Super Size Me

User Score
7.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 129 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 15 out of 129

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User Reviews

  1. Dec 15, 2011
    5
    I thought it was decent but it simply proved what we all already knew - That fast food is bad for you. Morgan did a decent job at putting it into film but it simply wasnt that interesting.
  2. Apr 11, 2012
    5
    The lawyers that teamed up with Spurlock look like they've ran out of tobacco companies to sue. This documentary is just using scare tactics to kill fast food companies and pass the blame from the people WHO MAKE THE DECISION to eat the fast food to the corporations themselves because we can't handle being told that we've become too lazy to exercise or eat a proper diet. A poor excuseThe lawyers that teamed up with Spurlock look like they've ran out of tobacco companies to sue. This documentary is just using scare tactics to kill fast food companies and pass the blame from the people WHO MAKE THE DECISION to eat the fast food to the corporations themselves because we can't handle being told that we've become too lazy to exercise or eat a proper diet. A poor excuse for muckraking; this just fuels the "let's sue everyone" fire. However, it was entertaining, so it gets a 5. If you've never seen it, skip it and see Fathead instead. Expand
  3. frankT
    Jan 10, 2006
    5
    Amusing but absurd. Gorging yourself with McDonald's is bad for you? shocking. This filmmaker is a frustrated actor who decided to cast himself in a feature. the idea that you'd take the super size every time it is offered is absurd. that's like accepting every sales pitch you enounter for a month. duh.
  4. MarkB.
    Jun 2, 2004
    5
    George W. ALMOST has as much of a chance of getting "fair and balanced" treatment in Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 as Mickey D. has of getting "a fair shake" (pardon the pun) in Morgan Spurlock's clever, entertaining, often persuasive but also dishonest, deck-stacked hatchet job on The Golden Arches, fast food, and the American way of eating. Spurlock DOES make some very valid George W. ALMOST has as much of a chance of getting "fair and balanced" treatment in Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 as Mickey D. has of getting "a fair shake" (pardon the pun) in Morgan Spurlock's clever, entertaining, often persuasive but also dishonest, deck-stacked hatchet job on The Golden Arches, fast food, and the American way of eating. Spurlock DOES make some very valid and persuasive points, especially concerning the way that junk food is marketed to children in and outside the public school system to "get them hooked" (the drug analogy is heavy-handed but effective and not entirely off the mark), but ultimately he's either too insecure to let his arguments speak for themselves or has too much of an ax to grind against McDonald's to approach the subject with anything resembling...oh, forget objectivity or balance, I'd settle for simple perspective. He photographs Big Macs in as disgusting a manner as possible (while making his girlfriend Alex's vegan treats look like five-star haute cuisine; he turns up the volume so we can hear irritating muching and smacking noises while he gulps them down, all the while TALKING WITH HIS MOUTH FULL...and if all else fails, he pulls the old "there's a hair in my food" bit. (I'm not totally convinced Spurlock didn't implement the non-CGI-enhanced visual we get after his body rejects his first McGoodie with a feather.) While Moore, even after several years and worldwide notoriety, still maintains a genial, avuncular interviweing demeanor that tricks his subjects into shooting one foot off while the other is firmly implanted in mouth, Spurlock comes off as smug, supercilious, and smarter-than-you...the kind of Politically correct figure that gets moderates to vote in Newt Gingrich to avoid proliferating. (I liked Alex a lot, though...she'll never convince me that "ham is heroin", but she's genuinely sweet, clearly loves and cares about Spurlock, and has such an adorable smile that it's obvious that Spurlock's diminished sex drive is the casualty of his incredibly foolish, ill-advised 30-day-McDiet that he most painfully regrets.) In other segments, Spurlock seems to call for the public ostracization and shaming of fat people, and in an interview with an intelligent high school girl discussing her inability to reach supermodel standards seems almost to endorse anorexia and bulimia! Worst of all is this movie's effect on history and legal precedent; let's face it, I enjoy a Big Mac or a Burger King Whopper about 3 times a month, usually don't have a soft drink, and NEVER supersize, but we still live in a free country (which includes allowing its citizens the right to make mistakes or dumb choices), and I resent Spurlock's crowing about how he bullied McDonald's into eliminating their customers' right to do so. Call me old-fashioned, call me short-sighted...but to me the sight of a few bellies flopping over beltlines is a whole lot less threatening or offensive to me than the first stages of Quarter Pounder Prohibition. Expand
  5. Rico
    Sep 29, 2004
    4
    This is a preaching to the choir documentary. Who can disagree that we shouldn't eat junk food except an idiot? Also not enough sly humor or irony to be compared with Michael Moore films. I was entertained but came away with little that was unknown to me.
  6. MarcK.
    May 26, 2004
    6
    Very interesting, and I'm glad I saw it, but the film was too dry for me. He's definitely influenced by Michael Moore, but Spurlock attempts to be more balanced in his presentation, and doesn't ram his political agenda down your throat. Which is a good thing.
Metascore
73

Generally favorable reviews - based on 37 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 32 out of 37
  2. Negative: 1 out of 37
  1. 60
    Beyond any contention is Morgan Spurlock's gift for metabolizing common knowledge into uncommonly entertaining cinema.
  2. Reviewed by: Olly Richards
    80
    It’s a hugely enjoyable descent into epic gluttony.
  3. 90
    Hilarious and often terrifying look at the effects of fast food on the human body.