Weinstein Company, The | Release Date: November 26, 2010
8.4
USER SCORE
Universal acclaim based on 733 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
665
Mixed:
54
Negative:
14
WATCH NOW
Stream On
Stream On
Review this movie
VOTE NOW
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Check box if your review contains spoilers 0 characters (5000 max)
9
MarcDoyleNov 29, 2010
A wonderful story of friendship and how families operate. Colin Firth delivers another incredible performance, like he seemingly does every year. His relationships with his wife (Carter) and speech therapist (Rush) are so vivid an palpable,A wonderful story of friendship and how families operate. Colin Firth delivers another incredible performance, like he seemingly does every year. His relationships with his wife (Carter) and speech therapist (Rush) are so vivid an palpable, and I love how the very rich history is brought to life using their lens. It's also really interesting to get a glimpse into young Queen Elizabeth's life. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
9
ShiiraJan 5, 2011
The man in the top hat looks so doleful. He has the aspect of somebody who's just been handed down a death sentence by his physician. Crazy as this may sound, but if you were to propose a litany of hypotheticals toward the man in the top hat,The man in the top hat looks so doleful. He has the aspect of somebody who's just been handed down a death sentence by his physician. Crazy as this may sound, but if you were to propose a litany of hypotheticals toward the man in the top hat, he would probably choose cancer and an ordinary life, as he slowly approaches the mic. Unfortunately for him, appearances to the contrary, the doleful man is fit as a fiddle, and because of his birthright, slated to live a quotidian-free life, without his ever asking. After all, he's the Duke of York, and the words in those royal hands compose not a prescription for pills, but a keynote speech, one that would live in infamy, as the words would get stuck in his throat before a capacity crowd gathered at Wembley Stadum for the Empire Exhibition of 1932. Adding insult to injury, the duke's implosion is being broadcasted over the wireless, in which his oratorical impotence, no doubt, will make him a laughingstock all across the UK. No longer can he get away with remaining silent like his predecessors, stoic monarchs who lived during the age when simply being was enough. Stammering in the fog, the duke is literally turning green. Similar to Stanley Donen's "Singin' in the Rain", in which "The Jazz Singer" forced the conversion of "The Dueling Cavaliers" into a talkie, here too, the advent of sound changes the game the game for all the royal players consecrated around their means of subsistence. Much to the duke's great consternation, a speech impediment, thanks to the emerging technology, is now a matter of public record, and as a result, the future king's ability to "perform" his role, is put into question by his British subjects who are no longer mere subjects, but instead, comprise of an audience. His father, George V, suggests the basis behind the analogy between these two films, when he tells his younger son that the halcyon days of waving from moving carriages are over, in which the hand gesture, the simple execution of a purely unadulterated kinetic act, can no longer compete with the human voice. Like Norma Talmadge, the alleged inspiration behind Jean Hagen's character Lina Lamont, an idiosyncratic voice could have ended his career. Lucky for George V, god saved the republic by blessing him with an instrument that's positively stentorian. The outgoing king goes on to complain about having been transformed into an actor, and therefore, obligated to make a connection with his people. The king is wrong, of course, since radio or no radio, he already was a performer, a silent one. His success at mastering the new medium puts him in the same league as Greta Garbo and Marlene Dietrich, just to name a few. Verbal communication merely raises the stakes on the royal acting racket. Too bad for the duke that his job wasn't a simply a matter of hiring Debbie Reynolds to stand behind a camera have her read lines in-sync with his moving mouth. The sudden foregrounding of the voice over gesture put the future king on notice. Comparably speaking, soon after Al Jolson uttered the line, "You ain't heard nothing yet," not a peep was heard out of countless leading lights from the silent film era, most notably, Gloria Swanson, who played Norma Desmond in Billy Wilder's "Sunset Boulevard", the ultimate poison-pen letter to all things Hollywood. At Westminster Abbey, on the eve of his coronation, the duke brings up the unfortunate case of George the third, the king, who like the fictional siren, went mad, and as he relays his worries over being abdicated from the throne like his ancestor was to the Australian, the speech therapist Lionel Logue, the method to the unlicensed doctor's madness comes into sharp focus. Perceived to be anti-establishment, due to the quack's insistence that he be considered an equal of the duke's throughout their sessions, "The King's Speech", with its echoes of the anarchy-minded "Queen(The)", diverges from the Stephen Frears film with an agenda that belies the outward appearance of irreverence towards the crown. Largely because the speech therapist takes the liberty of using the duke's informal name, likewise, the audience, being privy to Birdie's Achilles Heel, considers themselves to be the king's equal, as well, implicated as such through the shared experience of public speaking, a bane to many, which unites the rich and famous with the anonymous. As Birdie frets over his public image and public opinion, Lionel stealthily seizes and occupies St. Edward's chair; we're there too, represented by the names carved into the wood, but then Lionel, speaking for himself, and on behalf of us(the metaphoric interlopers who crashed the seat), incites the king to kick out the Aussie and the transplanted moviegoer out of his rightful place on the coronation chair. In effect, the audience participates in their own marginalization, as they cheer on Birdie's self-realization that he's better than the common man. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
All this user's reviews
8
MatteoJan 13, 2011
C'mon people. You're just so happy with this movie because there's hardly any good movies this year. There is nothing surprising in this movie. You know the whole story and what's gonna happen from the trailer. Firth should win the oscar, butC'mon people. You're just so happy with this movie because there's hardly any good movies this year. There is nothing surprising in this movie. You know the whole story and what's gonna happen from the trailer. Firth should win the oscar, but the movie is predictable and waisted five subplots that could of made the way too obviously predictable ending more powerful. Every character is one-note besides the two main characters. A nice hbo film. But not a great film worth winning Oscars or Golden Globes. Definitely an Emmy. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
9
ERG1008Feb 21, 2011
Duke of York, has stammer & speech problems, goes to unconventional therapist, King/Father dies, Brother abdicates, made King, has to overcome disability.
Wonderful film which is moving, warm & funny with superb performances from both Colin
Duke of York, has stammer & speech problems, goes to unconventional therapist, King/Father dies, Brother abdicates, made King, has to overcome disability.
Wonderful film which is moving, warm & funny with superb performances from both Colin Firth & Geoffrey Rush.
Authenticity & casting are spot on with good support from Helena Bonham Carter & Guy Pearce although wasn't too convinced by Timothy Spall's Churchill.
Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
All this user's reviews
8
jeremypDec 28, 2010
If you loved â
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
9
LynJan 4, 2011
Colin Firth is just as amazing as you've heard. And like a juicy book about historical figures, this film will make you want to find out more about these characters with whom (unless you're a real Anglophile) you might not have been veryColin Firth is just as amazing as you've heard. And like a juicy book about historical figures, this film will make you want to find out more about these characters with whom (unless you're a real Anglophile) you might not have been very familiar. In my opinion, not quite as good as "The Queen," however. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
7
moviefanJul 10, 2011
Yes, the acting was great and deserving of an oscar, the story was not. This was a fine movie if you are not looking for any real climax and enjoy a very slow pace, this film is an intricate look at an individual's struggle with publicYes, the acting was great and deserving of an oscar, the story was not. This was a fine movie if you are not looking for any real climax and enjoy a very slow pace, this film is an intricate look at an individual's struggle with public speaking. There are no real highs or lows, nothing that is particularly dramatic and therefore was relatively flat, the acting was excellent and there was just enough of a script to keep you watching without losing interest. If going to movies is about entertainment and walking out ot the theater feeling like you had seen a memorable film this is not one of those. I could never see myself watching this movie again, this does not mean that it was bad, just that it was your typical "Picture of the Year". Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
All this user's reviews
10
txrangersfan72Jan 21, 2011
I don't get to see movies like this too often. While the pacing was slow in parts, I felt like it was intentional due to the need to have the viewer "feel" King George VI's own slow pace. Otherwise, the acting, script, locations and emotionI don't get to see movies like this too often. While the pacing was slow in parts, I felt like it was intentional due to the need to have the viewer "feel" King George VI's own slow pace. Otherwise, the acting, script, locations and emotion were flawless. The effort made by the recently-defunct UK Film Council to get this picture made and distributed was Herculean. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
10
bhavertyFeb 2, 2011
This film is enjoyable from beginning to end, which is all the more amazing when you realise that the plot could basically be summarised in a single sentence. The performances are all riveting and I can attest that the stories of spontaneousThis film is enjoyable from beginning to end, which is all the more amazing when you realise that the plot could basically be summarised in a single sentence. The performances are all riveting and I can attest that the stories of spontaneous ovations in theatres all over are backed by my experience here in Sydney. If The King's Speech is beaten by any picture (especially the extremely overrated Black Swan) at the Oscars, I will be very disappointed. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
10
RyanGeeDec 27, 2010
Let me say this in a simple statement: Tom Hooper's The King's Speech is in my opinion the best film of 2010. Director Tom Hooper's (known for John Adams) The King's Speech is a British period piece depicting the speech impediment of KingLet me say this in a simple statement: Tom Hooper's The King's Speech is in my opinion the best film of 2010. Director Tom Hooper's (known for John Adams) The King's Speech is a British period piece depicting the speech impediment of King George IV (Coling Firth). After the death of his father and the scandalous resignation of his brother King Edward VIII, George is abruptly given the royal position. Taking on the country on the brink of World War II, the King, with the help of speech therapist Lionel Lugue (Geoffrey Rush), must overcome his stammer to address a country ready for battle. Let's start with script, The King's Speech is a light-hearted and passionate approach to a small aspect in one of the most major events in history (I am of course referring to World War II). The film's dialogue masterfully combines elements of wit with serious dialogue. The use of Rush as comic relief provides a nice balance between the otherwise grim deterioration of Britain's parliament and the protagonist's struggle to find success. The King's Speech succeeds in combining more than an one-dimensional emotion. Performance-wise, Colin Firth steals the show. Coming from his nomination in A Single Man, Firth returns with an Oscar in mind. Firth plays his role as George VI with apparent repressed emotion and humor that still maintains the character's dignity. Geoffrey Rush, who plays George's speech therapist, and Helena Bolena Carter, the future Queen Mother, respectively deserve a nomination for their support of Firth's character. What makes The King's Speech my "best film of 2010," does not solely lay in its mechanics unlike The Social Network. Rather, the film blends great film making with a story full of inspiration with no cliche present. Firth's character is a character that most will sympathize as we can all see ourselves in King George VI's personal struggle. Although somewhat predictable, The King's Speech will grab you, inspire you, and uplift your soul. Expand
0 of 3 users found this helpful03
All this user's reviews
10
brewcrewprideDec 18, 2010
It isnt very often that a crowd pleasing film and a work of art go hand and hand but led by performances that are sure to be nominated for Academy Awards, "The King's Speech" is delightful and is a wonderful film to see for the holidays.
0 of 3 users found this helpful03
All this user's reviews
10
emkadvJan 14, 2011
Those who say that there are few if any surprises in this film are correct. Nonetheless, the dialog and the performances are so good, that I consider this one of the two best films I've seen this year. (The other is The Social Network.) TheThose who say that there are few if any surprises in this film are correct. Nonetheless, the dialog and the performances are so good, that I consider this one of the two best films I've seen this year. (The other is The Social Network.) The audience spontaneously broke into well-deserved applause at the end of the film. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
10
BikerjamesDec 30, 2010
After seeing the boring "Tron" and "Narnia" films, I was in the mood for a movie with some real acting in it. I loved this film. I knew that Firth and Rush would be great together, but I was taken by surprise by the cinematography as well.After seeing the boring "Tron" and "Narnia" films, I was in the mood for a movie with some real acting in it. I loved this film. I knew that Firth and Rush would be great together, but I was taken by surprise by the cinematography as well. It was fun being inside the castles and palaces. Colin Firth is really on a roll lately, Geoffrey Rush is amazing as always, and the supporting cast is as good as it gets. Highly recommended. Expand
0 of 3 users found this helpful03
All this user's reviews
10
Kaizoku2793Feb 16, 2011
One of the best movies of the year second only to Social Network. The King's Speech is about a king overcoming his stutterâ
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
9
rdaviesJan 29, 2011
As far as film's about speech impediments go, you can't go wrong with this. The banter is top notch. Firth and Rush are amazing together and the film keeps tempo.
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
8
scrieciuJan 28, 2011
What can I say, an Oscar worthy thanks to the performance from Colin Firth, great acting, well directed and an amazing true story. Usually, I hate movies about politics, but I gotta say, this one manage me to keep me entertained. I never sawWhat can I say, an Oscar worthy thanks to the performance from Colin Firth, great acting, well directed and an amazing true story. Usually, I hate movies about politics, but I gotta say, this one manage me to keep me entertained. I never saw a movie with so much emotions from the actors. Geoffrey Rush and Helena Bonham Carter delivered a great performance as well. The main reason that I liked this movie it's because I really got involved in the story. When was the last time that you were deeply involved in a movie ? In this case, '' The King's Speech '' is one of them. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
10
Bama72Feb 7, 2011
Absolutely wonderful. Brilliant acting all around and brilliant directing. It is so nice to see a movie that doesn't have bloodshed, special effects all over the place, gratuitous sex, just a great story and great acting.
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
All this user's reviews
10
RumblebeeloveJan 22, 2011
An amazing and well put together movie. Rush and Firth lead the helm with their superb skills, but so many others did so well in this film(Carter and Spall!). The cinematography and overall look of the film is exceptional. There is realAn amazing and well put together movie. Rush and Firth lead the helm with their superb skills, but so many others did so well in this film(Carter and Spall!). The cinematography and overall look of the film is exceptional. There is real tension and emotion here. It's a great work, in practically all aspects, but this film is not for everyone since it is devoid of much physical action, but if you can overlook that is might be the film of the year. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
10
BritinLANov 28, 2010
Great film. Beautifully written, acted and directed. Colin Firth did an amazing job and I couldn't agree more that he deserves a Best Actor nom and Rush a Best Supporting nom. I highly recommend seeing this film or you'll regret it come next March.
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
10
OscarPicks2010Dec 28, 2010
The King's Speech is visual stunning with it's fantastic cinematography, dramatic performances from the cast, and it's perfect pacing. The story set back in the early 1930s when World War II was beginning. King George V was serious ill andThe King's Speech is visual stunning with it's fantastic cinematography, dramatic performances from the cast, and it's perfect pacing. The story set back in the early 1930s when World War II was beginning. King George V was serious ill and when he died, he gave the throne to his oldest son. Unfortunately, George's oldest son was dethroned by the Parliment and gave the spot to the next oldest son, (Berty, Colin Firth). Berty became King George VI and carrying on his shoulder the weight of going to war. Giving a wartime speech is clearly very important at the time but it was proven very difficult since Berty had a stammering problem ever since he was little. His wife, Elizabeth, seeked help from a "speech therapist", Lionel (Geoffrey Rush). Although he was helping the king of England, Lionel treats Berty as if he was a normal guy. Earning trust throughout the months from the king, Geoffrey was able to help the king give a decent speech. Predictable, but there wasn't supposed to be any surprises. Colin Firth is perhaps the only actor in Hollywood who can stammer his lines as good as he was in this film. But stammering and pausing in between words isn't going to cut it. Giving an emotional yet humorous performance, Colin Firth has guaranteed himself a spot in this year's Academy Awards. Firth isn't the only one who stood out. His companions Helena Bohem Carter and Geoffrey Rush is probably the best choice for the roles they played. Playing the king's wife and had very little lines, Helena Bohen Carter is still eligible for her second Oscar nomination which she will earn. Geoffrey Rush as a teacher isn't the best idea, but seeing him on screen is gripping in every which way. David Seidler delivered a very top-class script that points towards the Oscars in every direction. Making Colin Firth pausing in between everything he says and Geoffrey Rush's smooth language, Seidler is about to earn himself a first Oscar nomination.
Tom Hooper directed this without holding back proving himself to be one of the better directors in Hollywood. Making an R-rated film only because of a few F-words shows that he was willing to make the film for what it is, not to get a larger audience. With great knowledge on the era and fantastic style, Tom Hooper is the guy to watch out for.
Solidly written, beautifully cinematographed, elegantly directed, and perfectly acted, The King's Speech might be the Best Picture contender to look out for (The Social Network).
OscarBuzz: A lot but here are the major, Best Picture (might win), Best Director (good chance), Best Actor (Colin Firth, might win), Best Supporting Actress (good chance), Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush, might win), Best Screenplay (good chance) I thought The Social Network was going to definitely win the Best Picture, but after seeing this, I don't know who's going to win anymore. But it is definitely going down to The King's Speech and The Social Network.
Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
10
penders627Dec 3, 2010
Nice conversation. I like it so much.Its really A wonderful story of friendship and how families operate.Really very nice.I have no words to describe it.
0 of 3 users found this helpful03
All this user's reviews
10
calabash5Dec 8, 2010
The definitive scene for me is when Bertie breaks down and cries. I can't help but compare it to Firth's brilliant dissolving into tears as George in A Single Man.
Firth didn't pull out just another crying scene from his bag of acting
The definitive scene for me is when Bertie breaks down and cries. I can't help but compare it to Firth's brilliant dissolving into tears as George in A Single Man.
Firth didn't pull out just another crying scene from his bag of acting scenes.
He's brilliant, Rush's brilliant, HBC perfect.
Lovely script. Beautiful film that pulls the watcher into the life of Bertie. What he sees. What he feels.
Brilliant all 'roud.
Expand
0 of 3 users found this helpful03
All this user's reviews
8
stuartDec 15, 2010
If anyone believes this is a "glimpse into young Queen Elizabeth's life" I have a bridge to sell you. This is just a very well-acted movie with undertones of positive propaganda for an elite group who self-named themselves royalty, king,If anyone believes this is a "glimpse into young Queen Elizabeth's life" I have a bridge to sell you. This is just a very well-acted movie with undertones of positive propaganda for an elite group who self-named themselves royalty, king, queen, prince, etc. (If they don't keep up the myth of their specialness who will?! We might remember how the family got rich in the first place: two hundred years of stealing and murder). This movie is a superb piece of cinema nonetheless. It reaches depths of emotion and highs of the best acting seldom seen on the big screen. This is a must see movie. Expand
0 of 3 users found this helpful03
All this user's reviews
8
krum080Dec 22, 2010
Rush and Firth's performances held this rather long movie together. Fantastic costumes, scenery, dialogue and cinematography took this from a historical film to 2 hours of fun. Rush deserves at LEAST the golden globe.
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
8
FDT44Mar 12, 2011
What impels "The King's Speech" is its facility to delineate a punctual biopic without losing its charm and charisma that shimmers, and speaks to the engrossing ardor that encapsulates internal struggle. The painstaking desire to squelch ourWhat impels "The King's Speech" is its facility to delineate a punctual biopic without losing its charm and charisma that shimmers, and speaks to the engrossing ardor that encapsulates internal struggle. The painstaking desire to squelch our visceral "stammers" is felt deep within; plaudits of praise is well-deserved. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
All this user's reviews
8
savagesophiaDec 22, 2010
While it may not be the Oscar-perfect film they are touting it to be, it's pretty damn close. Firth and Rush are reason enough to make the film a must-see, but the added bonus of a superb supporting cast, divine sets and cinematography andWhile it may not be the Oscar-perfect film they are touting it to be, it's pretty damn close. Firth and Rush are reason enough to make the film a must-see, but the added bonus of a superb supporting cast, divine sets and cinematography and the best use of swearwords I've ever seen/heart make it a classic. The closing frames of the film did take away from the experience as a whole - A very intimate portrait exposed and pretending to be something it's not. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
10
Genghis_SeanDec 26, 2010
Truly a remarkable movie given that the entire story could be told in a sentence or two, and it's largely predictable. Wonderful, wonderful movie that elicited spontaneous applause from the theater at its conclusion.
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
8
DKayJan 5, 2011
Definitely a solid film, but is so because of the individual performances and the relationship between Firth and Rush. Not sure if the film itself will have a lasting impact, but I know Firth's character will, as was with his coming out partyDefinitely a solid film, but is so because of the individual performances and the relationship between Firth and Rush. Not sure if the film itself will have a lasting impact, but I know Firth's character will, as was with his coming out party in A Single Man... Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
8
kormac66Dec 31, 2010
Solid all around. Firth is strong and Rush delivers a perf that might win a best supporting oscar in any other year, but not with Bale's turn as dicky ecklund. Too many facial close-ups marred this film for me a bit, yeah, we get it, he'sSolid all around. Firth is strong and Rush delivers a perf that might win a best supporting oscar in any other year, but not with Bale's turn as dicky ecklund. Too many facial close-ups marred this film for me a bit, yeah, we get it, he's struggling with his stammer. But overall, very professional film. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews
9
Bec215Jan 4, 2011
I'm glad, in the end, that this movie took so long to bring to the screen (the Queen Mother asked it not be made until after her death) because this movie belongs to Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush. Firth has a rare gravitas and elegance toI'm glad, in the end, that this movie took so long to bring to the screen (the Queen Mother asked it not be made until after her death) because this movie belongs to Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush. Firth has a rare gravitas and elegance to play a royal like few actors alive, and Rush keeps his character slightly off-kilter, without ever slipping into camp or silliness. Bonham-Carter is genius as the Queen Mum - a woman who in life was far from the (figuratively) sterile royal cliche... I like to think of her as a proto-Diana. The movie benefits from the relatively spare set decoration - it would have been so easy to go the usual path and turn the decor into another character... but keeping it wisely in the background, the trio are kept front-and-center, as they should be in a character-driven movie.

You don't have to be a 'film' fan to love this movie. Everyone cheers for an underdog. In sum, this movie lives up to the hype, and coming on the heels of A Single Man and a resume to die for, should firmly cement Firth as one of, if not the, finest actor of his generation.
Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
All this user's reviews