It seems to me that since "Koyaanisqatsi" in 1982, for which Fricke served as the director of photography, every other film of this sort has been repetition.