Metascore
67

Generally favorable reviews - based on 40 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 27 out of 40
  2. Negative: 5 out of 40
  1. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    Dec 23, 2010
    100
    A fascinating, mature, beautifully crafted work of art, from a director who continues to surprise us. Sofia Coppola has absorbed the Italian avant-garde more completely than her father ever did, and has made a film about celebrity in the vein of Antonioni and Bertolucci, a film about Hollywood in which she turns her back on it, possibly forever.
  2. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Dec 22, 2010
    100
    Coppola is a fascinating director. She sees, and we see exactly what she sees. There is little attempt here to observe a plot. All the attention is on the handful of characters, on Johnny.
  3. Reviewed by: Stephanie Zacharek
    Dec 22, 2010
    100
    Coppola is a filmmaker who fills up a big canvas with small moments: That's the opposite of working in miniature, even though she's attuned to the tiniest details.
  4. Reviewed by: A.O. Scott
    Dec 21, 2010
    100
    The opening shot of Somewhere, Sofia Coppola's exquisite, melancholy and formally audacious fourth feature, prepares you for what is to follow in a characteristically oblique and subtle manner.
  5. Reviewed by: Rene Rodriguez
    Jan 20, 2011
    88
    This is an intentionally fanciful, gossamer movie, extremely personal and heartfelt, influenced in equal parts by Michelangelo Antonioni (although never so elusive) and Gus Van Sant (just not quite so self-conscious).
  6. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Jan 14, 2011
    88
    A distinctly European exercise in observational nuance and tonal restraint in which Coppola stretches static images to the breaking point.
  7. Reviewed by: Owen Gleiberman
    Dec 30, 2010
    83
    The movie's redemptive structure is a bit routine, yet I watched nearly every scene with a sense of discovery. Coppola is a true filmmaker, and in Somewhere she pierces the Hollywood bubble from the inside.
  8. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Jan 6, 2011
    80
    Coppola's audacity in not only portraying the unmoored nature of Marco's life but immersing the audience in it proves satisfying over time.
  9. Reviewed by: Melissa Anderson
    Dec 23, 2010
    80
    Those who groan that the writer-director has made another indulgent film about the obscenely privileged have overlooked Coppola's redoubtable gifts at capturing milieu, languor, and exacting details.
  10. Reviewed by: Ian Freer
    Dec 11, 2010
    80
    It may not have Lost In Translation's reach, but it's original and smartly funny with top performances.
  11. Reviewed by: Justin Chang
    Dec 11, 2010
    80
    The ever-perceptive writer-director further hones her gifts for ruefully funny observation and understated melancholy with this low-key portrait of a burned-out screen actor.
  12. Reviewed by: Ella Taylor
    Dec 22, 2010
    79
    By the end of Somewhere, all I could summon up was a fervent wish-you-well - not for him, but for his beguiling elf of a child.
  13. Reviewed by: Mike Scott
    Feb 25, 2011
    75
    Slowly becomes a thoughtful and interesting deconstruction and demythologizing of American celebrity.
  14. Reviewed by: Steven Rea
    Jan 13, 2011
    75
    Ultimately, Somewhere may be too static, too minimalist a tale. But there's grace here.
  15. 75
    Throughout, Dorff is doggedly credible as an obtuse actor, but the richer performance here is from Fanning, and it might have been a stronger movie told from her character's point of view.
  16. Reviewed by: Ann Hornaday
    Dec 23, 2010
    75
    "Don't tell, show" has been the writer's imperative for generations; Coppola takes that edict to its most visual and satisfying extremes.
  17. Reviewed by: Mick LaSalle
    Dec 22, 2010
    75
    Whatever the intention, Somewhere, in its odd, detached way, is compelling viewing.
  18. Reviewed by: Keith Phipps
    Dec 22, 2010
    75
    It's all so uneasily compelling and quietly moving, it might be too much to ask her to sustain it through the conclusion.
  19. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    Dec 22, 2010
    75
    Some could find the story verging on self-indulgence, and indeed there are patches that teeter perilously close. But we care about the two main characters, and we root for them to reconnect as father and daughter.
  20. Reviewed by: Peter Travers
    Dec 21, 2010
    75
    As in "Lost in Translation," Coppola keeps an eye out for the broken places. That's when Somewhere is really something.
  21. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    Dec 21, 2010
    75
    A small but, in its way, daring picture.
  22. 70
    This is a mood piece, shapeless but often lyric.
  23. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Dec 23, 2010
    70
    It's easy to speculate that the loving Cleo and the frequently absent Johnny are stand-ins for Ms. Coppola and her own famous father, but Somewhere needn't be seen as a film à clef. The movie stands on its own terms as a slow-burning drama of life in a Hollywood purgatory where you can not only check out but leave.
  24. Reviewed by: Kenneth Turan
    Dec 21, 2010
    70
    Slight but often seductive and so deliberately not in a hurry it periodically threatens to dissolve right in front of our eyes, Somewhere is more successful in creating ambience and visual imagery than it is in telling its story of a movie star bonding with his 11-year-old daughter.
  25. Reviewed by: Deborah Young
    Dec 11, 2010
    70
    After her foray into historical costumers with "Marie Antoinette," Sofia Coppola makes a happy return to "Lost in Translation" territory in the cutback charmer Somewhere, which illuminates the emptiness of a movie star's life in Los Angeles through close observation and gentle irony.
  26. 70
    A clearly personal effort, Somewhere demonstrates Coppola's featherweight touch with big subjects like identity and human connection.
  27. Reviewed by: Shawn Levy
    Jan 14, 2011
    67
    The result imparts something of the emptiness of Johnny's existence and, if you're not partial to either the fellow or the technique, might very well drive you up a tree.
  28. Reviewed by: J.R. Jones
    Dec 24, 2010
    60
    Fans of Coppola's movies (and/or perfume ads) will find this free of the absurd pop-rock flourishes in "Antoinette" and more consistent with the skilled tonality and narrative ambiguity of "Translation."
  29. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Dec 22, 2010
    60
    Dorff and Fanning are perfect in their roles, and Coppola captures the draining narcissism of celebrity culture with the understanding of someone who"s witnessed it all her life.
  30. Reviewed by: David Fear
    Dec 14, 2010
    60
    The difference between a movie about emptiness and an empty movie becomes abundantly clear.
  31. Reviewed by: Wesley Morris
    Dec 21, 2010
    50
    I can't say why Coppola wanted to spend time with this man. It's like following someone on Twitter who fails to generate many compelling tweets.
  32. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Dec 30, 2010
    42
    Sometimes empty is just empty. What Gertrude Stein said about Oakland can also apply to Somewhere: "There is no there there."
  33. Reviewed by: Marc Savlov
    Jan 21, 2011
    40
    Oh, the ennui. In Somewhere, it's so thick you could cut it with Stephen Dorff's chiseled cheekbones.
  34. Reviewed by: David Denby
    Dec 13, 2010
    40
    The futility of a noodling movie star is hardly a revelation of the absurdity of the human condition, or whatever this movie is supposed to be about. [20 & 27 Dec. 2010, p. 146]
  35. Reviewed by: Richard Corliss
    Dec 11, 2010
    40
    Somewhere has a lot of good impulses, and a salutary faith in an audience's patience; but the film's tone, in its script, performances and visual style, is studiously uninflected. It's a document of people seen remotely, maybe from outer space.
  36. Reviewed by: Roger Moore
    Jan 19, 2011
    38
    Somewhere is a triumph of tedium, banality passing for depth, a vacuous embrace of nothing.
  37. Reviewed by: James Berardinelli
    Dec 22, 2010
    38
    This movie works best as a sleep tonic. Somewhere isn't just frustratingly slow-moving; it's inert.
  38. Reviewed by: Dana Stevens
    Dec 23, 2010
    30
    Where are we? What is this empty, science-fiction-like space in which luxury goods and women who resemble them are ceaselessly rotated in front of our eyes? Oh, it's Hollywood.
  39. Reviewed by: Kyle Smith
    Dec 22, 2010
    25
    To compete with the quintessence of nullity that is Sofia Coppola's insufferable Somewhere, imagine a film called "Wanna See Me Crack My Knuckles?" or possibly "Let's Learn How Long It Takes This Shallow Dish of Liquid To Evaporate."
  40. Reviewed by: Rex Reed
    Dec 20, 2010
    12
    The latest calcified bore by Sofia Coppola is less pretentious than "Marie Antoinette" but every bit as inertly stupefying as "Lost in Translation."
User Score
6.1

Generally favorable reviews- based on 80 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 14 out of 26
  2. Negative: 9 out of 26
  1. Jan 26, 2013
    8
    This is a mysterious film that begins with a fast car--somewhere--going nowhere. The slow start slice of life emphasizes the real feeling of the fast life--how it looks to others vs. the reality of its ordinariness and lack of connection. Like life, the movie gives the illusion it may be going somewhere and have a climax or a point of great accomplishment, but like a mirror to life it illustrates that the sense of your going somewhere is always an illusion and that, with nowhere really to go, in the end you have the passing of time and the people you care about and then it's the end. The movie holds a mirror to life and shows it as it is and how it feels for everyone. The point is that this is how it is whether you are famous or not. The fast cars, girls, money, fame, don't change the essential nature of life. The sense of needing and wanting to go somewhere, when really there is just here, and after all the running around, you are still just here. Right here. It's film as Zen. In the beginning of this movie, I thought what? And then I realized that this is what film and art should be--transformational in the sense of breaking the illusion that transformation is the goal or that moving forward is the goal. The purpose of life is to take time to feel it even though you know it doesn't go anywhere. It is enough to be somewhere. Full Review »
  2. Feb 4, 2012
    10
    Somewhere is an arthouse film that reminds us of great eras in smaller films, the Italian and French films of the 60s and even quite a few early 90s indie movies. Each shot and scene is put together with exquisite details and nice touches, it makes for a movie that can be seen more than once. Stephen Dorff plays an enigmatic, working cool actor shacked up in LA's Chateau Marmont hotel on the Sunset Strip. He bangs models, wannabe actresses and is a bit of a rocking guy. Emotionally empty and isolated, he finds solace in his 11 year old daughter played by a very talented Elle Fanning. The movie produces a great father and daughter relationship, tragic by design and circumstance, a love story that has nowhere to go. I really thought Dorff was an underrated, naturally cool and talented actor before. And Sofia Coppola creates a collage of memorable imagery, unusual sensitivity and an understated depth to Dorff that really shines. I liked this film more than Lost In Translation. The music is great too. Full Review »
  3. Aug 11, 2011
    7
    It's a good movie, despite a bit slow and, thus, boring. It questions the values of American cinema and even draws a comparison to European films. It's full of irony and some sharp criticism. It's not the most enjoyable film around, but it's quite pertinent and should incite reflection. Full Review »