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43

Mixed or average reviews - based on 34 Critics What's this?

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5.5

Mixed or average reviews- based on 131 Ratings

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  • Starring: ,
  • Summary: What if you were told that every moment you experienced and every memory you held dear never happened? In this psychological thriller, Telly Paretta (Moore) is tormented by the memory of her eight-year-old son's death in a plane crash 14 months ago. While trying to work through her grief,What if you were told that every moment you experienced and every memory you held dear never happened? In this psychological thriller, Telly Paretta (Moore) is tormented by the memory of her eight-year-old son's death in a plane crash 14 months ago. While trying to work through her grief, she is informed by her psychiatrist (Sinise) that she is suffering from delusions, that her son never existed and she is fabricating his memories. (Revolution Studios) Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 34
  2. Negative: 8 out of 34
  1. It struck me as the most exciting and original Hollywood thriller, occult or otherwise, since "The Sixth Sense."
  2. Reviewed by: Sid Smith
    63
    The stylish and imaginative imagery in director Joseph Ruben's film, not to mention the parapsychological twists and mysteries, evoke the work of director M. Night Shyamalan.
  3. Ultimately only Moore, with her eyes always half-damp and voice half-cracked and body language half-mad, keeps the movie on the ground, when it too often threatens to fly into the thin air, where the audience would laugh it off the screen.
  4. Sustains a few icy chills, but a mix of genres muddles the story.
  5. Reviewed by: David Ansen
    40
    It's poppycock, but well directed: Ruben delivers two or three guaranteed jolts, which almost make up for the copout of an ending.
  6. Reviewed by: Pete Vonder Haar
    40
    There isn't much here any semi-regular viewer of "The X-Files" hasn't already seen a dozen times before.
  7. It's "The Sixth Sense" as nonsense, "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" without the sunshine. Or the mind.

See all 34 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 68
  2. Negative: 33 out of 68
  1. TinaA.
    Jun 1, 2006
    10
    Are you people insane? This movie was amazing, and one of the best thrillers ever! Ms. Moore was spectacular!
  2. MarkB.
    Nov 13, 2004
    7
    There just isn't enough space, here or elsewhere, to adequately praise Julianne Moore. In films like Safe, Far from Heaven and The There just isn't enough space, here or elsewhere, to adequately praise Julianne Moore. In films like Safe, Far from Heaven and The Hours, she corners the market on portrayals of suburban wives and mothers whose outward security and placidity eventually gives way to hidden fears and desires that polite society doesn't allow to be discussed much less dealt with. (It's interesting that the offscreen Moore seems to have such a happy, totally uncomplicated family life.) Though I'm sure its makers weren't ambitious enough to intend it to be, The Forgotten, a modest, trendily conspiracy-minded thriller, is an interesting addition to the above list of delineations of Moore's most recognizable screen character. She plays a mom whose beloved son almost literally disappears into thin air before the movie begins; other similarly afflicted parents she meets have not only taken their tragic losses in stride, but seem to have completely forgotten that their children ever even existed. Moore not only won't forget, but her behavior--which most of us would consider for the most part absolutely normal and understandable for a grieving parent who has been denied closure--is viewed by the others (and by society) as completely inappropriate and bizarre. There are definitely all sort of potentially provocative subtexts here, but writer Gerard DiPego (Phenomenon) and director Joseph Ruben don't take the opportunities. Although this movie could be described as "The 2004 M. Night Shyamalan Movie That M. Night DIDN'T Make", Ruben is no auteur like the brains behind The Village. A competent, workmanlike thriller director who, along with Jonathan Demme, John Waters, Joe Camp, Michael Schultz and Bob Clark (what a motley crew THAT is!) is one of the very few 2004 directors to have been working since the 1970s, Ruben is primarily interested in goosing you from behind and yelling "BOO!" And that he does very effectively; an out-of-nowhere shock that Steven Spielberg delivered so effectively in Jaws, but did once and only once, is repeated several times here. (Judging from the reaction of the audience I saw this with, I've no doubt that the theater ushers who clean up the spilled popcorn and drinks between showings really earned their pay with this one.) Maybe this is why (some Metacritic voters to the contrary) The Forgotten, despite its seemingly out-of-nowhere ending that really isn't, hasn't aroused the extreme anger among some moviegoers that Shyamalan's far more ambitious, accomplished and elegant The Village has. Through it all, Moore delivers yet another perfectly tuned characterization that beautifully portrays all the necessary emotional peaks and valleys of her character's journey without ever seeming false, over the top or straining for effect. All in all, with Moore, The Forgotten is more than the sum of its parts; without Moore, it would be far, far less. Expand
  3. JackL.
    Nov 18, 2005
    6
    An average movie with alot of potentiel, had the ending been thought out with a bit more realism. Worth a rent if your into these kind of An average movie with alot of potentiel, had the ending been thought out with a bit more realism. Worth a rent if your into these kind of thriller's (like the sixth sense, etc.). Expand
  4. Jun 10, 2012
    4
    The Forgotten begins with an intriguing premise: however, as the story develops, the audience realizes that the film may not be soThe Forgotten begins with an intriguing premise: however, as the story develops, the audience realizes that the film may not be so psychological as it is supernatural. The film had lots of potential, but it didn't follow through. Expand
  5. Dec 17, 2012
    4
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. "The Forgotten" is, in short, a movie quite worth forgetting. The initial premise is intriguing - Julianne Moore plays a mother who lost her son in a plane crash, only to realize that the child was supposedly stillborn and she has invented 9 years of memories with him. Unfortunately, it doesn't take long at all before the film goes from interesting to bland and silly. At 91 minutes, the movie is astonishingly short for what it's trying to do, resulting in consistent overpacing - it feels you've only been watching 10 minutes before Moore's confronting the idea that her son never existed, and about 5 minutes later she's joined up with a father in a similar predicament and on the run from NSA agents. And just when this movie seems to strike the most basic level of boring, our characters come to the realization that their kids are still alive, and have really been . . . (sigh) . . . abducted by aliens. Really? Aliens? We went from an engaging psychological thriller to aliens? And of all the scientific research priorities such aliens would have upon discovering our species, the one they choose is kidnapping children to see if they can dissolve the parent-child bond? Is this a drama or a comedy? The main alien villain (who shows up about 5 minutes in and is a patently obvious "secret" antagonist right off) is probably the blandest and most nonchalant extraterrestrial ever put to film, whose one single freak-out moment is reserved for a cheap CGI face gimmick and a bunch of breaking glass (because, you know, yelling solves everything). And outside of Moore herself, the rest of the characters might as well be forgotten also, because they're about as memorable and deep as the aliens. Honestly, this film should have ended 20 minutes in - Moore finds out she's nuts, she's locked up, the end. Nice, neat, and a big time-saver. A shame her talents went toward such a lazily-written film. Expand
  6. Jun 8, 2013
    3
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. I loved the first half...the pacing especially. The film follows a woman who is grieving over the loss of her son, and then during that process, she's informed that her son didn't exist. The plot progressed nicely and was aided by the solid performances by Julianne Moore and Dominic West. Then there was sudden shift about 3/4's of the way through the film where it just all went downhill. The plot got really confusing, and then the ending was like...wtf. Overall, a decent and entertaining film, but I was slightly disappointed because I thought it had potential. Expand
  7. Apr 20, 2014
    2
    Is it a good concept? yeah but the result is really boring, gosh,i ****** hate this movie. It's really long for nothing the acting is bad andIs it a good concept? yeah but the result is really boring, gosh,i ****** hate this movie. It's really long for nothing the acting is bad and the result is horribly bad. Expand

See all 68 User Reviews

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