Fox Searchlight Pictures | Release Date: September 27, 2006
8.1
USER SCORE
Universal acclaim based on 145 Ratings
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Positive:
121
Mixed:
20
Negative:
4
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StephanieS.Mar 19, 2007
While Idi Amen degraded to the status of Dictator and maniacal murderer, this movie did little to establish the foundation for his rise to power. Many historically infamous individuals begin humbly and rise to rule, based upon their accurate While Idi Amen degraded to the status of Dictator and maniacal murderer, this movie did little to establish the foundation for his rise to power. Many historically infamous individuals begin humbly and rise to rule, based upon their accurate sense of what their people desire. Idi Amen was such a person. He was a 9-time heavyweight boxing champion and sargeant in the British military, who won the support and sponsorship of the British leadership. Being an African, one can easily conclude that this support was based, to some degree, on an enormous charisma and aptitude. While his political career was rife with abuse and tyrrany, it would have been appropriate to show some of the character he had to exhibit in order to command such broad based support, both from his own people, as well as the British government. Instead, the movie brings us into the latter years of an administration and personality gone off track and tending towards the manic. This may well be true, but no dictator has ruled that has not first been given permission. In addition, the rise of the young Scottish docctor seems utterly inappropriate, given Idi Amen's proven ability to win the favor of nations and people. A person of his considerable and terrible ability would not have been as easily trusting as the Idi Amen characterized in the film. Quite honestly, he had too much personal capital at stake to entrust it to someone with so little wit or wisdom. It is believed his true mentor was a member of the British Secret Service...this makes sense. Finally, the films portrayal of the African woman was utterly disgusting. I absolutely do not believe that women oppressed as they are by their muslim traditions and/or tribal rituals, would be so easily bedded. If this is the case for the average African woman, how much more applicable to the wife of the President, a dictator, a murderer. For if she did not fear him for her own life, she would have certainly feared him for the life of her son. There is no way any reasonable mother would enter so lightly into a situation that had such daunting implications. That this film would ask us to accept such a scenario is a disgrace to every mother of African decent, down to Margaret Garner, who attempted to kill her own children vs. see them sold into slavery. This portryal is a betrayal of the truth. I am disappointed that in 2007, we still have little tolerance for the truth regarding people of color. We are not beasts with passions like unto animals in heat or enraged, but a complex, human creation...sometimes touching the heavens and othertimes at the very gates of hell, but nonetheless human like unto all. Expand
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3
JustinA.Oct 15, 2006
If you are actually interested in 1970's Uganda, an infinitely better movie to watch is General Idi Amin Dada, a documentary by Barbet Schroeder. My problem with The Last King of Scotland is not so much having a white protagonist, nor If you are actually interested in 1970's Uganda, an infinitely better movie to watch is General Idi Amin Dada, a documentary by Barbet Schroeder. My problem with The Last King of Scotland is not so much having a white protagonist, nor making that protagonist privy, Zelig-like, to every major event during Amin's rule. Rather, its creating a fictitious figure at all, especially one, who, according to the narrative, played such a significant role in the narrated events. Really, see Schroeder's film and see Amin himself. He's much more gripping (and strange and terrifying) than Forrest Whitaker. Expand
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