Bully

Metascore
74

Generally favorable reviews - based on 33 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 33
  2. Negative: 0 out of 33

Where To Watch

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Critic Reviews

  1. Reviewed by: Nick Schager
    Mar 29, 2012
    60
    Graceful cinematography captures the loneliness and isolation of these kids with understatement, even when the director succumbs to twinkling piano that pulls a tad too hard on the heartstrings.
  2. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Mar 31, 2012
    60
    Incredibly enough, it seems many people still believe that bullying is just a matter of "kids being kids." Until that attitude changes, this film should be considered required viewing for every parent, teacher and teenager in America.
  3. Reviewed by: Kalvin Henely
    Mar 27, 2012
    50
    Leaves us moved by poignant scenes of victims' shattered lives, but, for reasons unclear, keeps the bullies themselves largely out of our reach.
  4. Reviewed by: David Fear
    Mar 27, 2012
    60
    This antibullying advocacy group could not be more well-intentioned or needed, but suddenly, the sneaking suspicion that you've merely been watching an extended PSA for the grassroots organization starts to take hold.

Awards & Rankings

User Score
7.3

Generally favorable reviews- based on 47 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 15
  2. Negative: 1 out of 15
  1. Mar 30, 2012
    7
    Hard hitting, thought provoking, heart-rending and timely, "Bully" is a documentary that approaches an all too familiarly overlooked subjectHard hitting, thought provoking, heart-rending and timely, "Bully" is a documentary that approaches an all too familiarly overlooked subject in a way that hasn't yet been explored; its graceful, and sure to pull on the heartstrings. However, unlike its unimpeachable intent and central message, "Bully," the film, undermines the totality of the subject by avoiding to satisfy it on an intellectual level; not a single interview with the titular contributors (bullies) or even a mere statistic solidifying the real-life gravity of the issue. For everytime a tear is shed, another opportunity is flubbed away from making it truly great and equally, memorable. As it is, "Bully," is a "cause for change" docupic that does offer moments of arising deep-seated pathos and stirring those around those emotions, but the erratic editing and the degree of simplicity derived from the omission of key tangibles, keeps back what could have been a game-changing medium for ages to come. Still among the best documentaries of 2012. Full Review »
  2. Mar 30, 2012
    10
    Awesome documentary really. The development of the documental y really exactly. Bully is a demand for this actual problem that much kids live,Awesome documentary really. The development of the documental y really exactly. Bully is a demand for this actual problem that much kids live, and be a good pack. Full Review »
  3. Jun 9, 2013
    5
    You know, I don't need this to tell me what I think everybody already knows: Bullying is bad. This is all just a collaboration of tear jerkingYou know, I don't need this to tell me what I think everybody already knows: Bullying is bad. This is all just a collaboration of tear jerking families; please note that I do feel bad for the families who's children are being put in these horrible situations and in no way am I ignoring the seriousness of the topic, but that's all this is. It just shows these families who's kids are being bullied, and that's it. The major problem with this is that it doesn't offer any solution, and personally I think because there is no solution. Bullying is evil; to an extent, and we all know that with good there's always going to be bad. It's how the world works and we may wish for a world of purity and innocence, but then it wouldn't be called living. Unfortunately though some people have bigger misfortunes than others, we feel sympathy for them for their loss, but it seems almost wrong to release their stories as a theatrical film. That's another thing that bothered me, if the director wanted to spread the word of this, why didn't he/she just put it on a website or something? The film wasn't a great success at the box office, so is it because people don't care or because they don't want to see a cruel and just downright depressing feature. I personally think that one could get the message across better if they made it not as depressing, but at least offered some positive atmosphere as well. Full Review »