User Score
8.3

Universal acclaim- based on 23 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 23
  2. Negative: 0 out of 23

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  1. Mar 29, 2012
    8
    The cast is what makes Shattered Glass the engaging film that it is. While it does somewhat follow the formula for a by-the-numbers biopic, it's the performances by a surprisingly captivating cast that makes the film so powerful. Special mention must be made of Hayden Christensen, who showed that he was much more than just a Canadian soap star / George Lucas' puppet. Christensen manages to effortlessly display the tension and terror of being "caught" in Glass' lies, and his portrayal of Glass' staunch refusal to ever admit to a lie is only amplified by Peter Sarsgaard's tenacious Chuck Lane, who only wants Glass to just admit to his mistakes. Shattered Glass isn't a perfect film, and may come off as boring to some, but if you enjoy performance pieces from an excellent cast, this film is definitely for you. Expand
  2. Mar 25, 2012
    5
    The film is flashy, but the filmmakers are not getting inside their character's brain at all and rather focus more on the dull procedures of editing in corporate magazines.
Metascore
73

Generally favorable reviews - based on 38 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 33 out of 38
  2. Negative: 0 out of 38
  1. Although the substance could have used more visual style, Ray tells an uncluttered story and draws strong performances from his actors.
  2. Reviewed by: Glenn Kenny
    88
    Against very steep odds, writer-director Billy Ray and company have, in telling the real-life story of fictionalizing "New Republic" writer Stephen Glass and his downfall, produced the most entertaining inside-journalism movie since "All the President's Men."
  3. 75
    The film never digs deep enough into the pressures on Glass from his family, his peers and himself to achieve psychological depth. But as an inside look into the hothouse of journalism, it's dynamite.