User Score
7.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 8 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 8
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 8
  3. Negative: 1 out of 8

Where To Watch

Stream On

Review this movie

  1. Your Score
    0 out of 10
    Rate this:
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
  1. Submit
  2. Check Spelling

User Reviews

  1. Oct 12, 2013
    6
    Two boys (Skylan Brooks & Ethan Dizon) are abandoned by their junkie ho mothers to fend for themselves on the rough side of Brooklyn. The story is relentlessly bleak and there are weak spots in the writing. That said, the performances of these two newcomers are sweet, touching and amazingly accomplished. The supporting cast includes some impressive names (Jennifer Hudson, Anthony Mackie)Two boys (Skylan Brooks & Ethan Dizon) are abandoned by their junkie ho mothers to fend for themselves on the rough side of Brooklyn. The story is relentlessly bleak and there are weak spots in the writing. That said, the performances of these two newcomers are sweet, touching and amazingly accomplished. The supporting cast includes some impressive names (Jennifer Hudson, Anthony Mackie) and director George Tillman Jr. manages to mine the drama without resorting to too much melo. While this film is dark and dismal, the pluck of this duo and the simple brilliance of the two actors is affecting. Expand
  2. Jan 22, 2015
    7
    Mister is a boy in his early teens with problems at school and bigger problems at home. He’s failed the school year and someone has written something rude about his mum in the boy’s toilet which won’t rub off. At home his mother Gloria is too strung out to keep enough food in the house and his annoying younger neighbour Pete is playing on his Playstation. Mister and Pete’s summer goesMister is a boy in his early teens with problems at school and bigger problems at home. He’s failed the school year and someone has written something rude about his mum in the boy’s toilet which won’t rub off. At home his mother Gloria is too strung out to keep enough food in the house and his annoying younger neighbour Pete is playing on his Playstation. Mister and Pete’s summer goes from rough to very bloody rough when Gloria is arrested during a raid on their tower block. Their summer holiday now consists of trying to scrape together enough food to survive and avoiding the police who will deliver them to child protection services and the dreaded Riverview boy’s home if they catch them.

    There are some very good performances to admire, not least from Skylan Brooks as Mister who shows an impressive range on his debut, alternating between angry resentment, vulnerability and desperation. The film works best in the scenes between Mister and Pete, finding glimmers of happiness amongst the grim realities of surviving the poverty and various villains that inhabit their world. At times the grimness of their situation and the range of baddies they have to contend with seem a bit heavy-handed, but the touches of wit and humanity balance it out and stop it from being dragged under by its own weight.

    There are a few mis-steps, but on the whole this is a success. Full of nicely observed details and performances – well worth a watch.

    Full review at ponderflix on wordpress.
    Expand
Metascore
61

Generally favorable reviews - based on 16 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 9 out of 16
  2. Negative: 0 out of 16
  1. Reviewed by: Charlie Schmidlin
    Oct 22, 2013
    50
    A wonderful document of inner-city oppression and two young actors' beginning steps, The Inevitable Defeat of Mister and Pete struggles to establish a cohesive center, and ultimately fumbles any tension on the path toward its title's possible fate.
  2. Reviewed by: Bill Stamets
    Oct 15, 2013
    63
    Stylistically, this saga of survival never aims for urban neo-realism. Yet, as sentimental humanism, it shows laudable taste in dodging the usual indulgent touches and turns when lost kids find their way.
  3. Reviewed by: Joe Neumaier
    Oct 11, 2013
    60
    Michael Starrbury’s astute script draws us in slowly, depicting the realities of Mister and Pete’s lives in progressive reveals.