Metascore
86

Universal acclaim - based on 39 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 36 out of 39
  2. Negative: 0 out of 39
  1. A ferociously entertaining film.
  2. 100
    A new American crime classic from the legendary Martin Scorsese, whose talent shines here on its highest beams.
  3. 100
    It is intriguing to wonder what Scorsese saw in the Hong Kong movie that inspired him to make the second remake of his career (after "Cape Fear"). I think he instantly recognized that this story, at a buried level, brought two sides of his art and psyche into equal focus.
  4. 100
    This is the most vibrant, exciting and invigorating movie-movie of the year.
  5. A movie-movie of the first rank.
  6. 100
    The original film was gritty and entertaining ("Infernal Affairs"); the new version is a masterpiece - the best effort Scorsese has brought to the screen since "Goodfellas."
  7. Reviewed by: Glenn Kenny
    100
    A triumphant revisiting of territory in which Scorsese is an unchallenged master -- the crime drama.
  8. 100
    A thrilling return to form.
  9. 100
    Thelma Schoonmaker, a Scorsese collaborator for over a quarter-century, did the bull's-eye editing. The moviemaking throughout is swift, unaffected, masterly.
  10. 100
    DiCaprio harnesses a terrific, buggy intensity reminiscent of "GoodFellas'" hopped-up Henry Hill (Ray Liotta).
  11. Reviewed by: David Ansen
    100
    The Departed is Scorsese's most purely enjoyable movie in years. But it's not for the faint of heart. It's rude, bleak, violent and defiantly un-PC. But if you doubt that it's also OK to laugh throughout this rat's nest of paranoia, deceit and bloodshed, keep your eyes on the final frames. Scorsese's parting shot is an uncharacteristic, but well-earned, wink.
  12. The screenplay, by William Monahan, is simply sensational. Scenes play brilliantly. Feelings flow like molten lava. The dialogue overflows with edgy wit and acidulous arias of imprecation.
  13. 100
    When a director of Scorsese's caliber is working at the top of his game, it's a reminder of why we go to the movies in the first place.
  14. The very title The Departed suggests a James Joycean take on Irish-Catholic sentiment when, of course, this story is anything but: It's Scorsesean, and he's in full bloom.
  15. DiCaprio's performance is a revelation only for those who have underestimated him. In Scorsese's previous films, "The Gangs of New York" and "The Aviator," he seemed callow and miscast, but here he has the presence of a full-bodied adult. He's grown into his emotions.
  16. 91
    It isn't in the same league as the director's best work, chiefly because it lacks the bravura flourishes of cinematic craft that helped make his name. But it's so vital and bloody and funny and wicked and tense and unapologetic that it feels kin to those films, which little of the director's work of the past decade has managed to pull off.
  17. Whatever it is, the film is the first major release of the fall worth talking about: a fast-paced, visually slick, psychologically fascinating Boston-set cops-and-crooks saga.
  18. 90
    Scorsese didn't need to remake "Infernal Affairs," but what he has done with it is a compliment rather than an affront to the original: The Departed reimagines its source material rather than just leeching off it, preserving the bone structure of the first movie while finding new curves in it. The story has been clarified; the ellipses of the original have been filled in with just the right amount of exploratory shading. This is a picture of grand gestures and subtle intricacies, a movie that, even at more than two hours long, feels miraculously lean. It's a smart shot of lucid storytelling.
  19. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    90
    This reworking of a popular Hong Kong picture pulses with energy, tangy dialogue and crackling performances from a fine cast.
  20. 89
    This is a dream cast for both Scorsese and the viewer, and everyone is working at the peak of their craft. Nicholson's flawless performance as the increasingly unhinged crime boss is a marvel of manic, paranoid ruination.
  21. 88
    The profanity-laced but witty and literate dialogue by William Monahan ("Kingdom of Heaven") is delivered by a brilliantly chosen cast, almost all of whom are operating at the very top of their game.
  22. It's a movie with a pulse. Sometimes, it flies off the chart.
  23. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    88
    The film's score and editing brilliantly heighten the film's energy, keeping the audience somewhat off-kilter and unsure where things are headed.
  24. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    88
    When The Departed roars to life, as it does in so many of its scenes, you feel like nobody understands movies -- the delirious highs, the unforgiving moral depths -- as well as this man does. Welcome back, Marty.
User Score
8.2

Universal acclaim- based on 976 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 49 out of 390
  1. Mar 19, 2012
    10
    The film is not a film like taxi driver or Raging bull but, it is instead a regular crime thriller film with scorcesse's special touch. This film would have been just an average film if it werent for 2 things. Scorcesse's direction and the acting ensemble. The films writting is also masterful but, it works extremely well because of the acting. Overall a great film. Full Review »
  2. May 21, 2013
    9
    An excellent film with an outstanding cast brilliant direction and genius writing and a spectacular ending. This is one of the finest films of Scorsese since Goodfellas & Taxi Driver. Full Review »
  3. Sep 22, 2011
    6
    This review contains spoilers, click full review link to view. Martin Scorsese's translation of "Internal Affairs" offers nothing new or shocking except for a surprisingly well performed Wahlberg. He ends the movie with his own american twist (everybody dies) and boom, before you know it the movie is barely done. Overall its good, but he barely makes his point in "The Departed" with his overaggressive 'American' translation of the stunning original. I recommend Martin Scorsese to try better, like the time where he had the spirit to direct "Taxi Driver". Full Review »