Metascore
64

Generally favorable reviews - based on 34 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 25 out of 34
  2. Negative: 1 out of 34
  1. Directed by Danny Boyle, it lacks even a single moment of charm or interest.
User Score
7.3

Generally favorable reviews- based on 243 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 91 out of 118
  2. Negative: 15 out of 118
  1. Feb 9, 2013
    5
    This review contains spoilers, click full review link to view. Could have been good, if halfway through the movie it would not turn from science fiction to horror/supernatural. Started really good, the scenery was beautiful, the actors were good. The problems started when the "Sun is god" plot was introduced. They board the derelict ship that was sent to the Sun years ago, but failed to accomplish it's mission. It turns out that captain of the other ship is still alive and became some kind of burned monster and servant to Sun. The "creature" start to kill of the ships crew one-by-one, because Sun does not want the crew to restart it's rotation. Yeah this is where thing get rather silly and illogical. The movie from that point is nothing more than a cat and mouse chase movie between the "burned Sun servant" and the crew of the second ship. I did not like that when the "Sun servant" I don't know how to call it) was shown the camera became shaky and blurred. It was rather distracting, like the director did not know how to approach this part of the movie. The ending end everything else from that point is rather predictable. Overall an average horror movie. Full Review »
  2. Sep 25, 2011
    9
    I got what I expected from Sunshine; a profound SF masterpiece that doesn't contain all those unnecessary dialogue and stupid characters. Though Danny Boyle was foolish to put a zombie into the movie, nevertheless its one of the year's best films. Full Review »
  3. May 1, 2013
    10
    Spoiler alert!
    Reading reviews of Sunshine is a profoundly depressing experience, and reminds me that western culture is in its last death
    throes. Every single archetype, symbolism and cultural alliteration swushes as completely and utterly over the heads of reviewers as a Star Trek spaceship, before they proceed to complain about narratives they don`t understand because of illiteracy and an ending they understand even less for the same reason.
    On a first viewing, Sunshine is a visually impressive, if claustrophobic story of a group of scientists on their way to reignite the Sun with the largest nuclear bomb in NATO history. Nothing special there, and if this is all the movie remains for you, more impressive movies can certainly be found. But even on a first viewing it should be obvious that there is another story being told that reaches down into the very foundations of western cultural traditions. You`d think reviewers born and raised in the west might notice this therefore. No such luck!
    To mention all the symbolism, religious and cultural references contained in Sunshine is not easy; indeed I may not even have noticed them all. But from the basic allegory of the Sun as truth/God/creating force present in the Greek, Egyptian, Roman and Christian traditions, many of them are so evident I squirm with embarrassment on behalf of those who fail to notice even any of it.
    The first is the ship in which they travel, named Icarus after the Greek mythological figure who flew too close to the Sun so his wings fell off. As with everything else this is not a literal event being retold, but an allegory regarding the force of truth/God and the futility of trying to become God. If the entire movie is viewed as an allegory of the search for truth, you could easily see that most reviewers would need very powerful sunglasses indeed. If this is correct though, the gatekeeper of truth is the movie`s nemesis, Penbacker, who seeks to destroy the Icarus and prevent the crew from reigniting the Sun, by killing them all. Like a Syrian pillar hermit he has spent seven years close to God (the Sun) and presumes to have understood the futility of denying the death of God (truth), and aggressively seeks to prevent anyone from reigniting the Sun/remaking God/finding truth.
    The actual bomb is triggered from a cross-shaped scaffolding. The cross was traditionally a symbol of the rebirth of God, even before Christianity. Around this cross is a square, representing order. Logically then, as the bomb goes off and God (The Sun) is reborn on the Cross, the main character (Capo) transcends, is reborn as God and a new order begins.
    This is why the ending to the movie is the way it is. Not to be weird but to tell an allegorical story about God/truth/rebirth. To the allegorical illiterates in this weird society this is all nonsense of course, and Sunshine is a bad movie because it`s not simple enough for them.

    I could obviously talk more about all this, and it would be nice if at least one conversation about Sunshine would. Some people detest allegory and wouldn`t recognize a cultural symbol if it jumped up and gave them a haircut, which is perfectly fine. But it might be helpful if the people criticizing this splendid movie understood what an allegory is at least. Personally I firmly believe that certain things can`t be properly communicated without them, as my puny attempts to verbalize them here should illustrate, and I feel that movies with allegorical depth are the only ones that ever become classics. Much the same can be said of literature. And if it`s allegorical depth you want you can`t find a better movie than Sunshine. I defiantly vote 10!
    Full Review »