Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation | Release Date: May 19, 2005
7.6
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Generally favorable reviews based on 1455 Ratings
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4
imthenoobMay 17, 2016
The CGI was sort of a mix for me. I liked the design for some areas but at others, I felt it was too much, Where it was obvious that it was a total green screen shot. The action scenes were very well done as well. My biggest issue is theThe CGI was sort of a mix for me. I liked the design for some areas but at others, I felt it was too much, Where it was obvious that it was a total green screen shot. The action scenes were very well done as well. My biggest issue is the acting. It's so laughably bad, I really do not feel that the cast took this film serious because of how awful the dialogue was written. And that really brings the film down. Expand
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6
marcmyworksDec 27, 2015
I will say, out of the three prequel films this is the strongest. It closes the chapter on a decent note, however the acting and chemistry still isn't there. The choices George Lucas made still aren't strong enough to salvage what could haveI will say, out of the three prequel films this is the strongest. It closes the chapter on a decent note, however the acting and chemistry still isn't there. The choices George Lucas made still aren't strong enough to salvage what could have been a strong set of films. Expand
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6
oxanaSep 12, 2014
The final part of the prequel trilogy, and definitely the hardest to watch as well. There is more violence, and altogether the film is rather dark and filled with despair, cruelty and hopelessness.

Anakin Skywalker takes strides instead of
The final part of the prequel trilogy, and definitely the hardest to watch as well. There is more violence, and altogether the film is rather dark and filled with despair, cruelty and hopelessness.

Anakin Skywalker takes strides instead of steps towards the dark side of the Force. It is almost ridiculous how easily he can be pushed along. There is a lot of scheming going on, a couple of new characters, but the plot is a bit more forward than before. The story is still a bit jumpy, and there is nothing special to the lines delivered. Only few attempts at humor are actually amusing.

Visually a good movie, and the soundtrack has many good spots in it.

Not a bad film, and definitely a good encouragement to start watching the final three parts.
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6
HalfwelshmanOct 10, 2011
Unlike The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones, which both have a damp squib of an opening sequence, Revenge of the Sith glues you to the screen right from the off, with a jaw-dropping scope of a huge battle raging in space above theUnlike The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones, which both have a damp squib of an opening sequence, Revenge of the Sith glues you to the screen right from the off, with a jaw-dropping scope of a huge battle raging in space above the glittering planet Coruscant. There are plenty of other moments that will etch themselves into your brain, from the fan-boy-pleasing (if a little brief) trip to the Wookie homeworld of Kashyyyk, to the beautifully executed, yet heartbreaking "Order 66" sequence, and of course the climactic lightsabre battle between Anakin and Obi-Wan on the volcanic planet Mustafar. George Lucas still can't do dialogue, and forces his poor actors to utter some of the most unintentionally hilarious lines in movie history (I'd have to say Obi-Wan's "younglings" line is the most offensive). The actors do their best with the material they have been given, but there is only so much verbal hamminess one can take. Hayden Christiansen is still awful, and Natalie Portman isn't much better. At least Ewan MacGregor attempts to channel a bit of Alec Guinness into his performance, but still has the tendency to fall back on generic "camp" when the script lets him down. The only actor who really impresses is the always excellent Ian McDiarmid, who takes his portrayal of Emperor Palpatine to Shakespearean villain extremes, and is an absolute joy to watch. The main thing that frustrates me about Revenge of the Sith, and about the Star Wars prequels in general though, is not that they aren't as good as the original trilogy. What really annoys me is the extent to which Lucas involved himself. I understand that Star Wars is his baby, and he'll never quite be able to let it go out into the real world without holding its hand. The thing is, Lucas isn't a great director. He doesn't have the charisma or the technical brilliance to be one. He's an ideas man. He really should have done what he did with Empire and Jedi - jotted down the story and left the front-of-house stuff to a more accomplished filmmaker. While i can still get some sort of enjoyment out of all the Star Wars prequels (even the very-nearly awful Attack of the Clones), I'm left annoyed that they could be so much better if Lucas had taken a step back from his baby and hired a script writer and a director. But when all's said and done, it may not be in the same league as any of the original trilogy, but Revenge of the Sith is the best of the prequels by quite a margin, and provides just what you want from a Star Wars film - fantastic entertainment. Expand
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4
hoops2448Oct 21, 2011
While not as bad as Attack of the Clones, Revenge of the Sith is still dire because of Lucasâ
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5
MovieMasterEddyApr 3, 2016
'Star Wars': Darth Lite.

The defining moment in George Lucas's entire "Star Wars" canon occurs in 1980's "The Empire Strikes Back," when Darth Vader slices off Luke Skywalker's right hand and tells him he's Luke's father. All that Luke has
'Star Wars': Darth Lite.

The defining moment in George Lucas's entire "Star Wars" canon occurs in 1980's "The Empire Strikes Back," when Darth Vader slices off Luke Skywalker's right hand and tells him he's Luke's father. All that Luke has trained for -- to be the chosen Jedi knight who defeats the Dark Lord of the Sith -- comes crashing down around his ears.

As that revelation rings through your mind, you mentally backtrack through everything you've seen up to that point. Could it be true? The sinking feeling is confirmed: True indeed.

That's what all these "Star Wars" prequels -- 1999's "The Phantom Menace," 2002's "Attack of the Clones" and now "Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge of the Sith" -- have been about: how everything got to this powerful, almost atavistic face-off.

Now that "Revenge" officially brings these galactic chronicles to a close -- 28 years after the first "Star Wars" film -- the Darth-Luke climax remains the best scene of them all. And even though "Revenge" is a better experience than "Phantom Menace" or "Attack of the Clones," it doesn't add anything that satisfying or compelling to the big picture. If anything, it takes things away. How could Hayden Christensen, a pouty-lipped twenty-something you'd expect to see handing you a tall decaf latte over the counter, be Darth Vader? And even if he was a good casting choice, how could any scene eclipse what we have already seen? "Revenge" was supposed to be the one that really socked it to us, about Anakin's almost biblical fall from grace. But the movie never rises to its powerful occasion.

In "Revenge," Jedi knights Anakin Skywalker (Christensen) and Obi-Wan Kenobi (Ewan McGregor) have been fighting side by side in the Clone Wars. But their teamwork isn't perfect. Anakin tends to make rash decisions that give Obi-Wan pause.

Obi-Wan's concern proves prescient. Anakin isn't going with the selfless-warrior program. He gets in a gaunt-cheeked tizzy because the inner circle of Jedi knights, including Mace Windu (Samuel L. Jackson) and Yoda, aren't bringing him up through the ranks fast enough.

So he agrees to join forces with the hissable Supreme Chancellor Palpatine (who's really Darth Sidious in not-so-subtle disguise), with the opportunism of a Harvard brat shopping for the best law firm. He listens with ambitious ears when Palpatine (Ian McDiarmid) -- already feuding with the Jedi council over his increasingly tyrannical nature -- invites him to be his personal assistant.

It becomes clear that Anakin must choose between the selfless Jedi code, by which he has been raised, and Palpatine's invitation to dark power. Anakin hides this inner conflict, which affects his relationship with Padme Amidala (Natalie Portman), whom he has married in secret and who is pregnant. He is breaking away from her, and the good side. You know this because he avoids eye contact and conversation with his wife, wears a hood and glares a lot.

In terms of eye-candy action fare, "Revenge" has its battling high points. There's an exciting Obi-Wan clash with the skull-faced General Grievous, a separatist military leader, for instance. And the light saber mano a mano between Obi-Wan and Anakin, as they try not to be swallowed by a volcanic river underneath them, makes a thrilling fight.

But the movie's characters -- as they are written, as they are cast and as they are performed -- detract from the movie's high purpose. As Anakin/Darth, Christensen is simply not compelling. Dark prince of the universe? Those Jedi knights ought to take him over their collective knees and spank him with light saber paddles until he gets over himself.

As Amidala, Portman can't be faulted for a good college try. But she's too often reduced to a sobbing spectacle, as she whimpers and wah-wahs over her husband's moral disintegration. The story only gives her lip-service empowerment, as she struggles to get him back. (Perhaps this is to make sure Christensen doesn't get overshadowed.) McGregor makes a likable Obi-Wan, but with that silly posh accent he's forced to affect, he's a Wan imitator of his predecessor (or narratively speaking, his later self), Sir Alec Guinness. Gravitas was always going to be a tough thing to pull off for these three principals, who are essentially kiddie pawns in Lucas's giant, computer-generated chess game. But if there was a chance to break out, none has grabbed that light saber.

Of course, your humble reviewer does not assume to tell the jillions of devoted "Star Wars" fans they can't enjoy this movie on their own terms. But if they're waiting for the second coming, in his opinion, it happened in 1980. By creating one of the greatest villains of the screen, George Lucas simply couldn't deconstruct Darth Vader's awesome mystique.
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6
MovieManiac83Apr 24, 2015
In perhaps the most blatant instance of a Star Wars character plugging a plot hole, at one point in Return Of The Jedi, Obi-Wan Kenobi brushes aside the lies he told Luke about Vader with this infamous equivocation, "Many of the truths weIn perhaps the most blatant instance of a Star Wars character plugging a plot hole, at one point in Return Of The Jedi, Obi-Wan Kenobi brushes aside the lies he told Luke about Vader with this infamous equivocation, "Many of the truths we cling to depend greatly on our own point of view." So then, from a certain point of view, Revenge Of The Sith, simultaneously the middle and last Star Wars movie, is the best sequel, and the most pleasing surprise, in the entire saga.

In true Saturday morning serial fashion Sith begins with a chapter left-over from a previous adventure: the rescue of the Chancellor from General Grievous by Anakin, Obi-Wan and the saga's best sidekick: R2-D2. Fast, loose, inventive and within touching distance of funny, this is the spiritual sequel to the original escape from the Death Star, reloaded with full Jedi powers. Like a fragment from a lost civilization, this episode hints at countless Clone Wars escapades that sadly exist only in the extended universe — still, at least we have that bit where Jar Jar falls over the explosive marbles captured on film.

The sequence ends with the saga’s single most audacious shot since the Star Destroyer first passed overhead — the front half of Grievous’ flagship The Invisible Hand screeching to a halt yards from camera — and it becomes clear that faced with the thankless task of directly dovetailing into a timeless classic everybody from Lucas down has raised their game considerably. ILM finally seem to have finished the digital toolkit they’ve been toying with since the late nineties fashioning flora and fauna that has real weight and substance for the first time. There are 2,200 effects shots in Sith — more than Menace and Clones combined — and there’s not a single specimen of bad compositing, which is more than can be said for 2006’s SFX Oscar winner King Kong.

Also flawless is Gavin Bouquet’s production design - indeed, Sith's most unambiguous joy is watching Bouquet and Lucas retrofit their galaxy - often there seems to be no escape as the mismatched trilogies crunch together, but a deft aside or throwaway motif always gets us out of the compacter.

So far, so certain point of view - however Sith carries a far graver responsibility than the prequels it quickly outclasses. Lucas himself admitted that fully 60 percent of his original outline was slated for this bridging episode, which means that all the unanswered questions that made the prequels permissible in the first place are addressed here. In other words, Sith is it: this is where the myths get set in stone, Lucas can muck around on Naboo all he likes, but if he screws up the birth of Vader, big black 'ain't ever going to be the same.

And once Sith starts forging myth, fingers are burned. The shortcomings may be familiar by now but they rankle more than ever here. Just as it was becoming possible to tune out the constant clanking of Lucas' lumbering dialogue the words are invested with real import. And just as we were getting used to the declarative ‘30s-style line readings that Lucas alone finds an adequate substitute for acting, the drama is asked to support some really heavy **** Many of the key components of the Star Wars legend — Vader’s birth, Padme’s death — are ultimately undone by dialogue that is ludicrous either in intent or execution.

Sometimes you simply think “Noooo!”

Mercifully then, the Star Wars myth is so powerful, so pre-imagined by so many, that much of it requires no explanation bar our constant narrator: the peerless John Williams. The twin duels that bring the third act to a rousing close confirm Sith as not just the darkest but also the prettiest entry in the saga — the lava landscape of Mustafa, in particular, has obviously been bubbling in Lucas imagination for nearly thirty years. (A few shots also benefit from having best pal Steven Spielberg play around with the “pre-viz” animatic software.)

In the end then, it depends on your point of view. As a sequel to the prequels, Sith is more than anyone can reasonably have hoped for, a movie that made it okay to be a Star Wars fan again.

All sequels must pay for the sins of their fathers: where Return Of The Jedi runs out of plot half way through, Sith has so much ground to make up that Yoda is gamely plugging holes with his last line of scripted dialogue. But even if the last leg of the prequel journey is every bit as bumpy, the view improves considerably and the destination at last proves to be a place many of us still call home.
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6
oDjentoJan 2, 2015
YES. This is the only film of the prequels to get it right: fully right. It's far darker and has many great scenes. Anakin still whines a bit in this film but it's far more bearable in this film. This film starts of excellently and remainsYES. This is the only film of the prequels to get it right: fully right. It's far darker and has many great scenes. Anakin still whines a bit in this film but it's far more bearable in this film. This film starts of excellently and remains great all the way through, showing off Lucas' best visuals of the franchise. Also, this film has the best Jedi fight of the franchise at the end. IT IS AMAZING. It's also pretty brutal for a 12 rated film too, but helps set up for the darkness off the original trilogy. Performances overall are great, other than Hayden Christensens okay performance, but he has improved a lot since episode 2. Great film really. Expand
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6
ReubenIsAGodDec 17, 2015
NOW, this is the best of the prequel films, but that's NOT saying much. This film is dark, very dark, some of the subject matter in the film is downright melancholy and is just haunting. BUT, that in mind, the biggest problem this film has isNOW, this is the best of the prequel films, but that's NOT saying much. This film is dark, very dark, some of the subject matter in the film is downright melancholy and is just haunting. BUT, that in mind, the biggest problem this film has is just the godawful dialog, it is cheesy as all hell *but very quotable* I loved the end fight, it was amazing but again these prequel films suffer from having this issue where the acting can be so unbelievable forced that it is laughable and cheesy. Its AMAZING HOW TERRIBLE THE ACTING CAN BE IN THIS OVER WISE ABOVE AVERAGE FILM. If your gonna watch any of the prequel films just watch this one, its the best. Expand
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6
potatoes351Oct 31, 2012
The best out of the new trilogy but also one of the most boring. Episode III is all about the clone wars, where the Jedi and the Sith come together to start a war. Anakin has got Padme pregnant and his love has been revealed to the order, inThe best out of the new trilogy but also one of the most boring. Episode III is all about the clone wars, where the Jedi and the Sith come together to start a war. Anakin has got Padme pregnant and his love has been revealed to the order, in light of his past actions they are questioning if he is turning to the Sith. The Emperor offers him eternal life and control over the galaxy to finally push him over the edge and turn on the Jedi. Obi-Wan must stop him before the Jedi fall to the ever growing power of the Sith. Great CGI but too much politics made me bored for most of the film. Expand
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6
GreatbealloFeb 8, 2012
This movie was a vast improvement upon the two preceding films, but it is still not quite up to snuff. Anikan is still a problematic character. I don't see Vader in him. Vader is cold and calculating. Anikan is emotional and reckless. TheThis movie was a vast improvement upon the two preceding films, but it is still not quite up to snuff. Anikan is still a problematic character. I don't see Vader in him. Vader is cold and calculating. Anikan is emotional and reckless. The action sequences are a lot of fun to watch, and as the final loose strings of the series are tied off there is some sense of completion and satisfaction. I somehow still felt robbed of what might have been had Lucas just set his ego aside and hired some writers to improve upon his script. The original trilogy will always have a place in my heart, but this second trilogy only has a place on my shelf, where it will gather dust for years to come. Expand
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5
ThatCooperGuyDec 8, 2015
"Revenge of the Sith" turns 10 this year and it was the first Star Wars movie I saw in the theater.

This is the movie everyone wanted to see happen because we finally got to see Darth Vader again, but was sitting through the entire movie
"Revenge of the Sith" turns 10 this year and it was the first Star Wars movie I saw in the theater.

This is the movie everyone wanted to see happen because we finally got to see Darth Vader again, but was sitting through the entire movie really worth it? Vader only had about 3 lines and all of them were terrible. The plot of this movie was leading up to this and while it's not a terrible movie, it's not very thought provoking either. It's filler. Not at the level of "Attack of the Clones" filler, but most of this movie wastes its time on pointless sh*t. I don't care about General Grevious, I don't care about Count Dooku, I don't care about Mace Windu, and I don't even care about Anakin Skywalker and his story is the most important one. Hayden Christansen wins ANOTHER Razzie for his portrayal and came off as an absolutely hilarious idiot.

Lucas just doesn't know what he's doing here. Since this trilogy is so horribly written, I like to think of this "prequel" saga as a completely different species. They don't connect with the original trilogy in any way, unless Lucas has to modify the originals just so they could somewhat be in the same universe. Sigh...

I do have nostalgia for this third film, but how far can nostalgia really take you once your're not interested in what's even happening?

With the few pros: The CGI is certainly the best of the prequels. Even though they lack any heart or substance, they blend in better with their environments. Ewan McGregor gives his best performance as Obi- Wan and has some of the only few lines of dialogue that are very involving and ones that intentionally made me laugh. Seeing Ian McDiarmid reprise his role as the The Emperor in his prime is a pure joy to watch. I love watching the Emperor in this movie, he's so damn evil but he loves to be evil, and he looks so damn creepy and his voice is so goofy but can still be ominous at certain points. Like usual, John Williams' film score is fantastic and is tied with Ian McDiarmid as the two best things about this film.

"Revenge of the Sith" is the most decent Star Wars prequel, but it's just gotten so much more uninteresting with time...
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4
YorkManJul 1, 2016
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. RotS is a definite improvement over the first two prequels (well, it couldn't be as bad as the epically awful AotC), but it is still a monumental disappointment.
The plot revolves around the finale of the Clone Wars, the destruction of the Jedi Order, Anakin Skywalker's reluctant embracing of the Dark Side of The Force, Obi-Wan and Yoda's forced exile, and the 'birth' of Darth Vader, Luke Skywalker and Leia Organa.

The film ties up the relevant plot points adequately but, as a movie, it's just so incredibly lazily directed and ineptly written..... Throw in some (now expected) terrible acting, enough CGI to make you wonder why they bothered hiring any real actors at all, and it all comes together into a well organised mess.

There are some good points.... But not many. Some of the actors in the film (notably Ewan McGregor, as Obi-Wan, and Natalie Portman, as Senator Amidala) are trying to rise above the unbelievably bad script, but are simply unable to. As I mentioned in my review for AotC it's almost as if George Lucas can't imagine any actor in his film(s) being able to express the emotions of their character, so he has to actually have them say what emotional state they're in. And it's so patronising as to be borderline offensive.
Other bad things? Well, Hayden Christensen drags the movie down even more than he did in AotC, mainly because the central crux of the narrative (his 'turning' to the Dark Side) just becomes unintentionally hilarious. He isn't helped by very strange performance by Ian McDiarmid (as Palpatine/Darth Sideous) who turns the evil Sith Lord mastermind into an almost camp parody, with his vocal inflections and over the top mannerisms.
Both Christopher Lee and Sam L. Jackson are both wasted, and the less said about the terrible CGI Yoda the better.

Is there anything good? Not really.... The long awaited reveal of Darth Sideous is quite frankly lame, leading up to the duel between him and Mace Windu which is also very badly put together.
Anakin's turn to the Dark Side is cemented with his revelation 'What have I done?'... A line delivered much better (and with a lot more class and conviction) by the 'original Obi-Wan actor Alec Guinness in Bridge on the River Kwai... And even the destruction of the Jedi, the real emotional set-piece of the movie is terrible... Jesus... Having some cute, chubby kid deliver the line 'Master Skywalker, there are too many of them' before we see Anakin's 'evil' yellow eyes (which makes no sense by the way), and the inference of Anakin killing all the 'Younglings', is just ineptly done....

I could simply go on, but I won't.

The bottom line is that this film is awful but, because it's rounding off several story arcs, it has to include some narrative plot points (and some action scenes) that make it better (if that's a compliment) than the first two prequels....
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6
Bugger217Sep 9, 2017
Revenge of the Sith is the best of the Star Wars prequels, with an exciting opening and truly affecting climax, but that's not to say it doesn't have problems. Many of George Lucas' misguided decisions in regards to stereotypes are gone, butRevenge of the Sith is the best of the Star Wars prequels, with an exciting opening and truly affecting climax, but that's not to say it doesn't have problems. Many of George Lucas' misguided decisions in regards to stereotypes are gone, but they still pop up here and there. The biggest problem is still the stilted direction. There's no sense of urgency in the dialogue. The characters never act like real people. Still, there's a certain atmosphere that sucks you in more than the other prequels do, and Ian McDiarmid deliciously chews the scenery. At the end of the day, it's perfectly watchable, but gets nowhere near the greatness of the originals. Expand
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5
FilmMasterEdJan 5, 2016
Drink the Kool-Aid. Wear blinders. Cover your ears. Because that's the only way you can totally enjoy Revenge of the Sith — the final and most futile attempt from skilled producer, clumsy director and tin-eared writer George Lucas to create aDrink the Kool-Aid. Wear blinders. Cover your ears. Because that's the only way you can totally enjoy Revenge of the Sith — the final and most futile attempt from skilled producer, clumsy director and tin-eared writer George Lucas to create a prequel trilogy to match the myth-making spirit of the original Wars saga he unleashed twenty-eight years ago. Fan boys, of course, have convinced themselves otherwise. So have several critics, if you go by early reviews.

Heralded for its savagery (my God, it's rated PG-13), the film follows Anakin Skywalker (Hayden Christensen — to merely call him wooden is an affront to puppets everywhere) as he loses his limbs and his conscience and takes on the evil mantle of Darth Vader. But thematic darkness is no excuse for dimness in all other departments, except the visual.

In this heretic's opinion, Sith is a stiff, brought down by that special knack Lucas has of turning flesh-and-blood actors into cardboard cutouts. To hear Anakin and his pregnant wife, Senator Padme (the vivacious Natalie Portman rendered vacant), discuss their marriage — a secret that could get Anakin defrocked as a Jedi — is to redefine stilted for a new millennium. The minute any character — human or droid — opens a mouth to speak, your eyes glaze over.

I kept thinking how much better Sith would play as a silent film, with only Chewbacca allowed to do his Wookiee growl and John Williams to trumpet his recycled score.nd yet, Revenge of the Sith is the movie that will do more business (my guess is $400 million-plus), sell more popcorn and brainwash more audiences than any blockbuster this summer. There are reasons: Sith is the last time Lucas will ever skywalk with the Skywalkers on the big screen (talk persists of a TV spinoff). There is enormous goodwill built up by the original series Lucas began in 1977 with Wars: A New Hope, continued in 1980 with The Empire Strikes Back and ended in 1983 with Return of the Jedi. All three of those movies belong in my personal time capsule, despite the Ewok blight on the last one. That's why you, me and everyone we know lined up for 1999's juvenile The Phantom Menace and 2002's atrocious Attack of the Clones. We watched with stifled yawns as Anakin grew from a snot-nosed kid (Jake Lloyd) to a whiny teen lover boy and wanna-be Jedi (Christensen). We justified the thudding lifelessness (a pox on those Jedi councils) by praising Lucas' digital artistry and nurturing the hope that Revenge of the Sith would spin our heads around with the dark magic of Darth Vader.

Not even close. Until the last half-hour, when Lucas actually does establish a emotional connection between the landmark he created in 1977 and the prequel investment portfolio he laid out in 1999, the movie is one spectacularly designed letdown after another. Chief culprit? The script. Even with a reported polish by — say it isn't so — British playwright Tom Stoppard, the words are leaden, faux literate, mock-Shakespearean and devoid of humor. The late critic Pauline Kael once dismissed Wars as "an epic without a dream." I disagree. Lucas' dream is a grand one: to build a mythic futuristic fantasy out of the influences of his youth — the Bible, the Bard, H.G. Wells, Jack London, John Ford westerns, Flash Gordon serials and long afternoons at the movies. If only for the original Wars, Lucas deserves a place in film history. He transformed pop culture into Pop Art.ucas' major error was believing he could do it all alone. With Empire — now officially the best of the Wars six — Lucas had the invaluable help of screenwriters Lawrence Kasdan (Raiders of the Lost Ark) and Leigh Brackett (The Big Sleep), and director Irvin Kershner, who knew how to loosen up actors. For those who wrongly criticized Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher and Harrison Ford back when, all I can say is, look and weep.

As for the good stuff, none of it involves human speech. There's Obi-Wan taking on the droid general, Grievous, whose metal arms can swing four light-sabers. There's the massacre of the Jedi when Palpatine calls for Order 66. There's Palpatine taking on Yoda (again voiced by Frank Oz), whom he contemptuously calls my "little green friend."

ucas almost pulls the plot out of the fire in the film's final section, showing Obi-Wan hacking away at Anakin with his light-saber on the lava planet of Mustafar. Lucas even drops a hint that Anakin thinks Padme and Obi-Wan may have been getting it on. As we watch Anakin nearly melt in the lava, only to be put together, Frankenstein style, in a lab while Lucas intercuts scenes of Padme giving birth to the twins Luke and Leia, a link to genuine feeling is established at last. t's too little and too late. To hail Revenge of the Sith as a satisfying bridge to a classic is not just playing a game of the Emperor's New Clothes, it's an insult to what the original accomplished. To paraphrase Padme: This is how truth dies — to thunderous applause.
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6
OnAnarchyAug 18, 2012
Better than it's predecessor, but not by much. The story works fine, but more work could have been done on the transformation of Anakin into Vader. It felt as though he walked through a door and immediately switched the direction on hisBetter than it's predecessor, but not by much. The story works fine, but more work could have been done on the transformation of Anakin into Vader. It felt as though he walked through a door and immediately switched the direction on his moral compass. Also, what is with the editing in this movie? It's like it was done in powerpoint, what with the blind-cuts and fade-aways. I could easily produce the same effects in a home movie with no effort. Expand
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4
jfrotylpe532Dec 30, 2012
Everyone says this movie got better. Wrong. The acting is still at an all time low, the events unfold in the most messy way possible, and did I mention how terrible the acting was. Anikan had no expression what so freakin ever and still talksEveryone says this movie got better. Wrong. The acting is still at an all time low, the events unfold in the most messy way possible, and did I mention how terrible the acting was. Anikan had no expression what so freakin ever and still talks like a pathetic three year old. Samuel L. Jackson also surprised me with his terrible performance. He basically proved to us of how bored he was when he did this judging by his actions in the movie. Ewan McGregor was just a smart-a**. The best thing about this film was the awesome visualk effects but it's not much better other than that. Expand
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6
ZegilgameshDec 29, 2012
While it is still lacking in the charm, charisma, or characters that made the originals so great, Revenge of the Sith is refreshing, yet brief return to form for the Star Wars franchise.
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4
Longbottom94Apr 27, 2013
All of the positive reviews that I have read keep repeating the same statement, "Its the best of the prequels". This statement may be correct, it still does not count as a positive aspect of the film because, it is almost the definition ofAll of the positive reviews that I have read keep repeating the same statement, "Its the best of the prequels". This statement may be correct, it still does not count as a positive aspect of the film because, it is almost the definition of dampening a film with false praise. Revenge of the Sith has some enjoyable scenes for sure, it also contains; a platitude of monotonous scenes, bad pacing, piss-poor acting, and some of the worst dialogue of the entire prequel trilogy. It can be so disastrous at times its laughable "NOOOOOO!". For the people who liked the previous films you'll like this, however the only positive aspect of the film that comes to mind is the fact that it finally ends the prequel trilogy. Expand
4 of 10 users found this helpful46
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6
Jk9785Feb 24, 2017
The final film of Lucas' Star Wars prequel trilogy is entertaining and fun to watch, but suffers from the same problem as the last two, crappy dialogue and too much CGI.
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4
ballpark_frankNov 25, 2012
As a fan of the first trilogy, I'm still forced to call this episode the 'best' of the second trilogy. Which doesn't help it much. A feeble attempt to 'bring things full circle ("The circle is now complete."???). Even the special effectsAs a fan of the first trilogy, I'm still forced to call this episode the 'best' of the second trilogy. Which doesn't help it much. A feeble attempt to 'bring things full circle ("The circle is now complete."???). Even the special effects seem hokey compared to the original 3 films. The only good thing I can say about this is that it's the last film in this set. Expand
2 of 6 users found this helpful24
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6
FlickFreaks83Dec 11, 2015
Sometimes you simply think “Noooo!”

In true Saturday morning serial fashion Sith begins with a chapter left-over from a previous adventure: the rescue of the Chancellor from General Grievous by Anakin, Obi-Wan and the saga's best sidekick:
Sometimes you simply think “Noooo!”

In true Saturday morning serial fashion Sith begins with a chapter left-over from a previous adventure: the rescue of the Chancellor from General Grievous by Anakin, Obi-Wan and the saga's best sidekick: R2-D2. Fast, loose, inventive and within touching distance of funny, this is the spiritual sequel to the original escape from the Death Star, reloaded with full Jedi powers. Like a fragment from a lost civilization, this episode hints at countless Clone Wars escapades that sadly exist only in the extended universe — still, at least we have that bit where Jar Jar falls over the explosive marbles captured on film.

The sequence ends with the saga’s single most audacious shot since the Star Destroyer first passed overhead — the front half of Grievous’ flagship The Invisible Hand screeching to a halt yards from camera — and it becomes clear that faced with the thankless task of directly dovetailing into a timeless classic everybody from Lucas down has raised their game considerably. ILM finally seem to have finished the digital toolkit they’ve been toying with since the late nineties fashioning flora and fauna that has real weight and substance for the first time. There are 2,200 effects shots in Sith — more than Menace and Clones combined — and there’s not a single specimen of bad compositing, which is more than can be said for 2006’s SFX Oscar winner King Kong.

Also flawless is Gavin Bouquet’s production design - indeed, Sith's most unambiguous joy is watching Bouquet and Lucas retrofit their galaxy - often there seems to be no escape as the mismatched trilogies crunch together, but a deft aside or throwaway motif always gets us out of the compacter.

So far, so certain point of view - however Sith carries a far graver responsibility than the prequels it quickly outclasses. Lucas himself admitted that fully 60 percent of his original outline was slated for this bridging episode, which means that all the unanswered questions that made the prequels permissible in the first place are addressed here. In other words, Sith is it: this is where the myths get set in stone, Lucas can muck around on Naboo all he likes, but if he screws up the birth of Vader, big black 'ain't ever going to be the same.

Most damagingly, Anakin's conversion to the dark side is rushed through during a slack middle act where the chosen one bounces back and forth between Mace Windu and Palpatine like a confused teenager in a soap opera love triangle. The self-inflicted 20-20-60 story split that starved Episodes I and II of real incident, leaves Lucas with far too much ground to make up here: so far we’ve gathered that Anakin is arrogant, horny and has bad dreams —well, we all know it’s just a short-step from there to baby killer.

The delicious McDiarmid does his best to make the dark side sound seductive but unless you are steeped in Force lore (for the record, once Anakin cracks open the door, the flood-gates burst and it is near-impossible to resist) this critical moment - the moment - utterly fails to convince.

In the end then, it depends on your point of view. As a sequel to the prequels, Sith is more than anyone can reasonably have hoped for, a movie that made it okay to be a Star Wars fan again. However, a few fans will always cling to a different truth, to an alternative universe where at least one prequel was the equal of the original trilogy. And for those people, Revenge Of The Sith, the last chance to get it right, will always rate as the biggest disappointment of all.

From a certain point of view.

All sequels must pay for the sins of their fathers: where Return Of The Jedi runs out of plot half way through, Sith has so much ground to make up that Yoda is gamely plugging holes with his last line of scripted dialogue. But even if the last leg of the prequel journey is every bit as bumpy, the view improves considerably and the destination at last proves to be a place many of us still call home.
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6
J42HmusicDec 9, 2011
'Star Wars Episode 3: Revenge of the Sith' is certainly the best film in the prequel trilogy, and this time, George Lucas has created a film with plenty of dark ideas and substance. It is a satisfying end to the prequel trilogy, which'Star Wars Episode 3: Revenge of the Sith' is certainly the best film in the prequel trilogy, and this time, George Lucas has created a film with plenty of dark ideas and substance. It is a satisfying end to the prequel trilogy, which connects adequately with Episode 4. The mutiny within the republic is portrayed brilliantly and despite a boring prolonged light-saber battle at the end, (the music for which is excellent), the film is generally very good. Expand
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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4
christhebeast42Mar 30, 2013
I know that a lot of people love this, and it is the best of the prequels, but the dialogue, acting, and plot is terrible. This is the best prequel, but that's not saying much.
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6
WhiteTalpaJan 1, 2013
The start of the film was awful however it did get better. I hate the prequels but this is easily the best out of all of them. At times i was really gripped by the story and it reminded of what was good about the original trilogy and otherThe start of the film was awful however it did get better. I hate the prequels but this is easily the best out of all of them. At times i was really gripped by the story and it reminded of what was good about the original trilogy and other times i was bored and was losing the will to live. Expand
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4
walkabout_88Dec 28, 2015
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. The fact that it fares better than Episode I and II doesn’t make it any real good. It’s also probably the biggest culprit in the prequel trilogy, because it miserably wastes all the promising premises the story had. Did Anakin had to be so gullible, believing to save Padme just by using the Force, no matter how stupid that sounds? The prequels have been criticized for having too much politics in them, but I think the real problem here is with the trivial, overexposing dialogues surrounding each and every political choice. Was the imposing executive supposed to be a metaphor of the Bush jr. infamous presidency? At least Anakin has the decency of considering impeaching the Chancellor, but Christensen is just so bad at virtually everything he’s trying to deliver, that it’s impossible to find him believable. The ever present massive CGI makes it look like an animated feature most of the time, the action is never engaging, it’s never physical. The final alternate editing too would have been more interesting if it hadn’t had CGI babies in it. It’s such a wonder that a Star Wars movie can be so unemotional and ultimately boring. Expand
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6
ReviewerMan44Jul 1, 2011
Finally, the day has arrived. The final star wars film is upon us. So is it any good? Well...kind of. The film begins with war, it continues with war, and ends with war. That's all there is too it, there really isn't any story to Revenge ofFinally, the day has arrived. The final star wars film is upon us. So is it any good? Well...kind of. The film begins with war, it continues with war, and ends with war. That's all there is too it, there really isn't any story to Revenge of the Sith other than Anakin Skywalker's transformation, and the revenge of the sith (who knew?). The whole movie consists of mindless action, but the action is good. This time it's all about the action and nothing else, whereas Phantom Menace focused on being child accessible, Attack of the Clones tried to focus on story but failed, RotS focuses all its strengths on action, and the action is pretty awesome, but the story, and acting is subpar at best. While it may be the final Star Wars flick, it leaves you with a very sour taste in your mouth, like you wanted more, or wanted less. The ending leaves you thinking the movie easily could have added 20 extra minutes and tied things up nicer. Top all of that off with some very campy and cheesy dialogue and RotS ends up being mediocre but the Star Wars film we had hoped for in the end, while it might not contain the narrative the old films did, the action will marvel your mind, and that's good enough for me. Expand
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6
Sergio2008Jan 3, 2016
Unlike the first two films of this trilogy, Revenge of the Sith is a decent film, but is galaxies away from touching any of the original films. Still, the characters are more authentic, the dialogue is improved, and the last battle betweenUnlike the first two films of this trilogy, Revenge of the Sith is a decent film, but is galaxies away from touching any of the original films. Still, the characters are more authentic, the dialogue is improved, and the last battle between Anakin and Kenobi was a thrill. Expand
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4
colombogermanoNov 23, 2015
Revenge of the Sith fumbles the ball and condemns Anakin Skywalker as a whiner. Is a missed opportunity to portray the inner conflict of Anakin Skywalker. In the end the script and the actor failed to sculpture the shades of gray which canRevenge of the Sith fumbles the ball and condemns Anakin Skywalker as a whiner. Is a missed opportunity to portray the inner conflict of Anakin Skywalker. In the end the script and the actor failed to sculpture the shades of gray which can make a great man/woman fall from grace.

So, after Episode I The Phantom Menace where the story is so loosly told and you are unable to get any attachement to the characters and plot; and Episode II Attack of the Clones, where Anakin is nothing more than a whiner who somehow falls in love with Padme (who curiously waited in age for the little Anakin to grow up) in, perhaps, one of the lousiest romance plots in movies; you get the conclusion of the story of Anakin Skywalker and his transformation to Darth Vader.

In Episode III Revenge of the Sith, Anakin is more annoying than ever. How the Jedi Council could bear with him is a mystery of the Force by itself. And why did he fall to the dark side? Was there philosophical plot that pushed Anakin Skywalker to choose the side of the Chancellor Palpatin? Did the Jedi betrayed their beliefs in a way that Skywalker could not support them anymore? Did he fall because he was on a great quest to save the galaxy but the constant conflict pushed his limits? No, you are told he fell to the dark side because he was an egocentric whiner who did not want Padme to die. The whole plot is weak going around this one and only concern of Anakin. Yes, there is the war against the separatists, there is general Grievous, there is Obi Wan Kenobi, and there is some mention of the political problems in the senate. But all you get is a weak Anakin characterization with a weird relationship with Padme and a final battle with Obi Wan.

After this movie, combining Episode I and II, the mythos of Darth Vader is destroyed. You no longer care for him. When we learned in Episode V that he was Luke’s father, it was a great revelation with still great mystery behind his tragedy to become Darth Vader. Now, after Episode III, it has all come to a missed opportunity. Not for George Lucas who has and will be doing millions of US Dollars… and Disney which bought Lucas Films. The whole of die- hard fans will follow blindly, but I for one, prefer the plot of Knights of the Old Republic better than the prequel which killed Darth Vader and Anakin Skywalker.
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4
flamed_steakFeb 22, 2011
Good god I wish I could enjoy this with all the rapture that the users do here. I can't even watch it anymore so terrible is the dissapointment of what could have been, as opposed to what we recieved. CG is a toy that Lucas was unable toGood god I wish I could enjoy this with all the rapture that the users do here. I can't even watch it anymore so terrible is the dissapointment of what could have been, as opposed to what we recieved. CG is a toy that Lucas was unable to handle and with no-one to reign him in he went at it with so much reckless abandon that all three movies have all the charm of a computer game intro. This however is the most infuriating of the 3, Anakins turn to the darkside was the most hamfisted fall of a charachter that has ever been devoted to film. "What have I done?" is a repentent statement, not one that immediately proceeds a lifelong devotion to evil. The worst of it though is that Anakin still remains a petulant whiny teen that no-one likes, not even the audience, so when Vader appears on screen it's not as a all encompassing bad-ass but as a **** weepy pinhead in a black suit. Noooooooo indeed. Expand
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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