Metascore
67

Generally favorable reviews - based on 28 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 19 out of 28
  2. Negative: 1 out of 28
  1. Reviewed by: Lisa Schwarzbaum
    Aug 3, 2011
    91
    As she did in her striking 2005 debut, "Me and You and Everyone We Know," July creates a fluid cinematic universe.
  2. Reviewed by: Noel Murray
    Jul 28, 2011
    91
    The Future's main characters are, undeniably, dopes. But July and Linklater turn their ineptitude into a funny running joke, which becomes surprisingly affecting in the second half.
  3. Reviewed by: Steven Rea
    Aug 11, 2011
    88
    A meditation on mortality, on loneliness, on the way technology and narcissism have intersected to create a fascinating monster, The Future is all of this and more. What Frank Capra would have made of it, who knows? But he would have liked its star.
  4. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Aug 3, 2011
    88
    On the surface, this film is an enchanting meditation. At its core is the hard steel of individuality.
  5. Reviewed by: Michelle Orange
    Jul 28, 2011
    85
    July is more of a presence than an actress, or even a believable persona.
  6. Reviewed by: Eric Kohn
    Jul 25, 2011
    83
    As the portrait of a relationship meltdown involving two eccentric creative types prone to self-doubt, July's sophomore feature bears a strong resemblance to husband Mike Mills's upcoming "Beginners," although July's version of the story has a more experimental edge.
  7. Reviewed by: David Hughes
    Oct 31, 2011
    80
    July's second film, while not quite as perfectly realised as her debut, nimbly avoids the 'sophomore slump', providing the curious with another window into her highly idiosyncratic world.
  8. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Aug 20, 2011
    80
    Some people will find Miranda July's film a poetic triumph, a meditation on responsibility and disappointment. Others will find it hopelessly pretentious, one of those movies only pointy-headed critics can abide. I found the film to be more of the former than the latter. Except when the cat talks.
  9. Reviewed by: A.O. Scott
    Jul 28, 2011
    80
    The magical, metaphorical strain in The Future is what makes it powerful, unsettling and strange, as well as charming. The everyday fears and frustrations that shadow us on our awkward trip through the life cycle often feel enormous, even cosmic, and Ms. July has the audacity to find images and situations that give form to those metaphysical inklings.
  10. 75
    It can definitely grate on your nerves but, at best, it also gets into your mind, and sticks fast.
  11. Reviewed by: Ann Hornaday
    Aug 4, 2011
    75
    What does The Future hold? Wonders, each of them weirder and more unnerving than the last.
  12. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    Aug 4, 2011
    75
    Halfway into this film, I wanted to smack the mopey bohemian couple played by July and Hamish Linklater; by the end, I realized the director was smacking them for me, and hard. In a case of biting the hand that feeds her, July has made possibly the worst date movie ever for trendy modern couples - a work that traps a pair of passive-aggressive hipsters in a drift of their own making.
  13. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    Aug 4, 2011
    75
    This sense of unruly behavior is mitigated, deliberately, by the gentleness and odd comic grace of July's presence and voice.
  14. Reviewed by: J.R. Jones
    Aug 4, 2011
    70
    This is worth seeing, but only if you think you can tolerate the precious voice-over narration from the couple's wounded cat, delivered by July in a high, scratchy voice.
  15. Reviewed by: Anthony Lane
    Jul 31, 2011
    70
    The movie, which Miranda July wrote and directed, is pretty sharp, not to say acidic, on the silliness of good intentions, but she also takes care to slant the best lines toward the subject of time, and its terrible crawl.
  16. Reviewed by: Ray Greene
    Jul 24, 2011
    70
    July has mounted a surrealist fable about the delicate balance between relationships and the inner monologue inside each lover, with its incessant demands and individual needs. Unevenness is an aesthetic here - not so much a flaw as a conscious choice.
  17. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Aug 11, 2011
    67
    July, like Hal Hartley, another overrated art-house luminary, is an acquired taste I have yet to acquire.
  18. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Aug 19, 2011
    63
    July is a provocative and honorably independent filmmaker, but given the meager rewards of investing our time, The Future wasn't worth the wait.
  19. Reviewed by: Sara Stewart
    Jul 29, 2011
    63
    The omnipresence of oddity in The Future dilutes its charm: A T-shirt creeps around on its own, a little girl likes being buried neck-deep in the backyard. Whatevs.
  20. Reviewed by: Joshua Rothkopf
    Jul 26, 2011
    60
    The mood of this movie will brew with you for a while, even if it swirls around characters who aren't quite persuasive.
  21. 60
    This could be the premise of a zany comedy, but the mood of The Future is, from the outset, defeatist - annoyingly defeatist, to be frank.
  22. Reviewed by: Peter Debruge
    Jul 24, 2011
    60
    For all the superficial hilarity of July's approach, a much sadder streak runs deep through the entire film, reinforced by Jon Brion's score (more tones than melody). Still, it's curious that this is the feeling she chooses to leave us with in the end.
  23. Reviewed by: Shawn Levy
    Aug 11, 2011
    58
    The art of Miranda July, the former Portlander and hyphenate extraordinaire, balances on the edge of the cunning and the precious, of depth and naivety, of the fetching and (sorry) the revolting.
  24. Reviewed by: Mick LaSalle
    Aug 18, 2011
    50
    July also narrates the film, in voiceover, as the cat, and every time she does, it's a white-knuckle thing. You have to hold on until she stops.
  25. Reviewed by: J. Hoberman
    Jul 26, 2011
    50
    Sophie's (or is it July's?) coy narcissism becomes a criticism of itself, and her "sadness" turns into something truly sad. In short, I have seen The Future and it's heartbreaking.
  26. Reviewed by: Kimberley Jones
    Aug 11, 2011
    40
    As an unsparing portrait of disaffection among the small-paycheck, faux-creative class, The Future is rather astute … which isn't to say it isn't also bang-your-head-on-the-wall annoying.
  27. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Jul 29, 2011
    40
    Sometimes these characters say things worth hearing. But too often, and in contrast to her first feature, "Me and You and Everyone We Know," July's calculated delivery doesn't reveal the profundity required to elevate it beyond a self-conscious deadpan.
  28. Reviewed by: Andrew Schenker
    Jul 24, 2011
    38
    Of all the vaguely philosophical, calculatedly left-of-center dialogue that peppers Miranda July's The Future, no line is more telling than the writer/director/star's late-film declaration, in the guise of her character Sophie, that "I'm saying okay to nothing."
User Score
5.9

Mixed or average reviews- based on 29 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 11
  2. Negative: 4 out of 11
  1. Jan 14, 2012
    3
    I liked 'You and Me' (prior film) pretty well, the kids were likable. This film starts out great and quietly warm and quirky and then derailsI liked 'You and Me' (prior film) pretty well, the kids were likable. This film starts out great and quietly warm and quirky and then derails into a sad, sad tale of adult characters who are doing nothing much except act badly in the face of a made-up deadline. The original idea started out quite funny, how could this thing have gone so wrong and needlessly humorless? This writer has obviously found quite a sympathetic audience since the user ratings here are high for a film that mainstream viewers will almost certainly abandon before it's finished. I am usually a fan of slow, quirky, indie films, but there has to be someone in there to like! I'll give it a 3 for an original opening premise and I like the actors, but otherwise, there is no there there. Full Review »
  2. Dec 28, 2011
    9
    A breathtaking and unbelievably innovating movie, truly some of the most creative and original storylines of modern cinema. VeryA breathtaking and unbelievably innovating movie, truly some of the most creative and original storylines of modern cinema. Very philosophical, it will make you drop all of your ideas to the floor and rise them back up to the roof. All of this around an adorable love story that will make yourself question what love truly is. Inspires deep reflection and very mind blowing, a movie that will leave you thinking for days. Alongside with a very detailed artistic production, a story to remember. Full Review »
  3. Aug 18, 2011
    6
    Any audience member who has seen a previous Miranda July film knows what they are in for if they go to another one. July loves silly andAny audience member who has seen a previous Miranda July film knows what they are in for if they go to another one. July loves silly and awkward conversations which spring out of thin air and make her characters seem quirky. If you love quirky and oddball then Miranda July is the filmmaker for you. However, July is one of those filmmakers who do not have much a gray area when it comes to reactions. Movie goers either love her or cannot stand her. Julyâ Full Review »