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9.0

Universal acclaim- based on 1442 Ratings

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  1. May 6, 2015
    9
    To say that fantasy movies have not been a big draw at the box office is to understate the matter. A lot of this has had to do with the poor quality of the product. Consider the evidence: titles like Willow, Dragonheart, and Dungeons and Dragons. Finally, 2001 has seen the belated emergence of fantasy as a legitimate cinematic genre. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone was one of theTo say that fantasy movies have not been a big draw at the box office is to understate the matter. A lot of this has had to do with the poor quality of the product. Consider the evidence: titles like Willow, Dragonheart, and Dungeons and Dragons. Finally, 2001 has seen the belated emergence of fantasy as a legitimate cinematic genre. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone was one of the year's most anticipated releases and, by the end of December, it will be one of the top money-makers of the past 12 months. Now, along comes The Lord of the Rings, as anticipated for 30-50 year olds and Harry Potter was for their children.

    As entertaining as Harry Potter may be, it cannot hold a candle to The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. With this production, Jackson has used The Lord of the Rings to re-invent fantasy for the cinema in the same way that the novel provided the blueprint for the written word. This astounding movie accomplishes what no other fantasy film has been able to do: transport viewers to an entirely different reality, immerse them in it, and maroon them there for nearly three hours. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring brings Middle Earth to glorious life. From the first moment of the first reel, I was there.

    First and foremost, The Lord of the Rings is an adventure, and, in that, it is relentlessly successful. One does not need to have read the books to appreciate the movie. The background is explained concisely in a voiceover prologue, and the action proceeds in a straightforward manner. As long as one enjoys a well-crafted adventure yarn set against the backdrop of a mythical clash between good and evil, The Lord of the Rings will satisfy. Like all great movies of this sort, this one is characterized by tremendous action scenes punctuated by moments of rest and reflection. So, we have the flight from the Shire, followed by the council at Rivendell, followed by the hazardous trek through Moria (the movie's high point), followed by the encounter with Galadriel, followed by the sundering of the fellowship. Along the way, there is triumph, sorrow, and a little philosophical depth. The Lord of the Rings emphasizes two themes: the importance of brotherhood and the need for true strength to come from within.

    In crafting his vision of Middle Earth, Jackson has employed all of the tricks available to him: miniatures, deceptive camera angles, location shooting, impressive set design, and matte paintings. He has also made use of computer graphics, but not to the extent that another director might have. Thus, The Lord of the Rings has a less artificial appearance than might have been the case if Jackson had relied too heavily on CGI technology. Andrew Lesnie's camerawork has the grand scope expected in an epic motion picture, and Howard Shore's score, which is at times heroic and at times thoughtful, compliments the visuals without ever calling attention to itself.

    The Lord of the Rings is not an actors' movie, but each member of the cast acquits himself or herself well. Of special note are Ian McKellan, who presents Gandalf as a vulnerable and sympathetic figure; Ian Holm, whose Bilbo Baggins is a weary and tortured individual; and Elijah Wood, who shows the gradual changes in Frodo as he is transformed from a carefree hobbit to the person upon whom the fate of the world rests. Some recognizable names fill small roles - Liv Tyler is surprisingly good as Arwen; Cate Blanchett is cool and regal as Galadriel; and Christopher Lee brings his chilling presence to the part of the treacherous, traitorous Sauruman.

    The strength of Jackson's vision as depicted in The Fellowship of the Ring gives movie-goers cause to hope that we may be in the midst of a cinematic achievement. If The Two Towers and The Return of the King live up to the standard set by this film, The Lord of the Rings will become a milestone not only for its genre, but for motion pictures in general. But, regardless of what the future brings, the single movie we now have before us stands out as one of the most rousing examples of entertainment to reach multiplexes in a long time. At last, someone has figured out how to do an epic fantasy justice on the big screen.
    Expand
  2. Apr 23, 2015
    9
    In the pantheon of fantasy writers, no diety is treated with greater reverence than J.R.R. Tolkien, who is regarded by most readers as the Father of Modern Fantasy. During the past three decades, the fantasy area in bookstores has expanded from a minor subsection of science fiction to a major category in its own right. A couple dozen titles have been replaced by hundreds. Fantasy has goneIn the pantheon of fantasy writers, no diety is treated with greater reverence than J.R.R. Tolkien, who is regarded by most readers as the Father of Modern Fantasy. During the past three decades, the fantasy area in bookstores has expanded from a minor subsection of science fiction to a major category in its own right. A couple dozen titles have been replaced by hundreds. Fantasy has gone from being a cult genre to entering the mainstream. This would not have happened without the popularity and influence of Tolkien's The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. Nearly every published fantasy author acknowledges having read and been inspired by Tolkien's canon, and, while The Lord of the Rings may not be the longest or most complex fantasy series to date, it remains the standard against which all similar works are measured. It is the epic fantasy series.

    To say that fantasy movies have not been a big draw at the box office is to understate the matter. A lot of this has had to do with the poor quality of the product. Consider the evidence: titles like Willow, Dragonheart, and Dungeons and Dragons. Finally, 2001 has seen the belated emergence of fantasy as a legitimate cinematic genre. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone was one of the year's most anticipated releases and, by the end of December, it will be one of the top money-makers of the past 12 months. Now, along comes The Lord of the Rings, as anticipated for 30-50 year olds and Harry Potter was for their children.

    As entertaining as Harry Potter may be, it cannot hold a candle to The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. With this production, Jackson has used The Lord of the Rings to re-invent fantasy for the cinema in the same way that the novel provided the blueprint for the written word. This astounding movie accomplishes what no other fantasy film has been able to do: transport viewers to an entirely different reality, immerse them in it, and maroon them there for nearly three hours. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring brings Middle Earth to glorious life. From the first moment of the first reel, I was there.

    In crafting his vision of Middle Earth, Jackson has employed all of the tricks available to him: miniatures, deceptive camera angles, location shooting, impressive set design, and matte paintings. He has also made use of computer graphics, but not to the extent that another director might have. Thus, The Lord of the Rings has a less artificial appearance than might have been the case if Jackson had relied too heavily on CGI technology. Andrew Lesnie's camerawork has the grand scope expected in an epic motion picture, and Howard Shore's score, which is at times heroic and at times thoughtful, compliments the visuals without ever calling attention to itself.

    The Lord of the Rings is not an actors' movie, but each member of the cast acquits himself or herself well. Of special note are Ian McKellan, who presents Gandalf as a vulnerable and sympathetic figure; Ian Holm, whose Bilbo Baggins is a weary and tortured individual; and Elijah Wood, who shows the gradual changes in Frodo as he is transformed from a carefree hobbit to the person upon whom the fate of the world rests. Some recognizable names fill small roles - Liv Tyler is surprisingly good as Arwen; Cate Blanchett is cool and regal as Galadriel; and Christopher Lee brings his chilling presence to the part of the treacherous, traitorous Sauruman.

    The strength of Jackson's vision as depicted in The Fellowship of the Ring gives movie-goers cause to hope that we may be in the midst of a cinematic achievement. If The Two Towers and The Return of the King live up to the standard set by this film, The Lord of the Rings will become a milestone not only for its genre, but for motion pictures in general. But, regardless of what the future brings, the single movie we now have before us stands out as one of the most rousing examples of entertainment to reach multiplexes in a long time. At last, someone has figured out how to do an epic fantasy justice on the big screen.
    Expand
  3. Apr 19, 2015
    9
    Passed to him by his uncle Bilbo, young Hobbit Frodo Baggins becomes the unlikely and unwilling bearer of The One Ring of power, an instrument of unparalleled evil. And so Frodo, along with his three Hobbit chums, the wizard Gandalf and a swordsman named Strider, set out on an epic quest.

    Fellowship is indeed merely an opening salvo, and even after three hours in the dark you will
    Passed to him by his uncle Bilbo, young Hobbit Frodo Baggins becomes the unlikely and unwilling bearer of The One Ring of power, an instrument of unparalleled evil. And so Frodo, along with his three Hobbit chums, the wizard Gandalf and a swordsman named Strider, set out on an epic quest.

    Fellowship is indeed merely an opening salvo, and even after three hours in the dark you will likely exit the cinema ravenous with anticipation for the further two parts of the trilogy. Fellowship is also unabashedly rooted in the fantasy genre. Not to be confused with the techno-cool of good science fiction, nor even the cutesy charm of family fare like Harry Potter, the territory of Tolkien is clearly marked by goo and goblins and **** Persons with an aversion to lines such as, “To the bridge of Khazad-dûm!” are as well to stay within the Shire-like comforts of home (their loss).

    utting formula blockbusters to shame, Fellowship is impeccably cast and constructed with both care and passion: this is a labour of love that never feels laboured. Emotional range and character depth ultimately take us beyond genre limitations, and it deserves to play as wide as a certain Mr. Potter.
    Expand
  4. Apr 19, 2015
    10
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Brooking no argument, history should quickly regard Peter Jackson’s The Fellowship Of The Ring as the first instalment of the best fantasy epic in motion picture history. This statement is worthy of investigation for several reasons.

    Fellowship is indeed merely an opening salvo, and even after three hours in the dark you will likely exit the cinema ravenous with anticipation for the further two parts of the trilogy. Fellowship is also unabashedly rooted in the fantasy genre. Not to be confused with the techno-cool of good science fiction, nor even the cutesy charm of family fare like Harry Potter, the territory of Tolkien is clearly marked by goo and goblins and **** Persons with an aversion to lines such as, “To the bridge of Khazad-dûm!” are as well to stay within the Shire-like comforts of home (their loss).

    With those caveats in place, it bears repeating: fantasy does not come finer. There are electrifying moments — notably the computer-assisted swooping camera through Isengard as it transforms into a factory for evil — when Jackson’s flight of fancy approaches the sublime as the romantic poets would understand it: inspiring awe.

    Leaving aside the thorny issue of Tolkien die-hards and their inevitable gripes — “What no Tom Bombadil?” — Jackson’s screenplay (written in collaboration with Fran Walsh and Phillipa Boyens) is both bolder and more judicious than Steven Kloves’ surprisingly timid retread of Harry Potter. In particular, rescuing the romance of Arwen and Aragorn from the footnotes and the elevation of Saruman to all-action bad guy actually has a corrective influence on Tolkien’s often oblique and female-sparse source material.

    There are problems, though. The three-hour running time is high on incident and low on discernible form. After successive detours to Elf habitats Rivendell (the watery home of Elrond) and Lothlórien (the forest home of the Lady Galadriel), the uninitiated might well ask why these crazy Elf kids can’t just live together and spare us all this attenuated dramatic structure.

    More importantly, the action clearly climaxes in the desperate flight from the Mines Of Moria, where the largely seamless SFX is showcased in the best possible light — total darkness — but the narrative demands a different, downbeat ending. Indeed, but for some fine emotional playing from Bean, Mortensen, Astin and Wood, the final fight might feel like a particularly brutal game of paintball in Bluebell Wood. But then, the real battles are yet to come...

    Putting formula blockbusters to shame, Fellowship is impeccably cast and constructed with both care and passion: this is a labour of love that never feels laboured. Emotional range and character depth ultimately take us beyond genre limitations, and it deserves to play as wide as a certain Mr. Potter.
    Expand
  5. Mar 22, 2015
    6
    1. choppy editing in non action scenes.
    2. way to slow character development.
    3. to much screen time devoted to unneeded scenery brochure.
    4. not enough focus on Languages
    5. nazgul impotence.
    6. no magic battles.
  6. Mar 13, 2015
    10
    The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowhip of the Ring bring me to a new world. This movie is so damn beautiful with the awesome soundtrack. I really have no idea about this
  7. Mar 11, 2015
    10
    Honestly the one of the most incredible movies I have ever seen, and the fact that it was made 14 years ago makes it even more spectacular. Amazing acting, amazing characters, amazing scenery, amazing actions, amazing story, amazing everything!
  8. Mar 6, 2015
    10
    an epic movie although the first half are pretty damn boring and the second one i just saying " awesome". in began you will see how beautiful this film. very recommend film if you have so many times :D
  9. Jan 26, 2015
    9
    Half of The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is lighthearted, and the other half is a dark, mature, fantasy tale. Either way though, Fellowship is a thoroughly enjoyable fantasy romp filled with fun, lovable characters, fantastic acting, a captivating story, truly pulse-pounding action sequences, and a surprising emotional impact. This film set the stage perfectly for its twoHalf of The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is lighthearted, and the other half is a dark, mature, fantasy tale. Either way though, Fellowship is a thoroughly enjoyable fantasy romp filled with fun, lovable characters, fantastic acting, a captivating story, truly pulse-pounding action sequences, and a surprising emotional impact. This film set the stage perfectly for its two sequels.

    I give it a rating of 9.7/10, and it is one of my ten favorite films of all time.
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  10. Jan 6, 2015
    10
    One of the best movies of all time. It has an epic plot with incredable acting and some of the most beautiful scenes on the planet. It was unlike anything I have scene before. Some people say that Game of Thrones surpasses this. I can't believe it.
  11. Dec 29, 2014
    10
    The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is a phenomenal beginning to a phenomenal trilogy. This movie nails every single aspect that it has perfectly. This is one of my favorite movies of all time.
  12. Dec 20, 2014
    10
    I must admit that I was never interested on watching "The Lord of the Rings" franchise, but when I decided to watch it, my conception about fantasy revolutionized.
    Marvelous screenplay. Extremely faithful to Professor Tolkien's novel. Peter Jackson took risks on adapting the trilogy to the big screen, but surely we can affirm: the risk was worth it.
  13. Dec 9, 2014
    9
    A wonderful and touching movie that truly is entertaining to watch.

    The Fellowship of the Ring is a highly unique movie, and it keeps me entertained every time I watch it, because it’s so damn good and the music is spectacular! Yes, some people might experience some slow and boring scenes, but I didn’t find anything boring at all, because the story and the characters totally keeps me
    A wonderful and touching movie that truly is entertaining to watch.

    The Fellowship of the Ring is a highly unique movie, and it keeps me entertained every time I watch it, because it’s so damn good and the music is spectacular! Yes, some people might experience some slow and boring scenes, but I didn’t find anything boring at all, because the story and the characters totally keeps me entertained every time I watch it. I’m also thrilled by how great Peter Jackson did the movie, because there’s almost nothing negative about The Fellowship of the Ring. One thing though, is the CGI. There are a lot of practical effects that totally is superior of todays CGI, and the CGI in The Fellowship of the Ring is amazing if you look at it from a 2000s perspective. I’m stunned how incredible they made this film, but if you look closely there are some vague CGI, but I don’t really care. Because the plot of The Fellowship of the Ring is stunning.

    This is one of the best movies of the 2000s.

    The Fellowship of the Ring gets a 9/10.
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  14. Nov 13, 2014
    9
    Fantastic in both presentation and immersion, this iteration of Tolkien's masterpiece is well done. Having both the greatest mentor of cinema and the greatest adventure in literature, this rendition will never be forgotten.
  15. Oct 18, 2014
    10
    An epic adventure of good against evil, a story of the power of friendship and individual courage, and the heroic quest to pave the way for the emergence of mankind, J.R.R. Tolkien's master work brought to cinematic life.
  16. Aug 24, 2014
    10
    A modern epic. A new classic. The Fellowship of the Ring kickstarts one of the finest trilogies in cinematic history. What Peter Jackson is able to accomplish, alongside an impeccable cast and crew, is astounding.
  17. Aug 12, 2014
    10
    So where do even begin? This film is the start to a truely legendary film series. This one is my personal favourite film of the three and of all time of course. I can easily say that all three of these films are some of the best films you will see at this time. All three deserve all of the praise they have recieved. Back to this film, the story is so interesting and immersing that you willSo where do even begin? This film is the start to a truely legendary film series. This one is my personal favourite film of the three and of all time of course. I can easily say that all three of these films are some of the best films you will see at this time. All three deserve all of the praise they have recieved. Back to this film, the story is so interesting and immersing that you will feel the insensitivity the excitement the emotion and everything pretty much. The atmosphere of middle earth gives you a masterful sense of adventure that no other films can quite capture to immerse you in. The characters in this are so badass and relatable that you can easily care what happens to them. Sure this film has a slow start but this kind of start really does speak to you unlike many other slow starts as it wins you over with the world of middle earth. The cgi is still good even now and believe me when I say this the people who made these films are like the cgi gods you will buy that the cgi characters In this look real and it keeps you Expand
  18. Aug 9, 2014
    10
    If this isn't the best set of fantasy movies then I don't what is. Others tend to disagree but I think The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is the best of the trilogy with The Return of the King not far behind a brilliant movie. With great heart and respect.
  19. Jul 30, 2014
    9
    A film that combines fantasy, adventure, romance, humour and horror, "The Fellowship of the Ring" is an unquestionable masterpiece. Jackson's accomplished direction and Lesnie's beautiful cinematography are to praise for this exceptional result signed by a magnificent performance by McKellen and many commendable others. The film has a dark tone that creates a thrilling and engrossingA film that combines fantasy, adventure, romance, humour and horror, "The Fellowship of the Ring" is an unquestionable masterpiece. Jackson's accomplished direction and Lesnie's beautiful cinematography are to praise for this exceptional result signed by a magnificent performance by McKellen and many commendable others. The film has a dark tone that creates a thrilling and engrossing atmosphere which breaths life into Tolkien's epic and casts a spell on the audience. Among its engaging sequences are the incidents at the mines of Moria, a true gem as they appear on screen. The visuals are truly stunning and the CGI splendid, from the magical Rivendell to the Balrog's inferno. Everything is bound together with Shore's Wagner-inspired orchestral score and evolves into one of the greatest cinematic achievements of 21-century film history. Expand
  20. Jul 14, 2014
    9
    Honestly I was scared to start watching this trilogy. I figured that the second I started watching I would lose the next 12 hours of my life.
    I was right.
    The second I started this one up, I knew that it was going to be amazing. Everything about it is on point. The acting, script, the score, everything. The cinematography was so good my jaw dropped regularly. Just watch it. Please. It's
    Honestly I was scared to start watching this trilogy. I figured that the second I started watching I would lose the next 12 hours of my life.
    I was right.
    The second I started this one up, I knew that it was going to be amazing. Everything about it is on point. The acting, script, the score, everything. The cinematography was so good my jaw dropped regularly.
    Just watch it. Please. It's amazing.
    Expand
  21. Jul 8, 2014
    4
    סרט ממש משעמם, הדמות היחידה שמעניינת הכל הטרילוגיה הזו לא בדיוק נמצאת שם, ואין שום רגע אחד מרגש או מותח, אתם לא תתחברו לדמויות כל כך, אין רגע שתזכרו מהסרט עד שתרדמו
  22. Jun 9, 2014
    9
    This absolutely floored me. I was always a doubter, thinking that there is no way this was as good as people said it was. Boy was I ever wrong. Phenomenal film. The visual effects were absolutely dazzling (seriously, could one "set" not be absolutely breathtaking, please?), the cinematography was great, the score was pitch perfect, and the acting was great as well. It is amazing how IThis absolutely floored me. I was always a doubter, thinking that there is no way this was as good as people said it was. Boy was I ever wrong. Phenomenal film. The visual effects were absolutely dazzling (seriously, could one "set" not be absolutely breathtaking, please?), the cinematography was great, the score was pitch perfect, and the acting was great as well. It is amazing how I could sleep so hard on this one. I am unfamiliar with the novels, but still, seeing this world come to life is amazing. On top of everything I mentioned, the action is always amazingly put together and the CGI is used to perfection. Another thing is this one's corner is the fact that its 3 hour run time simply did not feel like 3 hours. The time really flew by and never really dragged. Typically, with films of this length, there are some things that feel like extra, but here, everything included was undoubtedly needed. Ultimately, as the first film in the trilogy, this one sets up the following two films very well. It is amazing to think that this is often considered the lesser of the three films. Expand
  23. May 25, 2014
    10
    I just cant decide between this movie and the 3rd LOTR movie of which is my favourite. The action and story is amazing and keeps you glued to the screen from start to end!
  24. May 20, 2014
    10
    I never got into this movie when I saw it in the theater back in 2001. And even after I saw it again and "found" it, "The Fellowship of the Ring" has always remained the part of the trilogy I like the least. Not that it's saying much, considering how much I like the others.

    The beginning of the movie is slow (but not as slow as the book's), setting an image of a peaceful folk called
    I never got into this movie when I saw it in the theater back in 2001. And even after I saw it again and "found" it, "The Fellowship of the Ring" has always remained the part of the trilogy I like the least. Not that it's saying much, considering how much I like the others.

    The beginning of the movie is slow (but not as slow as the book's), setting an image of a peaceful folk called Hobbits, who don't like trouble and like to eat lots - enjoyed with good ale and excellent pipe weed.

    But then there are the Bagginses... They are not like the other Hobbits - not quite. When Frodo and Sam - with the addition of Merry and Pippin - head out towards the town of Bree, it is soon clear that their Hobbit lifestyle is gone for now.

    Innocence is pushed away as we plunge into dark, grim tale of bloody history and heroes who failed and fell to the temptation of the One Ring.

    My favorite part starts when the Hobbits, led by Strider, later known as Aragorn, reach Rivendell.

    I could go on and on about the wonderful cast that I fell in love with, and whose performances keep getting better and better as their characters grow. Orlando Bloom as Legolas had always been my favorite. Merry and Pippin (Dominic Monaghan and Billy Boyd) offer the flawless comic relief more times than you could ask for it.

    As for the others... The Elves are enchanting, and their homes just blow your mind with their beauty. The Nazgûl are hauntingly beautiful and terrible at the same time. The scenery, before and after the Fellowship has been chosen, is so beautiful it's hard to imagine you would have a hard time traveling it; New Zealand at its best.

    Although there are small mistakes here and there (most of them funny when you know where to look), and the "size-doubles" don't work very well at times, you forgive them because the story is great. It just doesn't matter.

    Like in all the parts of the trilogy, they balance action scenes very well with the calmer ones. You don't get bored. There are a lot of funny moments that reflect on the differences between the characters - and at the same time show you just how they are bonding with each other. This is what makes the next parts so amazing; you actually care about what happens to each and every one of them, and they do not remain hollow and meaningless.

    If something needs to be complained about, it is the few quick cuts within a scene between Saruman and Gandalf in Isengard; the dialogue flows but we are taken from one place to another. But that's a minor thing, and in a way, it really works. It just seemed a bit odd in the perfect flow of everything else. Like they wanted to do the same scene in different places at once.

    The movie ends in a good spot, leaving us hanging just the right way. It gives you just the right kind of itch to watch the next movie - and then the final one.

    And by the way, if you can get your hands on the extended version, don't bother with the theater release. The longer the better, says I!
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  25. May 5, 2014
    9
    A fun engaging movie that captures the spirit of its books. The Lord of the Rings 1 has a great cast, score, effects, action, you name it. Even though this film is nearly 3 hours, and feels like it, but you dont get bored of it.
  26. May 2, 2014
    8
    the movie, Lord of the Rings is very good, is a film that I recommend to people who like adventure movies, but he has some problems of fidelity to the book, surreal things and poorly explained.
  27. Mar 29, 2014
    9
    The first adaption of The Lord of the Rings is a great start to an epic trilogy. It might drag a little at the beginning, so I wouldn't say the movies are for everyone, but when it does get into some action it is amazingly done! There is also good drama and some cool characters. The Fellowship of the Ring is fantastic!
  28. Feb 2, 2014
    10
    The first Lord of the Rings is the best. I'm not one to flock to sci-fi movies, but I find this series to be the epitome of the genre. All of the movies can be enjoyed by almost anyone, and not just fans, which makes these movies even more amazing.
  29. Dec 8, 2013
    8
    Really good. It´s beautiful, exciting, emotive, epic. It has all that, but you can´t give it a 10. First of all the last part of the trilogy is the best, so you have to reserve it for that one if anything. It´s a really good mix of characters, wonderful to see all of them working together. Although the heart of the film and the entire trilogy (especially in the last sequel) is theReally good. It´s beautiful, exciting, emotive, epic. It has all that, but you can´t give it a 10. First of all the last part of the trilogy is the best, so you have to reserve it for that one if anything. It´s a really good mix of characters, wonderful to see all of them working together. Although the heart of the film and the entire trilogy (especially in the last sequel) is the relationship between Frodo and Sam. It can be all the epic you want when it comes to action, score, visuals, etc, but this is what makes the movie. And this is why many other big budget films fail miserably quality wise. I was going to give this one a 9 but there are a few scenes towards the end that I don´t like too much, a little bit repetitive. Best moments are the beginning of the journey and the whole time the spend in Moria, really exciting. Expand
  30. Dec 6, 2013
    10
    The first film of the series, "LOTR: The Fellowship of the Ring" is emotionally fulfilling, brilliantly plotted and exciting. This movie is a masterpiece and a textbook example on how to create an epic adventure. The special extended edition, at 208 minutes, does not seem overlong at all.
Metascore
92

Universal acclaim - based on 34 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 33 out of 34
  2. Negative: 0 out of 34
  1. 100
    I see it as nearly perfect: It's one of the best fantasy pictures ever made.
  2. An extraordinary work, grandly conceived, brilliantly executed and wildly entertaining. It's a hobbit's dream, a wizard's delight. And, of course, it's only the beginning.
  3. 70
    Above all, Jackson evokes an almost palpable sense of the will to power trapped within the ring. Without this evocation of the ring's insidious ability to sniff out the potential for corruption and capitalize on it, the entire enterprise would be precious drivel.