IFC Films | Release Date: May 15, 2009
6.9
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 36 Ratings
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8
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8
lasttimeisawJun 3, 2013
My only previous Assayas’ approach is Maggie Cheung’s Cannes BEST ACTRESS nabbing feature CLEAN (2004, 7/10), and for most Chinese media, Assayas seems to alway been in an ill-fated personage as Maggie’s ex-husband. But his works maturesMy only previous Assayas’ approach is Maggie Cheung’s Cannes BEST ACTRESS nabbing feature CLEAN (2004, 7/10), and for most Chinese media, Assayas seems to alway been in an ill-fated personage as Maggie’s ex-husband. But his works matures splendidly with finesse and sobriety (from CLEAN to SUMMER HOURS), the latter resounds a similar pace of meditation and quietude as Hirokazu Koreeda’s STILL WALKING (2008, 8/10), tackles with a slice of family life, with a contemplation towards the domestic heredity, globalized opportunism, alienated generations and art conservation.

In dealing with a sentimental demise of a bourgeoise matriarch, who resides in a suburban villa near Paris with all her uncle’s art menagerie and his worthwhile sketching books (apparently he was a renowned painter himself and an unspeakable family secret), Assayas infills an indefatigable stamina to keep all the delicate matters in a civil restraint, the contradiction abounds among three siblings in regard to keep or sell the villa; and the proceedings of donating valuable art pieces has also been a bumpy road; for the elder son, he also has teenage children to worry about, and last but not the least, his abiding remembrance of the past is the most poignant blow to one who can fit into his shoes under the circumstances.

The show has never been slid into a thespians’ melodrama notwithstanding the fact that its indulgence of a top-billing Gallic cast, a blonde Binoche incarnates a very light-touch casualness as the metropolitan daughter, living in USA and dedicates herself more in bringing the work of art abroad for the international exposure; Renier, the younger son, finds both an opportunity in settling down in China and an exigent situation in which the profit of selling the villa couldn’t come as timely as possible. While these two are soon-to-be-goners, without a pinch yearning for their homeland, the liability all falls on the elder brother (Berling), whose true-to-life embodiment of his character anchors the film’s backbone in a concrete formality, it is a prickly situation will come about to anyone eventually. Edith Scob, as the deceased mother, whose first 30-minutes appearance contrives to establish herself as an indomitable shadow encroached by the past, when she is gone, something else will be taken with her together and forever, Scob is pitch perfect in her role’s demanding of the physical infirmity, an unswerving mind of knowing her time is up and the duty as a bequeather.

I have not conceal my preference to this quiet, reflective lifelike imitation than other more grandstanding razzle-dazzle, it is a simple film with a concise message delivered eloquently by the mastery of Assayas who auspiciously shoulders on the privilege of an auteur not only in the French terrain, but also as an international landmark, like many of his precedent compatriots.
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All this user's reviews
10
CraigMJun 20, 2009
Wistful, poignant, low-key re-imagining of The Cherry Orchard.
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10
JoeJun 20, 2009
Excellent film, one of the best I have seen this year!
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
ConnNJun 5, 2009
Beautiful, discerning, complex, memorable, penetrating.
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10
ElaineTJun 13, 2009
I loved this film. It subtly and poingnantly examined the issues confronting all of us in a mobile society, at the end of an era.when family estates and property could be passed on to next generations. In a sense there was a Rashoman quality I loved this film. It subtly and poingnantly examined the issues confronting all of us in a mobile society, at the end of an era.when family estates and property could be passed on to next generations. In a sense there was a Rashoman quality as each generation dealt differently with the death of the matriarch and what it would mean to their future lives. The acting was superb, especially that of Eloise, the mother's bonne-a-tout-faire, who was perhaps most affected by her death. This is a thinking person's film and not to be taken lightly. Collapse
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10
JayJun 22, 2009
Excellent performance from the entire cast. Juliette Binoche shines once again. In a summer cluttered with loud big budget blockbusters, this is truly a breath of fresh air!
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10
[Anonymous]Jun 28, 2009
Excellent film! My only minor complaint was I would have liked to see a little more screen time for Juliette Binoche, but this is minor.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
KenKJun 28, 2009
Very engaging with a great aftertaste of having a wonderful glimpse into the lives of three generations. Life moves on for each generation.
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7
robertiJun 11, 2009
Structurally, a 19th century tale, updated for 21st century sensibilities. Essentially sentimental, but capturing the angst of families in the throes of global dispersal, Summer Hours coalesces around an earlier generation's obsessions Structurally, a 19th century tale, updated for 21st century sensibilities. Essentially sentimental, but capturing the angst of families in the throes of global dispersal, Summer Hours coalesces around an earlier generation's obsessions with "stuff"--the material remnants of shared memories. A well-told tale, rings true to life. Expand
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10
EdwardRJun 14, 2009
Ol' man river ain't got nuthin' on Olivier Assayas' gentle portrayal of a family coping with its identity as established in heirloom objects, which in the end must be sacrificed to the effects of globalization and the Ol' man river ain't got nuthin' on Olivier Assayas' gentle portrayal of a family coping with its identity as established in heirloom objects, which in the end must be sacrificed to the effects of globalization and the need for cash, as the generations flow. Expand
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9
DavidJun 18, 2009
I thought this was an excellent film with great performances by the entire cast. I really find it interesting how bitter some of these people giving the film low marks. It's not like the characters were all given everything on a silver I thought this was an excellent film with great performances by the entire cast. I really find it interesting how bitter some of these people giving the film low marks. It's not like the characters were all given everything on a silver platter. If I recall, they all have jobs where they appear to work hard and for the most part appear to enjoy what they do. They actually probably won't inherit that much since the mother didn't do things poperly before she died. I don't have a problem with people making money for working hard. If you have a choice of seeing this film or some of the other garbage currently being shown, choose this for sure! Expand
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