Paramount Pictures | Release Date: March 11, 1972
9.1
USER SCORE
Universal acclaim based on 1988 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
1,842
Mixed:
58
Negative:
88
WATCH NOW
Stream On
Stream On
Review this movie
VOTE NOW
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Check box if your review contains spoilers 0 characters (5000 max)
10
HappyislandsJan 9, 2017
Perfection from start to finish. Well actually, not quite perfection. There's a bit where Sonny punches Carlo Rizzi and you can clearly see there's about a foot of fresh air between the Sonny's fist and Carlo's face. And Officer McCluskyPerfection from start to finish. Well actually, not quite perfection. There's a bit where Sonny punches Carlo Rizzi and you can clearly see there's about a foot of fresh air between the Sonny's fist and Carlo's face. And Officer McClusky blinks when he's supposed to be dead. Apart from that - perfection. That simple, that complicated. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
8
BroyaxJan 6, 2017
J'avais dû voir ce film en diagonale ou alors je ne m'en rappelais plus (les privilèges de l'âge) et tout ce que j'avais en tête, c'était l'incroyable numéro de Marlon Brando avec ses bajoues, sa voix de vieillard asthmatique et sa diction,J'avais dû voir ce film en diagonale ou alors je ne m'en rappelais plus (les privilèges de l'âge) et tout ce que j'avais en tête, c'était l'incroyable numéro de Marlon Brando avec ses bajoues, sa voix de vieillard asthmatique et sa diction, son phrasé traînant, ses mimiques ou plutôt sa mimique particulière, cette moue perpétuelle qui le fait ressembler à Droopy... alors qu'il parle de respect, de service et d'offre...

Le début du film m'a replongé illico dans ce qui paraît une satire du mafieux archétypal, le mafioso fondateur, le patriarche de sa tribu, en un mot : le parrain ! Drôle donc, hilarant, à se taper le cul par terre... puis les minutes s'égrènent, le personnage se précise et les heures passant (oui, presque trois plombes entières le bousin) la stature de Brando, imposante, s'impose d'elle-même : on ne rit plus, on se tait... et on admire. On respecte.

A posteriori Brando apparaît alors comme le seul acteur capable d'imposer un tel respect à son rôle et à le rendre en fin de compte aussi charismatique qu'humain. Bien entendu, le reste de la distribution... n'est pas en reste avec sa pléthore de jeunes stars (dont Pacino et Caan) et ses rôles secondaires solides comme l'indispensable Robert Duvall par exemple.

La mise en scène de Coppola s'impose également d'elle-même malgré sa tendance à s'étirer un peu trop : elle demeure tirée au cordeau, l'ensemble est cadré avec soin et monté avec intelligence.

Bien entendu, Le Parrain ne serait pas ce qu'il est (une histoire de famille et de fureur) sans la musique enquiquinante de Nino Rota, habituellement abonné aux fariboles de Fellini mais qui livre et module ici deux thèmes nostalgiques et mélancoliques à l'envi.

Le film a donc bien vieilli et ne vieillira plus et fait partie malgré ses tics, des "classiques".
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
QuijoteDec 14, 2016
Realmente una maravilla a todo nivel, más que una adaptación de una novela, es una creación cinematográfica en sí misma, dada la participación de Mario Puzo. Merecida toda la gloria que tiene. La música se lleva buena parte del mérito, dadaRealmente una maravilla a todo nivel, más que una adaptación de una novela, es una creación cinematográfica en sí misma, dada la participación de Mario Puzo. Merecida toda la gloria que tiene. La música se lleva buena parte del mérito, dada la mística y magia que le aporta. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
gDec 6, 2016
A masterpiece. How can the Earth continue without Coppola's The Godfather. One of the most iconic films ever talked about worldwide and acclaimed well by everybody, it's more fun to talk about it.
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
All this user's reviews
10
BonnyscottyNov 13, 2016
Absolutely, positively the greatest movie ever made. Every frame is perfection from start to finish. It will never be bettered. There is nothing more to add.
2 of 2 users found this helpful20
All this user's reviews
9
duckhostJul 25, 2016
[PT-BR] Esse filme é simplesmente obrigatório na lista de filmes assistidos de qualquer pessoa! É um dos melhores filmes já feitos e até hoje consegue se segurar, qualquer nota abaixo de 9 para esse filme não basta, eu só dou um nove pois a[PT-BR] Esse filme é simplesmente obrigatório na lista de filmes assistidos de qualquer pessoa! É um dos melhores filmes já feitos e até hoje consegue se segurar, qualquer nota abaixo de 9 para esse filme não basta, eu só dou um nove pois a primeira vez que eu vi esse filme achei o seu roteiro meio confuso e somente uma segunda vez vendo o filme consegue compreender totalmente a história. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
9
2016Jun 30, 2016
The godfather reflects what is a movie with a solid script, the best movie of crime, the scenes of shots are just in the most appropriate moment, Francis Ford Coppola directs the best movie of the history apart from the great distribution ofThe godfather reflects what is a movie with a solid script, the best movie of crime, the scenes of shots are just in the most appropriate moment, Francis Ford Coppola directs the best movie of the history apart from the great distribution of luxury that they have Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
starburnsMay 26, 2016
It doesn't really matter how I feel about this movie. It's over 40 years old and it is directed by one of the most infamous criminal drama movie directors of all time. I still think part 2 is better though. Part three is the worst movie ever made.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
aadityamudharApr 17, 2016
Like Babe Ruth is to baseball, like John Steinbeck is to writing, their is no doubt about it, The Godfather is the greatest film of all time. Never before have we seen performances so stellar, by Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan, RobertLike Babe Ruth is to baseball, like John Steinbeck is to writing, their is no doubt about it, The Godfather is the greatest film of all time. Never before have we seen performances so stellar, by Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan, Robert Duvall, and everyone else! The Godfather has little life lessons everywhere. Along with an engaging plot, that just completes the most critically acclaimed film of all time. The Godfather is Francis Ford Coppola's masterpiece. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
JuanLuisGG14Apr 10, 2016
Incredible classic, full of thrilling moments and extense great soundtrack.
Marlon Brando performance is stunning from start to finish, and mixing it with a perfect plot of the growing kid which Michael (Al Pacino) is to the family Corleone
Incredible classic, full of thrilling moments and extense great soundtrack.
Marlon Brando performance is stunning from start to finish, and mixing it with a perfect plot of the growing kid which Michael (Al Pacino) is to the family Corleone gives the feeling of one of the best cinematography can offer.
10/10
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
MovieMasterEdMar 22, 2016
Rarely can it be said that a film has defined a genre, but never is that more true than in the case of The Godfather. Since the release of the 1972 epic (which garnered ten Academy Award nominations and was named Best Picture), all "gangsterRarely can it be said that a film has defined a genre, but never is that more true than in the case of The Godfather. Since the release of the 1972 epic (which garnered ten Academy Award nominations and was named Best Picture), all "gangster movies" have been judged by the standards of this one (unfair as the comparison may be). If a film is about Jewish mobsters, it's a "Jewish Godfather"; if it's about the Chinese underworld, it's an "Oriental Godfather"; if it takes place in contemporary times, it's a "modern day Godfather."

If The Godfather was only about gun-toting Mafia types, it would never have garnered as many accolades. The characteristic that sets this film apart from so many of its predecessors and successors is its ability to weave the often-disparate layers of story into a cohesive whole. Any of the individual issues explored by The Godfather are strong enough to form the foundation of a movie. Here, however, bolstered by so many complimentary themes, each is given added resonance. The picture is a series of mini-climaxes, all building to the devastating, definitive conclusion.

Rarely does a film tell as many diverse-yet-interconnected stories. Strong performances, solid directing, and a tightly-plotted script all contribute to The Godfather's success. This motion picture was not slapped together to satiate the appetite of the masses; it was carefully and painstakingly crafted. Every major character - and more than a few minor ones - is molded into a distinct, complex individual. Stereotypes did not influence Coppola's film, although certain ones were formed as a result of it.

The Corleone with the most screen time is Michael (it's therefore odd that Al Pacino received a Best Supporting Actor nomination), and his tale, because of its scope and breadth, is marginally dominant. His transformation from "innocent" bystander to central manipulator is the stuff of a Shakespearean tragedy. By the end, this man who claimed to be different from the rest of his family has become more ruthless than Don Vito ever was.

Despite the likes of Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, Scarface, ...And Justice for All, and Scent of a Woman on his resume, Pacino is best remembered for the role he created in The Godfather (and subsequently reprised in two sequels). While this is not his most demonstrative performance - indeed, he is exceptionally restrained - the quality of the script makes Michael Corleone notable.

Next to Humphrey Bogart's Rick from Casablanca, Oscar winner Marlon Brando's Don Vito may be the most imitated character in screen history. The line "I'm gonna make him an offer he can't refuse" has attained legendary status, as has the entire performance. With his raspy voice, deliberate movements, and penetrating stare, Brando has created a personae that will be recalled for as long as motion pictures exist.

Don Vito is a most complicated gangster. In his own words, he is not a killer, and he never mixes business with personal matters. He puts family first ("A man who doesn't spend time with his family can never be a real man") and despises displays of weakness. He understands the burden of power, and his wordless sympathy for Michael when he is forced to assume the "throne", is one of The Godfather's most revealing moments (about both father and son).

The Godfather had three Best Supporting Actor nominees, all well-deserved. The first was Pacino (who probably should have been nominated alongside Brando in the Best Actor category). The other two were James Caan and Robert Duvall. In a way, it's surprising that Duvall wasn't passed over. His presence in The Godfather isn't flashy or attention-arresting. Like his character of Tom Hagen, he is steady, reliable, and stays in the background. Not so for Caan's Sonny, whose demonstrative and volatile personality can't be overlooked.

Family responsibility. A father's legacy. The need to earn respect. The corrupting influence of power. These are some of the ingredients combined in Francis Ford Coppola's cinematic blender. They are themes which have intrigued the greatest authors of every medium through the centuries.

We come to The Godfather like Kay Adams - outsiders uncertain in our expectations - but it doesn't take long for us to be captivated by this intricate, violent world. The film can be viewed on many levels, with equal satisfaction awaiting those who just want a good story, and those who demand much more. The Godfather is long, yes - but it is one-hundred seventy minutes well-spent. When the closing credits roll, only a portion of the story has been told. Yet that last haunting image (Kay's shock of recognition), coupled with Nino Rota's mournful score, leaves a crater-like impression that The Godfather Part II only deepens.
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
PachekoviskMar 16, 2016
MASTERPIECE
One of the greatest films of all time and probably the best mafia film of all time!
The Godfather is surely a timeless film that will live forever as a inspirational movie to countless filmmakers.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
domnels234Mar 16, 2016
Old school mafia flick about old school mafiosis. Greatest movie of all time in my and a lot of ohters opinons. Great acting and is still, to this day, very entertaining.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
CinemassacreMar 13, 2016
Rarely can it be said that a film has defined a genre, but never is that more true than in the case of The Godfather. Since the release of the 1972 epic (which garnered ten Academy Award nominations and was named Best Picture), all "gangsterRarely can it be said that a film has defined a genre, but never is that more true than in the case of The Godfather. Since the release of the 1972 epic (which garnered ten Academy Award nominations and was named Best Picture), all "gangster movies" have been judged by the standards of this one (unfair as the comparison may be). If a film is about Jewish mobsters, it's a "Jewish Godfather"; if it's about the Chinese underworld, it's an "Oriental Godfather"; if it takes place in contemporary times, it's a "modern day Godfather."

If The Godfather was only about gun-toting Mafia types, it would never have garnered as many accolades. The characteristic that sets this film apart from so many of its predecessors and successors is its ability to weave the often-disparate layers of story into a cohesive whole. Any of the individual issues explored by The Godfather are strong enough to form the foundation of a movie. Here, however, bolstered by so many complimentary themes, each is given added resonance. The picture is a series of mini-climaxes, all building to the devastating, definitive conclusion.

Rarely does a film tell as many diverse-yet-interconnected stories. Strong performances, solid directing, and a tightly-plotted script all contribute to The Godfather's success. This motion picture was not slapped together to satiate the appetite of the masses; it was carefully and painstakingly crafted. Every major character - and more than a few minor ones - is molded into a distinct, complex individual. Stereotypes did not influence Coppola's film, although certain ones were formed as a result of it.

Despite the likes of Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, Scarface, ...And Justice for All, and Scent of a Woman on his resume, Pacino is best remembered for the role he created in The Godfather (and subsequently reprised in two sequels). While this is not his most demonstrative performance - indeed, he is exceptionally restrained - the quality of the script makes Michael Corleone notable.

Don Vito is a most complicated gangster. In his own words, he is not a killer, and he never mixes business with personal matters. He puts family first ("A man who doesn't spend time with his family can never be a real man") and despises displays of weakness. He understands the burden of power, and his wordless sympathy for Michael when he is forced to assume the "throne", is one of The Godfather's most revealing moments (about both father and son).

The Godfather had three Best Supporting Actor nominees, all well-deserved. The first was Pacino (who probably should have been nominated alongside Brando in the Best Actor category). The other two were James Caan and Robert Duvall. In a way, it's surprising that Duvall wasn't passed over. His presence in The Godfather isn't flashy or attention-arresting. Like his character of Tom Hagen, he is steady, reliable, and stays in the background. Not so for Caan's Sonny, whose demonstrative and volatile personality can't be overlooked.

Family responsibility. A father's legacy. The need to earn respect. The corrupting influence of power. These are some of the ingredients combined in Francis Ford Coppola's cinematic blender. They are themes which have intrigued the greatest authors of every medium through the centuries.

Although the issues presented in The Godfather are universal in scope, the characters and setting are decidedly ethnic. Even to this day, there is an odd romanticism associated with New York's Italian crime families. The word "Mafia" conjures up images of the sinister and mysterious - scenes of the sort where Luca Brasi meets his fate. Francis Ford Coppola has tapped into this fascination and woven it as yet another element of the many that make his motion picture a compelling experience.

We come to The Godfather like Kay Adams - outsiders uncertain in our expectations - but it doesn't take long for us to be captivated by this intricate, violent world. The film can be viewed on many levels, with equal satisfaction awaiting those who just want a good story, and those who demand much more. The Godfather is long, yes - but it is one-hundred seventy minutes well-spent. When the closing credits roll, only a portion of the story has been told. Yet that last haunting image (Kay's shock of recognition), coupled with Nino Rota's mournful score, leaves a crater-like impression that The Godfather Part II only deepens.
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
8
BrandonBD85Feb 21, 2016
I understand why this film is popular and i understand how some can like more than other films. What i cant wrap my head around is it being hailed as "the greatest of all time". There many other movies that transcend time more than TheI understand why this film is popular and i understand how some can like more than other films. What i cant wrap my head around is it being hailed as "the greatest of all time". There many other movies that transcend time more than The Godfather and have slightly better plot. Don't get me wrong it is a very good film, but its greatness has been slowly blown up over the years. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
JfilmLJan 15, 2016
This is one of my favourite films of all time, it is simply majestic. The acting is phenomenal, the story is brilliant and the music is stunning. It is one of the most if not the most complete film of all time that is a must see for anyoneThis is one of my favourite films of all time, it is simply majestic. The acting is phenomenal, the story is brilliant and the music is stunning. It is one of the most if not the most complete film of all time that is a must see for anyone who enjoys films. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
scarfakeJan 8, 2016
movie doesn't continue fast. it tells you everything. you learn about their life. dialogues talk to you. it is very realistic film like our lifes. acting is perfect. i understood again why marlon brando is the best actor. it teachs you aboutmovie doesn't continue fast. it tells you everything. you learn about their life. dialogues talk to you. it is very realistic film like our lifes. acting is perfect. i understood again why marlon brando is the best actor. it teachs you about life lessons. it is summit of all movies Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
EpicLadySpongeJan 5, 2016
It's too strong to be given a 10 anyways, but I think it deserved the 10 due to how the Godfather managed to get everything a movie has always needed right.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
geo333Dec 15, 2015
The Godfather is a testament that a wonderful story sometimes makes a great movie to a fantastic one. Driven by Marlon Brando, Al Pacino performances and the rest of the cast bring to life the gangster world to a perfection. In the end, theThe Godfather is a testament that a wonderful story sometimes makes a great movie to a fantastic one. Driven by Marlon Brando, Al Pacino performances and the rest of the cast bring to life the gangster world to a perfection. In the end, the only thing that hasn't age well is running time besides it, its a perfect film. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
All this user's reviews
10
marcelgermannNov 7, 2015
The Godfather
Tolle Musik, gute Schauspieler, spannende komplexe Mafia-Story
Die Charaktere sind klasse, es gibt Konflikte in der Liebe, Familie aber auch im Geschäft. Der Film hat einen sehr realistischen Ton und ist glaubwürdig erzählt.
The Godfather
Tolle Musik, gute Schauspieler, spannende komplexe Mafia-Story
Die Charaktere sind klasse, es gibt Konflikte in der Liebe, Familie aber auch im Geschäft.
Der Film hat einen sehr realistischen Ton und ist glaubwürdig erzählt.
Francis Ford Coppola, Marlon Brando und Al Pacino liefern den besten Film aller Zeiten ab
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
jedwardsAug 30, 2015
This is an absolutely incredible film that draws you in from the opening and keeps you firmly immersed until the ending. Easily one of the best films i have ever seen and one that everyone should watch at least once.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
9
adamjneveAug 29, 2015
Often advertised to me as the perfect movie, the best movie I'll ever see, and/or the be-all-end-all to movie-dom. It is a damn good movie. There's a reason Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton, and James Caan are householdOften advertised to me as the perfect movie, the best movie I'll ever see, and/or the be-all-end-all to movie-dom. It is a damn good movie. There's a reason Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton, and James Caan are household names. This movie is chock full of stellar performances, beautiful shots, and a compelling family saga. If it is too long (it is), a little slow in places (it is) and somewhat hard to follow in certain places (yep) we can forgive it, because they just don't make movies like this anymore. It isn't perfect, but it is a masterpiece. Do yourself a favor, and let yourself be carried along with the current of this slow-moving, but powerful, bit of culture. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
DannyMDB1Aug 14, 2015
"The Godfather" (1972) is hands down the greatest movie of all time. I know I've began a bit steep with my introduction but it's the truth. I know that film experts and academics will say that the likes of "Battleship Potemkin" (1925) by"The Godfather" (1972) is hands down the greatest movie of all time. I know I've began a bit steep with my introduction but it's the truth. I know that film experts and academics will say that the likes of "Battleship Potemkin" (1925) by Sergei Eisenstein and the one and only "Citizen Kane" (1941) by Orson Welles are better. No! In my opinion, those movies are more important to the industry than "The Godfather", but important doesn't mean better. In terms of quality, "The Godfather" is unrivaled.
This movie encompasses in the most efficient way possible all the elements of cinema. Everything from a blunt flawless script filled with quotable lines like "I'm gonna make him an offer he can't refuse" or the improvised "Leave the gun, take the cannoli" to the iconic performance of Marlon Brando as Don Vito Corleone. The actor revolutionised acting by transforming not only psychologically into the character, but also physically. How? Well, by putting cotton balls in his mouth and spawning a now iconic soft but firm voice which fits perfectly.
On the surface, you may consider "The Godfather" as a Mafia movie, but actually, it's more of a movie about the values of morality in a patriarchal family.
The reason why this movie is so masterful is the way it manages to make the viewer sympathise these mobsters. It is, by far, the most personal film ever made, and this manages to push the viewer into the very minds of this family, making us understand why one might take such murderous actions. For instance, Michael, Don Vito Corleone's son has to commit a double murder just so he can guarantee his father's safety.
As for the protagonist, Don Vito Corleone is not a difficult character to understand, on the contrary, his personality is very well defined. His personality is actually surprising for the world he lives in, being a true paragon, trying to avoid doing questionable things as much as possible. The Godfather refuses to take up the drug smuggling business even if this might affect his crime empire and after his son, Sonny, is killed by a rival mob, he doesn't want revenge, but peace. No more blood!
The script offers many engaging moments, especially Michael's transformation throughout the movie from a righteous soldier returning home from the War at his sister's wedding, which is a typical catholic wedding with typical San-Remo Festival-ish music, into a ruthless leader of the Corleone Crime Family, opposite to his father.
To conclude, "The Godfather" is a true masterpiece, an iconic movie and the greatest film of all time thanks to its unique personal approach which made you feel as if you've been living alongside these characters all your life. Simply astonishing! Francis Ford Coppola's crowning achievement!
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
ScreenJunkiesJun 25, 2015
Rarely can it be said that a film has defined a genre, but never is that more true than in the case of The Godfather. Since the release of the 1972 epic (which garnered ten Academy Award nominations and was named Best Picture), all "gangsterRarely can it be said that a film has defined a genre, but never is that more true than in the case of The Godfather. Since the release of the 1972 epic (which garnered ten Academy Award nominations and was named Best Picture), all "gangster movies" have been judged by the standards of this one (unfair as the comparison may be). If a film is about Jewish mobsters, it's a "Jewish Godfather"; if it's about the Chinese underworld, it's an "Oriental Godfather"; if it takes place in contemporary times, it's a "modern day Godfather."

If The Godfather was only about gun-toting Mafia types, it would never have garnered as many accolades. The characteristic that sets this film apart from so many of its predecessors and successors is its ability to weave the often-disparate layers of story into a cohesive whole. Any of the individual issues explored by The Godfather are strong enough to form the foundation of a movie. Here, however, bolstered by so many complimentary themes, each is given added resonance. The picture is a series of mini-climaxes, all building to the devastating, definitive conclusion.

Rarely does a film tell as many diverse-yet-interconnected stories. Strong performances, solid directing, and a tightly-plotted script all contribute to The Godfather's success. This motion picture was not slapped together to satiate the appetite of the masses; it was carefully and painstakingly crafted. Every major character - and more than a few minor ones - is molded into a distinct, complex individual. Stereotypes did not influence Coppola's film, although certain ones were formed as a result of it.

The film opens in the study of Don Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando), the Godfather, who is holding court. It is the wedding of his daughter Connie (Talia Shire), and no Sicilian can refuse a request on that day. So the supplicants come, each wanting something different - revenge, a husband for their daughter, a part in a movie.

The Corleone with the most screen time is Michael (it's therefore odd that Al Pacino received a Best Supporting Actor nomination), and his tale, because of its scope and breadth, is marginally dominant. His transformation from "innocent" bystander to central manipulator is the stuff of a Shakespearean tragedy. By the end, this man who claimed to be different from the rest of his family has become more ruthless than Don Vito ever was.

Despite the likes of Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, Scarface, ...And Justice for All, and Scent of a Woman on his resume, Pacino is best remembered for the role he created in The Godfather (and subsequently reprised in two sequels). While this is not his most demonstrative performance - indeed, he is exceptionally restrained - the quality of the script makes Michael Corleone notable.

The Godfather had three Best Supporting Actor nominees, all well-deserved. The first was Pacino (who probably should have been nominated alongside Brando in the Best Actor category). The other two were James Caan and Robert Duvall. In a way, it's surprising that Duvall wasn't passed over. His presence in The Godfather isn't flashy or attention-arresting. Like his character of Tom Hagen, he is steady, reliable, and stays in the background. Not so for Caan's Sonny, whose demonstrative and volatile personality can't be overlooked.

Family responsibility. A father's legacy. The need to earn respect. The corrupting influence of power. These are some of the ingredients combined in Francis Ford Coppola's cinematic blender. They are themes which have intrigued the greatest authors of every medium through the centuries.

Although the issues presented in The Godfather are universal in scope, the characters and setting are decidedly ethnic. Even to this day, there is an odd romanticism associated with New York's Italian crime families. The word "Mafia" conjures up images of the sinister and mysterious - scenes of the sort where Luca Brasi meets his fate. Francis Ford Coppola has tapped into this fascination and woven it as yet another element of the many that make his motion picture a compelling experience.

We come to The Godfather like Kay Adams - outsiders uncertain in our expectations - but it doesn't take long for us to be captivated by this intricate, violent world. The film can be viewed on many levels, with equal satisfaction awaiting those who just want a good story, and those who demand much more. The Godfather is long, yes - but it is one-hundred seventy minutes well-spent. When the closing credits roll, only a portion of the story has been told. Yet that last haunting image (Kay's shock of recognition), coupled with Nino Rota's mournful score, leaves a crater-like impression that The Godfather Part II only deepens.
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
8
devo-ncMay 16, 2015
Very good film, resonating and thematically legendary. It is a little slow for my taste, but even though it's very long Godfather is dramatically near perfect.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
CinemaBlendMay 6, 2015
Rarely can it be said that a film has defined a genre, but never is that more true than in the case of The Godfather. Since the release of the 1972 epic (which garnered ten Academy Award nominations and was named Best Picture), all "gangsterRarely can it be said that a film has defined a genre, but never is that more true than in the case of The Godfather. Since the release of the 1972 epic (which garnered ten Academy Award nominations and was named Best Picture), all "gangster movies" have been judged by the standards of this one (unfair as the comparison may be). If a film is about Jewish mobsters, it's a "Jewish Godfather"; if it's about the Chinese underworld, it's an "Oriental Godfather"; if it takes place in contemporary times, it's a "modern day Godfather."

If The Godfather was only about gun-toting Mafia types, it would never have garnered as many accolades. The characteristic that sets this film apart from so many of its predecessors and successors is its ability to weave the often-disparate layers of story into a cohesive whole. Any of the individual issues explored by The Godfather are strong enough to form the foundation of a movie. Here, however, bolstered by so many complimentary themes, each is given added resonance. The picture is a series of mini-climaxes, all building to the devastating, definitive conclusion.

Rarely does a film tell as many diverse-yet-interconnected stories. Strong performances, solid directing, and a tightly-plotted script all contribute to The Godfather's success. This motion picture was not slapped together to satiate the appetite of the masses; it was carefully and painstakingly crafted. Every major character - and more than a few minor ones - is molded into a distinct, complex individual. Stereotypes did not influence Coppola's film, although certain ones were formed as a result of it.

Despite the likes of Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, Scarface, ...And Justice for All, and Scent of a Woman on his resume, Pacino is best remembered for the role he created in The Godfather (and subsequently reprised in two sequels). While this is not his most demonstrative performance - indeed, he is exceptionally restrained - the quality of the script makes Michael Corleone notable.

Next to Humphrey Bogart's Rick from Casablanca, Oscar winner Marlon Brando's Don Vito may be the most imitated character in screen history. The line "I'm gonna make him an offer he can't refuse" has attained legendary status, as has the entire performance. With his raspy voice, deliberate movements, and penetrating stare, Brando has created a personae that will be recalled for as long as motion pictures exist.

Don Vito is a most complicated gangster. In his own words, he is not a killer, and he never mixes business with personal matters. He puts family first ("A man who doesn't spend time with his family can never be a real man") and despises displays of weakness. He understands the burden of power, and his wordless sympathy for Michael when he is forced to assume the "throne", is one of The Godfather's most revealing moments (about both father and son).

We come to The Godfather like Kay Adams - outsiders uncertain in our expectations - but it doesn't take long for us to be captivated by this intricate, violent world. The film can be viewed on many levels, with equal satisfaction awaiting those who just want a good story, and those who demand much more. The Godfather is long, yes - but it is one-hundred seventy minutes well-spent. When the closing credits roll, only a portion of the story has been told. Yet that last haunting image (Kay's shock of recognition), coupled with Nino Rota's mournful score, leaves a crater-like impression that The Godfather Part II only deepens.
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
VinceRocks123Apr 29, 2015
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Like the modern Shakespearean tragedy, the Godfather is very symbolic in storytelling that out bests other great movies before and after. The story about the loss of innocence caused by the life of the mafia and loyalty to the family. Its one of those few films that is still clashing with Citizen Kane as the greatest film ever made.

Marlon Brando plays his iconic role well as the Mafia Don Vito Corleone of the Corleone family, a wealthy and powerful family crime syndicate, who falls into despair when his idealistic younger son Michael, in a chilling performance by Al Pacino, decides to turn away from a bright life, when other rival drug lords and fellow gangster organizations declare war against them, and the ending is tragically unbearable as Michael's life of idealism is corrupted by greed, power,and violence as Vito lays dying from the wounds of his assassination attempts.

A film so utterly powerful and legendarily well told, its one of those rare films that has a powerful story and well domineering performances that makes it so great, it is the reason why its talked about everywhere. Francis Ford Coppola has made his mark in cinema history bringing Mario Puzo's shocking gangster fictional novel into a monument of pure entertainment.

A fine film featuring additional A+ performances by Robert Duvall, James Caan, Talia Shire, Diane Keaton and the late John Cazale as Michael's friends who are divided emotionally by innocence and gangster-hood, a important element that makes this a film shadowed with irony and grief.

a important masterpiece of life and sin

and if thought it couldn't be any more tragic wait till you see part 2
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
CineFilesApr 29, 2015
Rarely can it be said that a film has defined a genre, but never is that more true than in the case of The Godfather. Since the release of the 1972 epic (which garnered ten Academy Award nominations and was named Best Picture), all "gangsterRarely can it be said that a film has defined a genre, but never is that more true than in the case of The Godfather. Since the release of the 1972 epic (which garnered ten Academy Award nominations and was named Best Picture), all "gangster movies" have been judged by the standards of this one (unfair as the comparison may be). If a film is about Jewish mobsters, it's a "Jewish Godfather"; if it's about the Chinese underworld, it's an "Oriental Godfather"; if it takes place in contemporary times, it's a "modern day Godfather."

If The Godfather was only about gun-toting Mafia types, it would never have garnered as many accolades. The characteristic that sets this film apart from so many of its predecessors and successors is its ability to weave the often-disparate layers of story into a cohesive whole. Any of the individual issues explored by The Godfather are strong enough to form the foundation of a movie. Here, however, bolstered by so many complimentary themes, each is given added resonance. The picture is a series of mini-climaxes, all building to the devastating, definitive conclusion.

Rarely does a film tell as many diverse-yet-interconnected stories. Strong performances, solid directing, and a tightly-plotted script all contribute to The Godfather's success. This motion picture was not slapped together to satiate the appetite of the masses; it was carefully and painstakingly crafted. Every major character - and more than a few minor ones - is molded into a distinct, complex individual. Stereotypes did not influence Coppola's film, although certain ones were formed as a result of it.

Despite the likes of Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, Scarface, ...And Justice for All, and Scent of a Woman on his resume, Pacino is best remembered for the role he created in The Godfather (and subsequently reprised in two sequels). While this is not his most demonstrative performance - indeed, he is exceptionally restrained - the quality of the script makes Michael Corleone notable.

Next to Humphrey Bogart's Rick from Casablanca, Oscar winner Marlon Brando's Don Vito may be the most imitated character in screen history. The line "I'm gonna make him an offer he can't refuse" has attained legendary status, as has the entire performance. With his raspy voice, deliberate movements, and penetrating stare, Brando has created a personae that will be recalled for as long as motion pictures exist.

The Godfather had three Best Supporting Actor nominees, all well-deserved. The first was Pacino (who probably should have been nominated alongside Brando in the Best Actor category). The other two were James Caan and Robert Duvall. In a way, it's surprising that Duvall wasn't passed over. His presence in The Godfather isn't flashy or attention-arresting. Like his character of Tom Hagen, he is steady, reliable, and stays in the background. Not so for Caan's Sonny, whose demonstrative and volatile personality can't be overlooked.

Family responsibility. A father's legacy. The need to earn respect. The corrupting influence of power. These are some of the ingredients combined in Francis Ford Coppola's cinematic blender. They are themes which have intrigued the greatest authors of every medium through the centuries.

Although the issues presented in The Godfather are universal in scope, the characters and setting are decidedly ethnic. Even to this day, there is an odd romanticism associated with New York's Italian crime families. The word "Mafia" conjures up images of the sinister and mysterious - scenes of the sort where Luca Brasi meets his fate. Francis Ford Coppola has tapped into this fascination and woven it as yet another element of the many that make his motion picture a compelling experience.

We come to The Godfather like Kay Adams - outsiders uncertain in our expectations - but it doesn't take long for us to be captivated by this intricate, violent world. The film can be viewed on many levels, with equal satisfaction awaiting those who just want a good story, and those who demand much more. The Godfather is long, yes - but it is one-hundred seventy minutes well-spent. When the closing credits roll, only a portion of the story has been told. Yet that last haunting image (Kay's shock of recognition), coupled with Nino Rota's mournful score, leaves a crater-like impression that The Godfather Part II only deepens.
Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
All this user's reviews
10
MovieManiac83Apr 24, 2015
Rarely can it be said that a film has defined a genre, but never is that more true than in the case of The Godfather. Since the release of the 1972 epic (which garnered ten Academy Award nominations and was named Best Picture), all "gangsterRarely can it be said that a film has defined a genre, but never is that more true than in the case of The Godfather. Since the release of the 1972 epic (which garnered ten Academy Award nominations and was named Best Picture), all "gangster movies" have been judged by the standards of this one (unfair as the comparison may be). If a film is about Jewish mobsters, it's a "Jewish Godfather"; if it's about the Chinese underworld, it's an "Oriental Godfather"; if it takes place in contemporary times, it's a "modern day Godfather."

If The Godfather was only about gun-toting Mafia types, it would never have garnered as many accolades. The characteristic that sets this film apart from so many of its predecessors and successors is its ability to weave the often-disparate layers of story into a cohesive whole. Any of the individual issues explored by The Godfather are strong enough to form the foundation of a movie. Here, however, bolstered by so many complimentary themes, each is given added resonance. The picture is a series of mini-climaxes, all building to the devastating, definitive conclusion.

Rarely does a film tell as many diverse-yet-interconnected stories. Strong performances, solid directing, and a tightly-plotted script all contribute to The Godfather's success. This motion picture was not slapped together to satiate the appetite of the masses; it was carefully and painstakingly crafted. Every major character - and more than a few minor ones - is molded into a distinct, complex individual. Stereotypes did not influence Coppola's film, although certain ones were formed as a result of it.

Despite the likes of Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, Scarface, ...And Justice for All, and Scent of a Woman on his resume, Pacino is best remembered for the role he created in The Godfather (and subsequently reprised in two sequels). While this is not his most demonstrative performance - indeed, he is exceptionally restrained - the quality of the script makes Michael Corleone notable.

Don Vito is a most complicated gangster. In his own words, he is not a killer, and he never mixes business with personal matters. He puts family first ("A man who doesn't spend time with his family can never be a real man") and despises displays of weakness. He understands the burden of power, and his wordless sympathy for Michael when he is forced to assume the "throne", is one of The Godfather's most revealing moments (about both father and son).

Family responsibility. A father's legacy. The need to earn respect. The corrupting influence of power. These are some of the ingredients combined in Francis Ford Coppola's cinematic blender. They are themes which have intrigued the greatest authors of every medium through the centuries.

Although the issues presented in The Godfather are universal in scope, the characters and setting are decidedly ethnic. Even to this day, there is an odd romanticism associated with New York's Italian crime families. The word "Mafia" conjures up images of the sinister and mysterious - scenes of the sort where Luca Brasi meets his fate. Francis Ford Coppola has tapped into this fascination and woven it as yet another element of the many that make his motion picture a compelling experience.

We come to The Godfather like Kay Adams - outsiders uncertain in our expectations - but it doesn't take long for us to be captivated by this intricate, violent world. The film can be viewed on many levels, with equal satisfaction awaiting those who just want a good story, and those who demand much more. The Godfather is long, yes - but it is one-hundred seventy minutes well-spent. When the closing credits roll, only a portion of the story has been told. Yet that last haunting image (Kay's shock of recognition), coupled with Nino Rota's mournful score, leaves a crater-like impression that The Godfather Part II only deepens.
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
10
HungryHippo123Apr 23, 2015
Just excellent film with great acting on definitely worth your time. Enjoyed from start to finish. It really shows the Italian Mafia. Great work went into this movie.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews