User Score
8.1

Universal acclaim- based on 21 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 21
  2. Negative: 0 out of 21

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  1. Aug 26, 2010
    9
    Ingmar Bergman was never one to shy away from the brutal honesties of life, and with "Saraband" (his last feature), all of that pain is projected onto 4 characters who so desperately need fulfillment from each other and themselves. What he leaves us with is this - the longer you wait for resolution in your life, the harder it is to get it.
  2. Oct 8, 2014
    9
    An outstanding final work Bergman made for TV, but it's much too good for it not to have been released theatrically. Basically Scenes from a Marriage: 30 Years Later. Nearing retirement and hearing her ex-husband has done well for himself in advanced age, curious Marianne decides on a whim to see how he's doing, decades later, and stumbles upon Johan's horrible son, who it appears is having an incestuous relationship with his daughter, who's significantly talented with the cello and wants to leave to have some semblance of a normal life but is very afraid to do so. A stunning work, a worthy finale to a remarkable career in the arts for the fine Swedish director, who through but ten dialogues can make a far better film than 90% of the other directors out there today. Expand
Metascore
80

Generally favorable reviews - based on 29 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 25 out of 29
  2. Negative: 0 out of 29
  1. Reviewed by: Richard Corliss
    100
    Saraband makes for a powerful and poignant final roar from the grand old man of cinema--the movies' lion king.
  2. Reviewed by: Phil Hall
    100
    One could literally milk a thesaurus in trying to find the right words to lavish on Saraband: brilliant, towering, majestic, challenging, remarkable.
  3. If ultimately the highly talky Saraband comes across as a minor entry in the canon, it nonetheless marks a dignified farewell for one of cinema's greatest directors.