The Intouchables

User Score
8.1

Universal acclaim- based on 324 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 25 out of 324

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User Reviews

  1. Jul 18, 2012
    5
    Ok, so I went into this movie not knowing anything about the actors, director, or story so that I could give the movie an unbiased review so YOU could make an educated decision about seeing this film: and here we go. This movie isn't without its charms, believe you me, it will have you giggling one moment and dead silent the next, but its just that. You'll share no huge laughs or be trulyOk, so I went into this movie not knowing anything about the actors, director, or story so that I could give the movie an unbiased review so YOU could make an educated decision about seeing this film: and here we go. This movie isn't without its charms, believe you me, it will have you giggling one moment and dead silent the next, but its just that. You'll share no huge laughs or be truly concerned for the main characters and the way their lives intertwine. Don't get me wrong, both lead actors play their roles very well, but not enough to draw you truly in to this brief slice of their lives. Some parts of this movie felt like they were thrown in just to fill time and serve no other purpose. I cant give this movie a higher review but it does have its audience: those who need to know their are people out there who have it just a little worse than you do. But you still might not come away with that. Expand
  2. Jan 11, 2013
    6
    Intouchables is a peculiar film, because is so different from what we have seen, speaking only about the way that the plot is developed, however the plot itself is not original. This picture treats topics such as humanity and feeling humanized. Philippe is a quadriplegic millionaire and everyone treats him like someone with a condition, until he meets Driss, a black man who had beenIntouchables is a peculiar film, because is so different from what we have seen, speaking only about the way that the plot is developed, however the plot itself is not original. This picture treats topics such as humanity and feeling humanized. Philippe is a quadriplegic millionaire and everyone treats him like someone with a condition, until he meets Driss, a black man who had been recently in jail. The thing that captivates the protagonist is that Driss forget about his condition and treats him as an equal; Philippe finally could feel like a real human being.
    Another interesting thing of the movie is the title Intouchables, referring to Philippe and Driss, because they both are marginalized from the society, the first one have a condition and the other is an ex-convict. All this can be notice in the relation that this both men have with their families. Ones go to the birthday of the millionaire just to see if he is still alive, and the others kicked out Driss from his home.
    Despite the film is very slowly, the humor is great and sophisticated. Plus a mix of classical-disco soundtrack, good direction and unexpected performances, highlighting the one of Omar Sy, this is a pleasant feature, not intouchable at all.
    Expand
  3. May 25, 2012
    6
    Shredding box office records in Europe, and shedding histrionics to tell a tale of dependence explored by an improbable friendship, 'Intouchables' confirms the enduring appetite filmgoers of all sorts can have for the simplest of stories; ones that aren't fake with bank-breaking void, but full with real shades of humanity. Directed by Eric Toledano and Olivier Nakache, the film revolvesShredding box office records in Europe, and shedding histrionics to tell a tale of dependence explored by an improbable friendship, 'Intouchables' confirms the enduring appetite filmgoers of all sorts can have for the simplest of stories; ones that aren't fake with bank-breaking void, but full with real shades of humanity. Directed by Eric Toledano and Olivier Nakache, the film revolves around two very different men, each looking for someone or something to mitigate their current situations; circumstances that are far from favorable. The first is a Senegalese immigrant named Driss (Omar Sy) who lives anyway he can. He resides in the crime-ridden projects outside Paris, France, where he commutes by foot, and is in the process of recovering from his stint in prison that's lasted six months. Looking to find a solid line of employment, one that will limit his time off the streets, Driss lands a job as a caregiver to an affluent quadriplegic Phillipe (Francois Cluzet). This premise provides the framework for the evolving relationship of two very different people, joined together by means of business. While the film does make certain of its "based on a true story" visage, it, in reality, is far more fictionalized than true (the real-life Driss, for example, was an Arab named Abdel). When asked why the filmmakers opted to make the casting change to include a black aide, they made the case they wanted Omar Sy. That's fine, he is more than qualified; he did beat out Jean Dujardin's role in "The Artist" for last years French Cesar Award. However, some of the scenes he's in, feel overly cliche, corny, and forced; think "Earth, Wind, and Fire." Moreover, as a whole, 'Intouchables' also contains a great many plot twists and character developments that seem to come from nowhere at unspecified times. Even more, and vexing of all, is the amount of exaggeration and lingering sense of insincerity that is never quite lifted from the film's intended "feel-good" aura; the film tries to offer something so absurdly inconceivable while not explaining how it all could be considered plausible. Instead, one is left to contemplate what might have been if the holey script would have placed more focus on developing the characters, and the situations that surround them. Notwithstanding its continuation of subterfuge, 'Intouchables' is held together by an earnest devotion to humanity, with its writers paying careful attention to delineating stability from adversity, and the persevering will by each man to accept the other, turning what would otherwise be constant cliche into an affecting camaraderie that is brought to form by Sy and Cluzet who possess a surprising chemistry to the screen. Further, while the copious subplots flirt with vapidity, often detailing personal despair, the film remains apt with the frequent gauging and testing of the men's representative comfort levels that the audience can see and feel teetertotter before their very eyes. Ultimately, 'Intouchables' liege disposition to value interpersonal affection over flattering dishonesty solidifies its connection with audience, and almost compensates for its few-too-many moments of self-inflicted abashment. It's the leads who salvage this lightly-intense European-pop-culture-phenomenon. Don't like it...you can blame the French. Expand
Metascore
57

Mixed or average reviews - based on 31 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 31
  2. Negative: 3 out of 31
  1. Reviewed by: Marc Savlov
    Jun 6, 2012
    67
    Take from the film's racial commingling what you want. Much of this may be old hat, even corny, and potentially offensive, but I haven't laughed out loud this often at a movie in ages.
  2. 70
    What it provides (instead of the thematically clever dialogue of typically subtle French comedy) is biting wit, poignancy and, forsaking some structural nuisances, the summer's best bromance.
  3. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Jun 1, 2012
    75
    It's the kind of movie that inspires word-of-mouth recommendations by speaking the international language of culture clash.