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Mixed or average reviews - based on 15 Critics What's this?

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  • Starring: , , ,
  • Summary: With Sweden caught between Nazi Germany and Stalin’s Russia, the country’s elites chose a policy of neutrality and compliance, with few daring to speak up against the evil around them. Among those who did, nobody was as loud and as uncompromising as Segerstedt (Jesper Christensen), a leading Swedish journalist of the 20th century. In the eyes of many of his countrymen, his pen was far more dangerous to Sweden than the Nazi sword. Amidst the political turmoil of the times, Segerstedt’s own personal life took a dramatic and scandalous turn as he entered into a very public affair with Maja Forssman, the Jewish wife of his close friend, the newspaper’s publisher. [Music Box Films] Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 15
  2. Negative: 0 out of 15
  1. Reviewed by: Glenn Kenny
    Jun 20, 2014
    88
    A remarkably full-bodied and frank character study that illuminates the old saw about the political being personal in a genuinely unusual way.
  2. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Jun 20, 2014
    83
    It’s a big movie, but in an emotional, not a historical, sense. Oftentimes it has the hushness of a chamber drama even when the world is its stage.
  3. Reviewed by: Kenneth Turan
    Jun 19, 2014
    80
    Measured and beautifully modulated, the 82-year-old director has the kind of sureness and fluidity that is easy to underestimate. But it's difficult not to be impressed by the results.
  4. Reviewed by: David Lee Dallas
    Jun 16, 2014
    63
    Though ambitiously busy, the film is also self-sabotaging and stagnant, showcasing its main character's struggles without interpreting them into a cohesive thesis.
  5. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Jun 19, 2014
    60
    I can't recommend it without reservation, but it's a must-see for those who have followed Mr. Troell's career, and a should-see for those who can look past its oddities to its cumulative power.
  6. Reviewed by: Sam Fragoso
    Jun 19, 2014
    60
    Troell’s portrait, driven by a desire to excavate the truth, is a refreshing respite from artificial biopics.
  7. Reviewed by: Calum Marsh
    Jun 17, 2014
    50
    This attention to the personal crises of Segerstedt comes at the expense of a broader and more elusive subject, namely, the war. We know what Segerstedt did, and Troell tries to ask why. What he ignores are the implications.

See all 15 Critic Reviews