User Score
5.7

Mixed or average reviews- based on 51 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 27 out of 51
  2. Negative: 13 out of 51
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  1. ChadS.
    Aug 20, 2009
    4
    "The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard" is the sort of slack movie where the comic bits take precedence over the storyline. As a result, the characters have the substance of cardboard, but in this case, the cardboard is interesting because it's made of archetypes. Don Ready(Jeremy Piven) and his associates are badass used car salesmen for hire, who could only exist in the movie world. Put "The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard" is the sort of slack movie where the comic bits take precedence over the storyline. As a result, the characters have the substance of cardboard, but in this case, the cardboard is interesting because it's made of archetypes. Don Ready(Jeremy Piven) and his associates are badass used car salesmen for hire, who could only exist in the movie world. Put them on horses and the allusion to Westerns become more obvious. But still, a vestige of the cowboy survives, even in the modern trappings of an airplane, as Don lights up a cigarette like the Marlboro man. Don is a descendant of your classic Western hero; he has no place to call home; he's a wanderer. When Ben Selleck(James Brolin) summons Don and his possee into town, the car salesmen lodge at the Hacienda Courts(read: ranch), and hang out at the strip club(read: saloon). Instead of moving livestock, they move cars(the lot is the frontier). Ivy(Jordana Spiro), the boss' daughter(read: the sheriff's daughter), tames Don's wandering spirit when she chooses the outlaw over the gentleman(Ed Helms plays a "man"-band wanna-be), but in the postscript, the happy ending is undermined by the forces of filmic history: a wandering spirit can't be domesticated. They split up after two years. Primarily an absurdist comedy, "The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard" tries to be funny, then tries to be serious(an awkward transition since the people are cardboard), when it looks like Don isn't going to get the girl. John Wayne never said, "The only thing in this world I love is [horses]," but that's the idea Ethan Edwards seems to be expressing at the end of John Ford's "The Searchers". Don feels the same way about cars, and in the long run, he makes good on his declaration. Expand
  2. Feb 26, 2012
    6
    The movie made me laugh through most of it but with the cast and writers it had I really did expect more out of it. I was also kind of disappointed with the end of the movie. It's not as good as the Hangover but it is a funny movie and worth checking out.
  3. Nov 28, 2012
    5
    A few spare moments elevate this comedy into "at least remotely memorable" territory.
Metascore
39

Generally unfavorable reviews - based on 23 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 23
  2. Negative: 9 out of 23
  1. Reviewed by: Robert Abele
    70
    The Goods motors along choking out enough lowbrow laughs to make for an agreeably nutty late summer ride.
  2. A comedy without a shred of obvious filmmaking and an endless stream of good, bad, sometimes terrible, often absurd jokes.
  3. Reviewed by: Stan Hall
    67
    In many places it's genuinely, absurdly funny--crass, sleazy and morally questionable, yes, but still funny.