Metascore
63

Generally favorable reviews - based on 31 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 31
  2. Negative: 1 out of 31
Watch On
  1. Reviewed by: Tim Robey
    Aug 25, 2014
    60
    [Folman's] film is an alluring curio, a protest against the digital frontier which gets stuck with a knotty internal paradox – it starts out as thoroughly its own experiment, and ends up like a counterfeit of too many others.
  2. Reviewed by: Tom Huddleston
    Aug 13, 2014
    60
    Folman’s vision is just too personal and obtuse, and the result can feel rather like watching someone else drop acid, enjoying their giddy descriptions of all the pretty colours but unable to fully engage.
  3. Reviewed by: Dan Jolin
    Aug 11, 2014
    60
    A fascinating and visually impressive intellectual helter-skelter ride, but the lack of narrative coherence lets down its promising sci-fi concepts and satire.
  4. Reviewed by: Noel Murray
    Jul 14, 2014
    60
    Too much of Ari Folman’s half-animated science-fiction feature The Congress feels just a bit off—but every now and then, the concept, the performances, and Folman’s visual flair combine to produce something extraordinary.
  5. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    May 22, 2013
    60
    Ambition markedly outstrips achievement in The Congress, a visionary piece of speculative fiction that drops the ball after a fine set-up.
  6. Reviewed by: Xan Brooks
    May 22, 2013
    60
    The Congress contains tricks aplenty and ideas in abundance. The problem comes in herding these scattered, floating elements towards a satisfying whole.
  7. Reviewed by: Richard Roeper
    Sep 5, 2014
    50
    It’s fascinating and boring, intriguing and exasperating, but ultimately it felt like a jambalaya of ideas that didn’t quite mesh into a satisfying experience.
  8. Reviewed by: Chris Nashawaty
    Aug 28, 2014
    50
    Ari Folman's meta-commentary on Hollywood in the soulless digital age starts off promisingly, like a Charlie Kaufman mind scrambler. But then it spirals into logy animated nonsense.
  9. Reviewed by: Mike D'Angelo
    Aug 27, 2014
    50
    It’s a folly of the first order, but one that many people will nonetheless want to see, if only because it’s so out there.
  10. Reviewed by: Kimberley Jones
    Aug 27, 2014
    50
    Wright is terrific – sensitive and alert – in the live-action opening. But that opening runs more than 45 minutes long, a way too heavy-handed preamble to the crazed animation to come, and the actress’ vocal delivery – soft-spoken, gently bewildered – is too soporific to pull off lines like, “Look at me, I’m your prophet of doom.”
  11. Reviewed by: Chuck Bowen
    Aug 24, 2014
    50
    The film lacks the manic fly-by-night invention of, say, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, or even the ripe erotic ambiguity of something like Avatar.
  12. Reviewed by: Mike Scott
    Sep 5, 2014
    40
    On the one hand, there's a thrill in such experimentalism. On the other, it doesn't always deliver a fully satisfying moviegoing experience.
  13. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Sep 4, 2014
    40
    It’s almost painful to watch the immense promise of The Congress, Ari Folman’s spectacularly ambitious experiment, dissipate into nothing.
  14. Reviewed by: Peter Debruge
    May 22, 2013
    40
    Apart from its general knock against ageism in Hollywood, The Congress doesn’t have much insight to offer on the subject.
User Score
7.1

Generally favorable reviews- based on 29 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 5
  2. Negative: 0 out of 5
  1. Feb 22, 2015
    7
    the congress is very well made movie. it has a compelling story about identity and escaping reality, very good performances (especially fromthe congress is very well made movie. it has a compelling story about identity and escaping reality, very good performances (especially from Robin Wright) and some amazing animation. it's major flaw is it's length and it's pacing, the film has a lot of padding and at times feels like it's 2 movies forced together and as a result the themes and messages feel confused. but at it's heart this is an impressive film it just should have been shorter and i believe it will appeal to a lot of people particularly art house fans Full Review »
  2. Oct 17, 2014
    6
    Israeli director Ari Folman’s fourth film, THE CONGRESS is the much anticipated follow-up after his Oscar-nominated animation-documentaryIsraeli director Ari Folman’s fourth film, THE CONGRESS is the much anticipated follow-up after his Oscar-nominated animation-documentary WALTZ WITH BASHIR (2008), which to my ruefulness I have yet to watch, since I am eternally lagging in the field of documentaries, let alone a war documentary.

    THE CONGRESS has an intrinsically distinctive allure of its own because it is a film creatively amalgamate live-action with animation, and inspired by Stanislaw Lem’s Sci-Fi novel THE FUTUROLOGICAL CONGRESS, it ambitiously challenges to handle a thornier theme of human race’s incorrigible addiction to chemicals which ultimately erase all one egos than it appears to suggest, a showbiz industry agism satire and the advance of technology which foreshadows the doom of the line of actor (which both FINALE FANTSY: THE SPIRITS WITHIN 2001, and the film itself can justify at least for now, animation cannot replace real actors, live-capture may be a more probable contrivance).

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    Full Review »
  3. Oct 6, 2014
    10
    Imagine a world where experience could be inhaled like a pharmaceutical. There would be no need for movies, because the direct experience ofImagine a world where experience could be inhaled like a pharmaceutical. There would be no need for movies, because the direct experience of another life is always available - we wouldn't have to see it, we would be it. In this reality, personal identity would cease to be something stable and defined; your identity could shift from moment to moment as you live unlimited possible experiences. The real world already has trouble competing with fantasy, but with this pharmaceutical, fantasy would become the reality, and how many people would truly accept their normal life if an unlimited number of experiences and adventures was always instantly available? This is the question the movie asks, and the future it terrifyingly predicts. "I am your prophet of doom" says the Robin Wright character, as she describes this future. In this way, it shares similar conceits with The Matrix, another movie built on the fact that reality is entirely a creation of the mind. But unlike The Matrix, The Congress posits that most people would happily embrace a fantastic false reality over our default one. Full Review »