Thanks for Sharing

User Score
6.7

Generally favorable reviews- based on 35 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 27 out of 35
  2. Negative: 3 out of 35
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  1. Lyn
    Oct 31, 2014
    5
    Some subjects are a natural for a "relatable" movie, but sexual addiction isn't one of them. While "Shame" took a graphic, disturbing approach and "Don Jon" went for laughs, this one aims for a middle ground of angst plus lots of ensemble-cast melodrama that educates us on the travails of this "disease." (As they refer to it; maybe "disorder" would be more accurate?) Mark Ruffalo is neverSome subjects are a natural for a "relatable" movie, but sexual addiction isn't one of them. While "Shame" took a graphic, disturbing approach and "Don Jon" went for laughs, this one aims for a middle ground of angst plus lots of ensemble-cast melodrama that educates us on the travails of this "disease." (As they refer to it; maybe "disorder" would be more accurate?) Mark Ruffalo is never bad, and I also rooted for the hapless dweeby doctor, but Tim Robbins's character is creepy throughout. Pink is great; very natural. I think there are some insights here about the nature of addiction, but you may feel things are resolved a little too neatly. Expand
  2. Sep 23, 2013
    6
    The trailer for this film is one of the most misleading in recent memory. It looks like a smart comedy about sex addiction. Bit the ONLY amusing scenes are in that trailer. The rest of this film is all drama, as it follows 4 addicts (Mark Ruffalo, Tim Robbins, Josh Gad & Pink) in various stages of recovery. They struggle with each other and their personal relationships in predictableThe trailer for this film is one of the most misleading in recent memory. It looks like a smart comedy about sex addiction. Bit the ONLY amusing scenes are in that trailer. The rest of this film is all drama, as it follows 4 addicts (Mark Ruffalo, Tim Robbins, Josh Gad & Pink) in various stages of recovery. They struggle with each other and their personal relationships in predictable patterns. The performances are strong (Pink was a revelation), which makes the rather pedestrian script a bit more bearable. Still, this almost feels like a "recruitment video" examination of the addiction. Expand
  3. Sep 24, 2013
    6
    “Thanks For Sharing” is a film about addiction--sex addiction. When the film opens we meet Adam (Mark Ruffalo) who has 5 years of recovery, his sponsor Mike (Tim Robbins) and Neil (Josh Gad) who is court ordered to attend the sessions but doesn’t take it seriously until he loses his job as an ER medic. Neil has problems with his mother Roberta (Carol Kane), while Mike’s son, Danny,“Thanks For Sharing” is a film about addiction--sex addiction. When the film opens we meet Adam (Mark Ruffalo) who has 5 years of recovery, his sponsor Mike (Tim Robbins) and Neil (Josh Gad) who is court ordered to attend the sessions but doesn’t take it seriously until he loses his job as an ER medic. Neil has problems with his mother Roberta (Carol Kane), while Mike’s son, Danny, (Patrick Fugit) was a drug addict who was treated badly by his father when he was young and Mike’s wife, Monica (Joely Richardson) has learned how to deal with her husband’s problems by concentrating on herself.

    The film revolves around three couples from the long married Mike and Monica to Adam ready to have his long purposely delayed sexual experience after meeting Phoebe (Gwyneth Paltrow) and the friendship between Neil and Dede (Alecia Moore aka Pink), the latter wilder than any of the men.

    As in any film about addiction there are victories and defeats though in “Thanks For Sharing” there are more of the former. The scenes involving Tim Robbins, Joely Richardson and Patrick Fugit, especially those between the two men, are full of electric. Josh Gad and Alecia Moore offer the comedy relief with both doing excellent work. The first scene of Ruffalo with his shirt off brings back the 50s and 60s when actors like William Holden has to shave their chests of all hair--obviously that rule doesn’t apply anymore.

    Ruffalo gives a warm, sensitive performance while Paltrow, as a cancer survivor, comes across as cold and unfeeling with the role begging for a warm, girl next door actress. By the way the film Academy may have to give an Oscar for the actress who gives the best lap dance and strip show if there are any more in addition to Paltrow here and Jennifer Aniston in “We’re The Millers”--right now Aniston wins!

    With a screenplay by Stuart Blumberg, who also directed, and Matt Winston, “Thanks For Sharing” really doesn’t bring anything new to an addiction story except here it is about sex instead of drugs and/or alcohol so there are more sexual situations shown. Mark Ruffalo, Tim Robbins, Josh Gad, Patrick Fugit and Alecia Moore all do excellent work and hold your interest as does the photography of New York City by Yaron Orbach.
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  4. Nov 11, 2013
    6
    In one of the many meetings showcased in the film Thanks For Sharing, one recovering addict describes their sex addiction as “trying to quit crack, while the pipe is still attached to your body”. Though I have never personally experienced, nor have I had the experience of meeting an openly admitted sex addict, I’m sure many young people today wouldn’t see it as a ‘disease’ as described inIn one of the many meetings showcased in the film Thanks For Sharing, one recovering addict describes their sex addiction as “trying to quit crack, while the pipe is still attached to your body”. Though I have never personally experienced, nor have I had the experience of meeting an openly admitted sex addict, I’m sure many young people today wouldn’t see it as a ‘disease’ as described in the movie, but perhaps more of a blessing.

    The last time the subject of sex addiction and the portrait of a nymphomaniac was explored was Brandon in Steve McQueen’s intolerably alluring Shame. There is no doubt that Shame is the better of the two films, exploring a darker, grittier and more unabridged account of a sex-feinding businessman.

    Thanks For Sharing, shortly following its fade to black, will spark conversations about what the film did well and why. The film is a very interesting and real take on a subject that I, along with many people I’m sure, have little or no knowledge about.

    The film follows three generations of sex addicts; Mike (Tim Robbins) a husband, father and recovering alcoholic who acts as the sole patriarch of the strenuous twelve step program; Adam (Mark Ruffalo) a handsome businessman who is just celebrating his five year sobriety milestone; and Neil (Josh Gad), a doctor who has recently started attending the meetings, using it as a platform for free bagels with no real intent to recognize his addiction. As the progress (or lack there of) of each recovering addict takes a balanced and healthy routine, Mike, Adam and Neil all experience a major shift in their habits when a new person decides to enter each one of their lives.

    The best part of Thanks For Sharing are these new additions that create a large wave of ripples in each of the sex addict’s lives and allow for the most potential of the narrative and character study’s to shine. For Mike, his world is turned upside down when his estranged, drug-addict son Danny (Patrick Fugit) returns home after fleeing the home years previous with his mother’s jewelry (Joely Richardson) to score some crack. From the moment Danny walks through the door, we question his sobriety and whether or not he was really able to rehabilitate himself, without the help of meetings and others, a technique his father swears by. For Adam, the new entry in his life is Phoebe (Gwyneth Paltrow), a sexy, racy health freak with issues of self-confidence and a past of her own. Phoebe reintroduces Adam to a lusty, freaky world of pleasure that he is hesitant to embrace. For Neil, whose amateur sex issues present the biggest problems of the film since they are so new, meets Dede (Alecia Moore or most famously known as pop-sensation P!nk) a sex-crazed, ticking time bomb who’s thoughtless decisions and dark sexual past gives purpose and hope for Neil, the ultimate sexual daydreaming wanderer.

    There are some dark moments in Thanks For Sharing, as well as an abundance of feel-good, genuinely hysterical dialogues between characters, touched with instances of heavy drama. The film itself is a tonal misfire with some of the worst music composition and manipulative soundtrack decisions that takes you completely out of the amped up cinematic drama.

    Initially released at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2012, it’s quite apparent why the film has failed to find an audience. Regardless of its talented cast line-up, Thanks For Sharing is like unsatisfying foreplay; arousing and promising, although by the end, leaves you soft and hungry for more. The R-rating, along with the mis-marketed/non-glamourized look at the sticky subject through the trailer, and the grim direction that the film almost unexpectedly veers at times, really confuses moviegoers whose reaction can be described as nothing less than cinematic blue balls.

    The film does delve into familiar territory; Strong family-drama, unconventional love story, and unformulaic buddy/comedy, Thanks For Sharing seems to share its worth of knowledge of genres. Unfortunately, the interesting questions and scenarios that the film presents get lost in the quest for a real identity. The film will present some interesting questions once audiences leave the theatre, but for the most part, the underlining question that will overshadow all other questions will be whether or not you like the film itself.
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Metascore
54

Mixed or average reviews - based on 38 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 14 out of 38
  2. Negative: 3 out of 38
  1. Reviewed by: Liam Lacey
    Oct 17, 2013
    50
    Thanks for Sharing might best be described as being like Steve McQueen’s sex-addiction drama, "Shame," if it were rewritten by Neil Simon at his most schmaltzy.
  2. Reviewed by: Kate Stables
    Oct 5, 2013
    60
    Despite Gwynnie and her lingerie-clad lap-dancing, this sober, issue-based dramedy is preachy and a tad soapy, rather than provocative. Fine acting, though.
  3. Reviewed by: Robbie Collin
    Oct 4, 2013
    60
    Tonally the film is all over the rink, but it leaves you more convinced and entertained than you’d expect.