Septien Image
Metascore
50

Mixed or average reviews - based on 10 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: Michael Tully’s Septien follows Cornelius Rawlings who returns to his family’s farm eighteen years after disappearing without a trace. While his parents are long deceased, Cornelius’s brothers continue to live in isolation on this forgotten piece of land. Ezra is a freak for two things: cleanliness and Jesus. Amos is a self-taught artist who fetishizes sports and Satan. Although back home, Cornelius is still distant. In between challenging strangers to one-on-one games, he huffs and drinks the days away. The family’s high-school sports demons show up one day in the guise of a plumber and a pretty girl. Only a mysterious drifter can redeem their souls on 4th and goal. Triple-threat actor/writer/director Tully creates a backwoods world that’s only a few trees away from our own, complete with characters on the edge of sanity that we can actually relate to. A hero tale gone wrong, Septien is funny when it’s inappropriate to laugh, and realistic when it should be psychotic. The film will make its world premiere at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival and simultaneously on-demand on January 23.(IFC Films) Collapse
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 10
  2. Negative: 1 out of 10
  1. Reviewed by: Alison Willmore
    Jul 7, 2011
    75
    The setup and storyline are absurd, but the angst underneath is as earnest as a campfire confession.
  2. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    Jul 7, 2011
    70
    There's an unkillable something at the heart of Septien, an artistic ambition that's not calculated or cynical, that feels homegrown American but is thoroughly resistant to totalitarian spectacle and the manufactured tides of mass opinion. There's no substitute for that.
  3. Reviewed by: Wesley Morris
    Jul 14, 2011
    63
    A microscopic piece of shoestring weirdness-slash-hipster regionalism that the actor Robert Longstreet delivers into some odder, funkier, altogether mysterious place. I don't know what he's doing or what he's going for. But unlike the rest of the movie, his bizarreness seems authentic rather than forced or put on.
  4. Reviewed by: Chuck Bowen
    Jul 5, 2011
    50
    Like many films early in a director's career, it plays more as a sketchbook of intended future endeavors than as a cohesive and fully realized vision in its own right.
  5. Reviewed by: Justin Lowe
    Jul 5, 2011
    40
    Weakly spoofing, or at least deliberately tweaking, Southern Gothic conventions, writer-director Tully can't fully get his arms around this messy genre mashup.
  6. Reviewed by: Nick Pinkerton
    Jul 5, 2011
    40
    Never the same movie for five minutes straight, Septien can't sit still.
  7. Reviewed by: Jeannette Catsoulis
    Jul 7, 2011
    30
    A lackadaisical dive into backwoods barminess and masculine neuroses, this low-budget paean to indoor plumbing and rampant facial hair doesn't unfold so much as unravel.

See all 10 Critic Reviews