New Line Cinema | Release Date: December 17, 2003
9.0
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Universal acclaim based on 2629 Ratings
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10
serkanysr1Nov 25, 2016
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Fantastic films aside, Lord of the rings aside. With the last film of the series, almost the entire series was signed.And I do not know if such a trilogy comes up again. Expand
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10
TheGreatDustyCZAug 3, 2016
When i was a little kid, i didn't understand the film a lot, but when i´ve get older, i watched it again, i´ve watch it a lot, the whole trilogy of course. And i must admit, it is a perfection itself, it has a great cast, soundtrack, BEST CGIWhen i was a little kid, i didn't understand the film a lot, but when i´ve get older, i watched it again, i´ve watch it a lot, the whole trilogy of course. And i must admit, it is a perfection itself, it has a great cast, soundtrack, BEST CGI i´ve ever saw and the location, New Zeland is a wonderful land, what else to say? The greatest movie ever made. 100% Expand
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10
MasterRileyJul 20, 2016
The best conclusion to Tolkien's stories anyone could have ever asked for. The Return of the King is more than a satisfying conclusion with great casting, great acting, great action, great effects, great world building, and great music.
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7
Aaron_WassermanMay 31, 2016
An overlong movie, that is considered a masterpiece, though I'm not entirely sure why. It is a good movie do not get me wrong, but if you aren't invested in the books, it's hard to find investment in the films.
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10
Zishah_1990May 22, 2016
The lord of the rings return of the King is a truly epic conclusion to the trilogy. Till this day I can go back and watch it and still be amazeed visually and emotionally. This piece of art is truly a must see to all movie lovers.
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10
aadityamudharApr 17, 2016
This is simply a masterpiece.
You will never see a trilogy like this one, essential for your cinematographic culture. The Return of the King is the prove that third parts can be much better than the first or second one.
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10
MovieMasterEddyApr 17, 2016
A “King” that earns its crown, Peter Jackson’s final installment in his monumental “The Lord of the Rings” represents that filmmaking rarity — a third part of a trilogy that is decisively the best of the lot. With epic conflict, staggeringA “King” that earns its crown, Peter Jackson’s final installment in his monumental “The Lord of the Rings” represents that filmmaking rarity — a third part of a trilogy that is decisively the best of the lot. With epic conflict, staggering battles, striking landscapes and effects, and resolved character arcs all leading to a dramatic conclusion to more than nine hours of masterful storytelling, “The Return of the King” is an urgently paced 200-minute film without an ounce of fat — until unfortunate multiple endings that go on and on, as if Jackson couldn’t bear to let go.

In the rarefied world of large-scaled cinematic triptychs, three in the modern era quickly come to mind that, initially at least, combined striking cinematic prowess with enormous public enthusiasm: “The Godfather,” “Star Wars” and “The Matrix.” In the first two instances, the second film was by general consensus the best and most adventurous, while the third was by far the weakest across the boards.

What Jackson and New Line so boldly did right was to shoot all three in one continuous stretch rather than start from scratch each time.

Of all the wonders associated with this trio of films — the literate, generally well structured overall script, the perfection of the New Zealand locations, the visionary scenic designs, the exceptional visual effects, the costumes, hair and armor, and the excellent cast — perhaps the most impressive feat of all has been Jackson’s ability to keep it all in his head through the years and deliver a cohesive work with a proper sense of balance and proportion.

Unlike his predecessors in the trilogy business, of course, Jackson had a ready-made three-part text to work from, one constructed to pay off in the climactic installment. And pay off it does, in ways guaranteed to satisfy the multitudes around the world who embraced the first two films, and even to impress non-card-carrying members of the massive Tolkien-Jackson cult.

Still, anyone who hasn’t seen the first two pics won’t have a clue what’s going on at the outset of “The Return of the King.” With much struggle behind him but the worst yet to come, Frodo (Elijah Wood) is increasingly feeling the weight of being the Ringbearer as he and his faithful friend Sam (Sean Astin) make their way toward Mount Doom, the place where the Ring was made and the only place it can be destroyed, thus thwarting Sauron’s attempt to destroy humankind.

In a way new to the trilogy, the emotional momentum surges along with the physical action. After early ambivalence over his responsibility for the Ring, Frodo grows into the job; after long dodging his royal inheritance, Aragorn finally rises to the occasion; Sam, especially, emerges as a three-dimensional character of intense devotion to Frodo even after he has been tricked by the Iago-like Gollum and exiled by his closest friend; and the ineffectual Hobbits Pippin and Merry take on some size, figuratively if not literally.

The building sense of dread is palpable. With the belching Mount Doom and its all-powerful hovering Eye in the distance, humankind and Orcs alike traverse an already stark landscape that will shortly become scorched. Dreadful giant screeching dragons, called Fell Beasts, flap down out the sky to pluck hapless soldiers off their feet and horses. And the Orcs are assisted by yet more monsters, including Hulk-like Trolls and towering, long-tusked mastodons known as Mumakil, that strike terror and make resistance seem futile.

With these forces massing to decide the fate of civilization, Gandalf tries to buy time for Frodo to plunge the Ring into the lava at Mount Doom. To greater effect than he has at any point in the three films, Jackson cuts among different sets of activity, the most spectacular being the battle and the most emotionally intense being Frodo’s painful, inch-by-inch journey.

The siege of Minas Tirith may well be the mother of all cinematic battles; certainly no pre-CGI war film ever featured a scene involving upwards of 200,000 soldiers. But that’s how many Orcs maraud the city, and the details are extraordinary: the huge stones catapulted at the fortifications from mobile towers; the fire-breathing dragon battering ram that crashes through the main gates; the earth-shaking Mumakil that raze all before them with scythe-like tusks and carry dozens of men; the gradual movement of the battle from the ground to the upper levels of the exquisitely designed citadel. All of “The Lord of the Rings” has been building to this, and it delivers entirely.

All the outstanding technical and craft achievements that have been duly honored in the previous installments are at least equaled and sometimes trumped here, especially in regard to how involved the creatures are this time. There has been no let-up in creativity, only intensification.

So Jackson has done it. After seven years of work, Jackson has pulled off one of the most ambitious and phenomenally successful dream projects of all!
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10
mahdi-shadowMar 28, 2016
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. my best trilogy ever and the return of the king was good and epic.It's a perfect epic. There's not one false step. The battles are incredible, the characters just as fun as ever. This movie is basically flawless. One of the best ever Expand
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10
MovieMasterEdMar 22, 2016
Peter Jackson's final installment in his "The Lord of the Rings" represents that filmmaking rarity -- a third part of a trilogy that is decisively the best of the lot. With epic conflict, staggering battles, striking landscapes and effects,Peter Jackson's final installment in his "The Lord of the Rings" represents that filmmaking rarity -- a third part of a trilogy that is decisively the best of the lot. With epic conflict, staggering battles, striking landscapes and effects, and resolved character arcs all leading to a dramatic conclusion to more than nine hours of masterful storytelling, "King" is an urgently paced 200-minute film without an ounce of fat -- until unfortunate multiple endings that go on and on, as if Jackson couldn't bear to let go.

In the rarefied world of large-scaled cinematic triptychs, three in the modern era quickly come to mind that, initially at least, combined striking cinematic prowess with enormous public enthusiasm: “The Godfather,” “Star Wars” and “The Matrix.” In the first two instances, the second film was by general consensus the best and most adventurous, while the third was by far the weakest across the boards.

What Jackson and New Line so boldly did right was to shoot all three in one continuous stretch rather than start from scratch each time.

Of all the wonders associated with this trio of films — the literate, generally well structured overall script, the perfection of the New Zealand locations, the visionary scenic designs, the exceptional visual effects, the costumes, hair and armor, and the excellent cast — perhaps the most impressive feat of all has been Jackson’s ability to keep it all in his head through the years and deliver a cohesive work with a proper sense of balance and proportion.

Unlike his predecessors in the trilogy business, of course, Jackson had a ready-made three-part text to work from, one constructed to pay off in the climactic installment. And pay off it does, in ways guaranteed to satisfy the multitudes around the world who embraced the first two films, and even to impress non-card-carrying members of the massive Tolkien-Jackson cult.

Still, anyone who hasn’t seen the first two pics won’t have a clue what’s going on at the outset of “The Return of the King.” With much struggle behind him but the worst yet to come, Frodo (Elijah Wood) is increasingly feeling the weight of being the Ringbearer as he and his faithful friend Sam (Sean Astin) make their way toward Mount Doom, the place where the Ring was made and the only place it can be destroyed, thus thwarting Sauron’s attempt to destroy humankind.

In a way new to the trilogy, the emotional momentum surges along with the physical action. After early ambivalence over his responsibility for the Ring, Frodo grows into the job; after long dodging his royal inheritance, Aragorn finally rises to the occasion; Sam, especially, emerges as a three-dimensional character of intense devotion to Frodo even after he has been tricked by the Iago-like Gollum and exiled by his closest friend; and the ineffectual Hobbits Pippin and Merry take on some size, figuratively if not literally.

The building sense of dread is palpable. With the belching Mount Doom and its all-powerful hovering Eye in the distance, humankind and Orcs alike traverse an already stark landscape that will shortly become scorched. Dreadful giant screeching dragons, called Fell Beasts, flap down out the sky to pluck hapless soldiers off their feet and horses. And the Orcs are assisted by yet more monsters, including Hulk-like Trolls and towering, long-tusked mastodons known as Mumakil, that strike terror and make resistance seem futile.

The siege of Minas Tirith may well be the mother of all cinematic battles; certainly no pre-CGI war film ever featured a scene involving upwards of 200,000 soldiers. But that’s how many Orcs maraud the city, and the details are extraordinary: the huge stones catapulted at the fortifications from mobile towers; the fire-breathing dragon battering ram that crashes through the main gates; the earth-shaking Mumakil that raze all before them with scythe-like tusks and carry dozens of men; the gradual movement of the battle from the ground to the upper levels of the exquisitely designed citadel. All of “The Lord of the Rings” has been building to this, and it delivers entirely.

There are a few nits to be picked. With the forces of humankind vastly outnumbered, Aragorn is forced to seek the help of innumerable “dead” but still loyal soldiers to help out against the Orcs. Even in a work of fantasy and myth, this device just doesn’t wash, a circumstance not helped by the fact that the unconvincing effects used to represent them on the battlefield make them look like a bunch of green ghosts dashing across the field.

All the outstanding technical and craft achievements that have been duly honored in the previous installments are at least equaled and sometimes trumped here, especially in regard to how involved the creatures are this time. There has been no let-up in creativity, only intensification.

So Jackson has done it.
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10
MerajMar 19, 2016
For me it was the best movie of all time. This movie has an amazing story and awesome visual effects with charismatic characters. This movie deserves 11 academy awards and all of other awards which received.
Probably the music of this movie
For me it was the best movie of all time. This movie has an amazing story and awesome visual effects with charismatic characters. This movie deserves 11 academy awards and all of other awards which received.
Probably the music of this movie is the best music between all of movies
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10
CinemassacreMar 13, 2016
A “King” that earns its crown, Peter Jackson’s final installment in his monumental “The Lord of the Rings” represents that filmmaking rarity — a third part of a trilogy that is decisively the best of the lot. With epic conflict, staggeringA “King” that earns its crown, Peter Jackson’s final installment in his monumental “The Lord of the Rings” represents that filmmaking rarity — a third part of a trilogy that is decisively the best of the lot. With epic conflict, staggering battles, striking landscapes and effects, and resolved character arcs all leading to a dramatic conclusion to more than nine hours of masterful storytelling, “The Return of the King” is an urgently paced 200-minute film without an ounce of fat — until unfortunate multiple endings that go on and on, as if Jackson couldn’t bear to let go. Again unlike other trilogy finales, this one will rank with its predecessors at the box office, where the first two entries have generated $1.786 billion internationally. Ancillary benefits from various versions and packaging will issue forth close to forever.

In the rarefied world of large-scaled cinematic triptychs, three in the modern era quickly come to mind that, initially at least, combined striking cinematic prowess with enormous public enthusiasm: “The Godfather,” “Star Wars” and “The Matrix.” In the first two instances, the second film was by general consensus the best and most adventurous, while the third was by far the weakest across the boards.

What Jackson and New Line so boldly did right was to shoot all three in one continuous stretch rather than start from scratch each time.

Of all the wonders associated with this trio of films — the literate, generally well structured overall script, the perfection of the New Zealand locations, the visionary scenic designs, the exceptional visual effects, the costumes, hair and armor, and the excellent cast — perhaps the most impressive feat of all has been Jackson’s ability to keep it all in his head through the years and deliver a cohesive work with a proper sense of balance and proportion.

Unlike his predecessors in the trilogy business, of course, Jackson had a ready-made three-part text to work from, one constructed to pay off in the climactic installment. And pay off it does, in ways guaranteed to satisfy the multitudes around the world who embraced the first two films, and even to impress non-card-carrying members of the massive Tolkien-Jackson cult.

Still, anyone who hasn’t seen the first two pics won’t have a clue what’s going on at the outset of “The Return of the King.” With much struggle behind him but the worst yet to come, Frodo (Elijah Wood) is increasingly feeling the weight of being the Ringbearer as he and his faithful friend Sam (Sean Astin) make their way toward Mount Doom, the place where the Ring was made and the only place it can be destroyed, thus thwarting Sauron’s attempt to destroy humankind.

“The days are growing darker,” Frodo observes amid distant volcanic eruptions, as he and Sam continue to be guided by the fretful Gollum (Andy Serkis), the deformed former Ringbearer whose intended treachery is superbly revealed in a schizophrenic soliloquy delivered to his reflection in the water.

Meanwhile, in Rohan, the flush of victory over Saruman’s forces in the Battle of Helm’s Deep at the end of “The Two Towers” doesn’t last long (defeated and trapped in the last film, Christopher Lee’s wonderfully realized character unfortunately doesn’t even appear here).

A faux pas by Pippin (Billy Boyd) provokes Gandalf (Ian McKellen) to remove him to Minas Tirith, the magnificent White City and capital of Gondor built on a soaring outcropping of rock. There, they find a kingdom in decline under a steward, Denethor (John Noble), so distraught over the death of his elder son that his rash decisions are not to be trusted.

All the outstanding technical and craft achievements that have been duly honored in the previous installments are at least equaled and sometimes trumped here, especially in regard to how involved the creatures are this time. There has been no let-up in creativity, only intensification.

So Jackson has done it. After seven years of work, the young New Zealander has pulled off one of the most ambitious and phenomenally successful dream projects of all time, a complete visual rendering of a 1,000-page literary classic beloved by countless readers internationally, a set of films that satisfies the Tolkien purists and, when all is said and done, will generate well upwards of $3 billion in all markets.
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10
americanbeautyJan 16, 2016
Esse filme é simplesmente uma obra de arte, uma conclusão épica para uma trilogia épica. Em O Retorno do Rei o que já era bom ficou melhor ainda, incríveis cenas de ação com uma trilha sonora impecável, O Senhor dos Anéis é, definitivamente,Esse filme é simplesmente uma obra de arte, uma conclusão épica para uma trilogia épica. Em O Retorno do Rei o que já era bom ficou melhor ainda, incríveis cenas de ação com uma trilha sonora impecável, O Senhor dos Anéis é, definitivamente, a melhor coisa que eu já assisti na vida. Expand
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10
reviewer2015lolJan 9, 2016
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. It's so good, so amazing, so epic and so beautiful it's just unbelievebla.. If you ake a movie that is so good, you should know you are the master of fantasy movies. Bravo Peter Jackson, just bravo. Expand
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10
gameguardian21Jan 7, 2016
This is the best book- to- movie adaptation put to film as this remains my second favorite movie of all time. It has the most emotional story line, amazing action sequences, and it's all thanks to peter Jackson. This one of the best films, inThis is the best book- to- movie adaptation put to film as this remains my second favorite movie of all time. It has the most emotional story line, amazing action sequences, and it's all thanks to peter Jackson. This one of the best films, in one of the best trilogy's of all time. Expand
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10
TheMovieDoctorJan 7, 2016
According to the calendar, Christmas is December 25. According to the movie release schedule, it's December 17. There can be no greater gift for a movie lover than the one bestowed upon audiences by Peter Jackson, whose The Lord of the Rings:According to the calendar, Christmas is December 25. According to the movie release schedule, it's December 17. There can be no greater gift for a movie lover than the one bestowed upon audiences by Peter Jackson, whose The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is not only the best movie of 2003, but the crowning cinematic achievement of the past several years. In fact, labeling this as a "movie" is almost an injustice. This is an experience of epic scope and grandeur, amazing emotional power, and relentless momentum.

One could be forgiven for initially approaching The Return of the King with a little trepidation. As good as the first two films, The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, are (in either their theatrical or extended DVD versions), movie history is littered with occasions when trilogy conclusions have crashed and burned. Return of the Jedi. Godfather III. The Matrix Revolutions. And so on? Yet, with The Return of the King, Jackson has done more than just bucked the trend. Not only is this motion picture an entirely worthy conclusion to the landmark trilogy, but it's better than its predecessors. Somehow, Jackson has managed to synthesize what worked in The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, while siphoning off the less successful elements. The result is amazing. Taken as a whole, there is nothing out there today that can come close to comparing to The Lord of the Rings.

The slowest portions of The Return of the King occur early in the proceedings, as Jackson re-establishes the characters. From there, it's a slow, steady buildup to a rousing climax. The experience is so immersive that I found myself in the middle of the Battle of the Pelennor Fields along with the heroes, rooting for them - even though I knew how things were going to turn out! Along the way, there are moments of genuine pathos that draw a tear from the eye; times of triumph that cause the heart to soar; instances of overwhelming tension that cause the adrenaline to surge; and images of spectacle that make the jaw drop. The pace is unflagging - once Jackson has us, he doesn't let go. When the movie was over, I couldn't believe that 3 1/4 hours had passed.

Although it's unfair to characterize the film as a collection of great moments - the character arcs and overall narrative are too strong for that - it is nevertheless impossible to deny the power of many individual scenes. One of Jackson's most notable contributions is that he directs the film with the intention that certain instances will raise nape hairs. It's the "wow" factor, and it is frequently repeated. Gene Siskel once argued that a great film needs three memorable scenes to go along with no bad ones. The Return of the King exceeds that criteria by a considerable amount.

I can think of three key reasons why this film is stronger than the earlier chapters. The first is that this is the conclusion - the resolution we have eagerly awaited for what seems like more than two years. The second is that Jackson, like Tolkien, saved the best for last. As impressive as the Battle of Helms Deep was, it is dwarfed by the Siege of Minas Tirith and the Battle of the Pelennor Fields. And Frodo's struggles have become magnified. Jackson views elements of the hobbit's travails as operatic (witness the choral aspects of Howard Shore's score). Finally, there's the simple fact that we have gotten to know the characters. By now, they have been with us for two years and six hours of screen time (over seven if you count the DVD special editions).

For those who despise truncated endings, Jackson has a treat in store. The Return of the King ends with a 20 minute epilogue that chronicles events after the War of the Ring, going as much as four years into the future and tying up nearly every possible loose end. The film concludes on exactly the same note as the book (in fact, with the same line), and, while the final chapter of the trilogy is as satisfying as it could possibly be, there's still a vague sense of melancholy when "The End" appears on the screen, because it means that these adventures are over.

Expectedly, the special effects set a new standard. The CGI participants of the major battles look more like real combatants than cartoonish computer creations. The locations, set design, and costumes are without flaw. By building many of the elaborate locales, Jackson achieves a sense of verisimilitude that he might not have attained by relying more heavily on computers. And composer Howard Shore's score is perfectly wed to the visuals, being alternately bombastic and delicate, as circumstances dictate.

The Lord of the Rings will go down in cinematic lore as a milestone. It has legitimatized fantasy like no other production and has shown that it is possible for studio executives to realize huge gains when taking huge risks. The present illustrates its broad appeal and undeniable critical and commercial success.
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9
EpicLadySpongeJan 5, 2016
This long movie for the end of the Lord of the Rings will just simply pull out all your excitement for a waste of 201 minutes. I don't really have anything else to say other than just saying these repetitive words for each review I give forThis long movie for the end of the Lord of the Rings will just simply pull out all your excitement for a waste of 201 minutes. I don't really have anything else to say other than just saying these repetitive words for each review I give for movies I've already seen in the past. Expand
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10
anichelsJan 1, 2016
Top 20 movies of all time, and that's very conservative estimate. Return of the King was a very satisfying end to the Lord of the Rings trilogy, and it signified the end of an era for many fans of the movies.
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10
BozaslanNov 12, 2015
I've never seen a series like this.A trilogy of movies created with such love and care and utter perfection of craft that you can't help but walk away and wonder how did Peter Jackson make this possible? I have always loved the original "StarI've never seen a series like this.A trilogy of movies created with such love and care and utter perfection of craft that you can't help but walk away and wonder how did Peter Jackson make this possible? I have always loved the original "Star Wars" and "Indiana Jones" series for their epic storytelling, and just for just fitting in as a great moment in cinema. This should be, will be, remembered with as much revered fondness for generations to come. They do not make films like these anymore. Expand
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10
adithyaSep 9, 2015
This film shows us that even 3 hour films can be so good and epic. These is the greatest films of our era. Let there be no doubt. peter jackson showed hollywood that even fantasy films can be superb
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10
DanilSirotkinJul 24, 2015
Властелин Колец: Возвращение Короля (The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King) я по праву считаю самым ЗРЕЛИЩНЫМ, самым ЭПИЧЕСКИМ фильмом в истории. До определённого момента именно третий фильм я считал лучшим в трилогии. Явно видно, чтоВластелин Колец: Возвращение Короля (The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King) я по праву считаю самым ЗРЕЛИЩНЫМ, самым ЭПИЧЕСКИМ фильмом в истории. До определённого момента именно третий фильм я считал лучшим в трилогии. Явно видно, что создатели вложили в него уйму сил. Про сюжет, актёров и спецэффекты я писать не буду, так как там они на максимально высоком уровне. Говард Шор на этот раз превзошёл самого себя, и заслуженно получил свой второй оскар (первый был за "Братство"). Трек "Сигнальные Огни", или "Белое Древо" я считаю лучшей композицией Шора, и его абсолютным шедевром. В этом фильме все сюжетные линии подходят к концу. Добро побеждает зло. Перед нами разворачиваются великие битвы - (самые великие за историю кино, конечно же). И самое главное, мы видим уничтожение кольца. Итак, какой же главный смысл Властелина Колец (по моему мнению)? Попробую объяснить. Кольцо, - это ЗЛО. Фродо, - это человек, который по собственному желанию ВЗВАЛИВАЕТ ЕГО НА СЕБЯ, НЕСЁТ ЕГО НА СЕБЕ, дабы УНИЧТОЖИТЬ. Вопрос: это каким надо быть человеком, чтобы (образно) согласиться нести на себе ВСЁ ЗЛО МИРА? Этот человек знает, что будет страдать, знает, что будет мучиться, то есть, он совершает своего рода САМОПОЖЕРТВОВАНИЕ. Но ради чего? - Ради того, что он любит, ради того, что В МИРЕ ЕСТЬ ДОБРО. И, сами подумайте, это до какой степени надо любить. Этот человек знает, что зло нелегко победить, он даже предполагает, что поход против зла может стоить ему жизни... ДУМАЙТЕ. Властелин Колец - это философское произведение ОБО ВСЁМ. Например, о безграничной любви к дому, и защите его. Защиту дома мы могли бы лицезреть в конце этого фильма, если бы Джексон, конечно, снял её. Но, к сожалению, он её не снял. Также, все произведения Толкина о любви к природе. Размышлять можно много, но нужно ДЕЙСТВОВАТЬ. Итак, ещё я хочу сказать, что ВК, конечно же, нужно смотреть только в РЕЖИССЁРСКИХ(РАСШИРЕННЫХ) ВЕРСИЯХ, которые интереснее театральных, и ближе к книге. К тому же, такие фильмы длиннее театральных (это при условии того, что даже театральная версия идёт 558 минут (за все 3 фильма, - ( а режиссёрская версия идёт 683 (!) минуты)), - но я совершенно не против очень длинных фильмов, и даже наоборот, всегда отстаиваю максимально длинный хронометраж во всём. В общем, Властелин Колец классика, как кино, так и литературы. Могу писать ещё много, но остановлюсь. А на что вы готовы ради того, что любите? 100/100 или 10/10 (или 5/5 или 4/4). Expand
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10
JohnMasterLJul 20, 2015
La mejor película de fantasía de todos los tiempos. The Return of the King es hermosa, perfecta, una aventura de 3 horas y 21 minutos repleta de emociones, es totalmente épica, dramática, divertida y poderosa. Peter Jackson creo una obraLa mejor película de fantasía de todos los tiempos. The Return of the King es hermosa, perfecta, una aventura de 3 horas y 21 minutos repleta de emociones, es totalmente épica, dramática, divertida y poderosa. Peter Jackson creo una obra maestra única e insuperable. Coloca las 3 partes juntas y obtendrás la mejor aventura mágica y épica de todos los tiempos con duración de casi 10 horas. Ganadora de 11 premios de la Academia. The Lord of the Rings es la mejor trilogía que eh visto. Expand
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INfamous119Jul 3, 2015
This is by far the best Movie trilogy I have ever seen. great picture, great characters, great animations, great sound. My only concern is sometimes the time in the movie would be a little off.
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10
VinceRocks123Jun 25, 2015
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Peter Jackson wields his wizardly holy direction to astounding heights in the final chapter of Tolkien's LOTR franchise with the magnificent Return of the King, which easily will be remembered as one of the greatest movies of all time.

With Sauron's forces closing overshadowing almost all of middle earth, Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen) with the aid of Gandalf (Sir Ian McKellen) must fulfill his destiny as the rightful king of Gondor, as they lead a united army in a final stance against Sauron's forces on the peak of Minus Tirith (in one of the most longest expensive and visually well edited battle sequence ever caught on film).

Meanwhile as Frodo closes in on the mountain of Doom, the rings' power goes out of control far than he can bear as its evil influence begin to corrupt him, with its infatuation on his eyes. Gollum once known as the treasonous hobbit Smeagol (Andy Serkis in his finest performance yet) also falls once again prey to the rings' seductive power as he plots to betray Frodo to once again reclaim the ring, and amidst the chaos Sam is framed to be against Frodo by Gollum, pitying the odds to be winning in Sauron's favor that threatens to seal the fate of Middle Earth once and for all.

Spectacular in both visual direction, cinematography, as well as the action sequences, the film also improves more on the performances especially Wood, Serkis, and Billy Boyd as Samwise as it displays them giving into the rings destructive power, with a detailed flashback of Smeagol's encounter with the Ring and how it destroyed his character forever, helmed by a much more masterful directing by Jackson.

Hands down the best trilogy as I conclude my triple 5 star review wrapping in the finest writing I can muster.
Winner of 11 academy awards including best picture, the film is more enhanced in epic scope and powerful in being a magnificent chapter to be seen to believe.
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DrewtheDude85May 28, 2015
With the first two Lord of the Rings films being so amazing to where they were basically masterpieces, the bar was really raised to the highest peak for this third film, but Peter Jackson delivered. The Return of the King is an absoluteWith the first two Lord of the Rings films being so amazing to where they were basically masterpieces, the bar was really raised to the highest peak for this third film, but Peter Jackson delivered. The Return of the King is an absolute cinematic masterpiece and quite possibly the greatest film that I have ever witnessed. Every single time I see this film, I feel absolutely awe-inspired afterwards. I never felt that this film dragged on too much, every minute of it felt special even though this film is 200 Minutes long. The action scenes are at it's best with this film, you will captivated throughout this film's fighting scenes and other perilous scenes. Everything else that also made the first two LOTR films so great are also back plus more. However, the climax is phenomenal! The Climax of this film is probably the greatest movie scene ever made in my opinion and arguably worth the price of admission alone (even though the first 2/3rds of the film are still fantastic). The Climax is extremely emotional and meaningful and I love it! I really can't think of a single thing about this film that is bad or even mediocre; IT"S THAT GOOD. If you are a movie lover then do your self a favor and watch The Lord of the Rings trilogy. All three films are Masterpieces and this final film will not disappoint, guaranteed. Expand
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ZawMineMay 11, 2015
Undeniably one of the best movies in the cinema history. Such an amazing fantasy film. Return of the King is my favourite in the LOTR trilogy. I think most people's favourite is this one. All in all, Return of the King is awesome.
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10
CinemaSinsMay 9, 2015
According to the calendar, Christmas is December 25. According to the movie release schedule, it's December 17. There can be no greater gift for a movie lover than the one bestowed upon audiences by Peter Jackson, whose The Lord of the Rings:According to the calendar, Christmas is December 25. According to the movie release schedule, it's December 17. There can be no greater gift for a movie lover than the one bestowed upon audiences by Peter Jackson, whose The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is not only the best movie of 2003, but the crowning cinematic achievement of the past several years. In fact, labeling this as a "movie" is almost an injustice. This is an experience of epic scope and grandeur, amazing emotional power, and relentless momentum.

One could be forgiven for initially approaching The Return of the King with a little trepidation. As good as the first two films, The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, are (in either their theatrical or extended DVD versions), movie history is littered with occasions when trilogy conclusions have crashed and burned. Return of the Jedi. Godfather III. The Matrix Revolutions. And so on? Yet, with The Return of the King, Jackson has done more than just bucked the trend. Not only is this motion picture an entirely worthy conclusion to the landmark trilogy, but it's better than its predecessors. Somehow, Jackson has managed to synthesize what worked in The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, while siphoning off the less successful elements. The result is amazing. Taken as a whole, there is nothing out there today that can come close to comparing to The Lord of the Rings.

The slowest portions of The Return of the King occur early in the proceedings, as Jackson re-establishes the characters. From there, it's a slow, steady buildup to a rousing climax. The experience is so immersive that I found myself in the middle of the Battle of the Pelennor Fields along with the heroes, rooting for them - even though I knew how things were going to turn out! Along the way, there are moments of genuine pathos that draw a tear from the eye; times of triumph that cause the heart to soar; instances of overwhelming tension that cause the adrenaline to surge; and images of spectacle that make the jaw drop. The pace is unflagging - once Jackson has us, he doesn't let go. When the movie was over, I couldn't believe that 3 1/4 hours had passed.

Although it's unfair to characterize the film as a collection of great moments - the character arcs and overall narrative are too strong for that - it is nevertheless impossible to deny the power of many individual scenes. One of Jackson's most notable contributions is that he directs the film with the intention that certain instances will raise nape hairs. It's the "wow" factor, and it is frequently repeated. Gene Siskel once argued that a great film needs three memorable scenes to go along with no bad ones. The Return of the King exceeds that criteria by a considerable amount.

For those who despise truncated endings, Jackson has a treat in store. The Return of the King ends with a 20 minute epilogue that chronicles events after the War of the Ring, going as much as four years into the future and tying up nearly every possible loose end. The film concludes on exactly the same note as the book (in fact, with the same line), and, while the final chapter of the trilogy is as satisfying as it could possibly be, there's still a vague sense of melancholy when "The End" appears on the screen, because it means that these adventures are over.

Expectedly, the special effects set a new standard. The CGI participants of the major battles look more like real combatants than cartoonish computer creations. The locations, set design, and costumes are without flaw. By building many of the elaborate locales, Jackson achieves a sense of verisimilitude that he might not have attained by relying more heavily on computers. And composer Howard Shore's score is perfectly wed to the visuals, being alternately bombastic and delicate, as circumstances dictate.

Leaving Middle Earth, Jackson is now headed for Skull Island and a remake of King Kong that already has me excited. He has not ruled out a return to this fantasy world - he would like to make The Hobbit with some of the same actors, if the complicated rights issues surrounding the prequel can be straightened out. In the meantime, he has given us a trilogy of films to savor and remember. The Lord of the Rings will go down in cinematic lore as a milestone. It has legitimatized fantasy like no other production and has shown that it is possible for studio executives to realize huge gains when taking huge risks. (Had The Lord of the Rings failed, New Line Cinema would have gone down with it.) History will show the importance of The Lord of the Rings. The present illustrates its broad appeal and undeniable critical and commercial success. For many, the release of The Return of the King is the event of the year. And this is one time when the product is good enough to weather the storm of hype. This ring is golden.
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CinemaBlendMay 6, 2015
According to the calendar, Christmas is December 25. According to the movie release schedule, it's December 17. There can be no greater gift for a movie lover than the one bestowed upon audiences by Peter Jackson, whose The Lord of the Rings:According to the calendar, Christmas is December 25. According to the movie release schedule, it's December 17. There can be no greater gift for a movie lover than the one bestowed upon audiences by Peter Jackson, whose The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is not only the best movie of 2003, but the crowning cinematic achievement of the past several years. In fact, labeling this as a "movie" is almost an injustice. This is an experience of epic scope and grandeur, amazing emotional power, and relentless momentum.

One could be forgiven for initially approaching The Return of the King with a little trepidation. As good as the first two films, The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, are (in either their theatrical or extended DVD versions), movie history is littered with occasions when trilogy conclusions have crashed and burned. Return of the Jedi. Godfather III. The Matrix Revolutions. And so on? Yet, with The Return of the King, Jackson has done more than just bucked the trend. Not only is this motion picture an entirely worthy conclusion to the landmark trilogy, but it's better than its predecessors. Somehow, Jackson has managed to synthesize what worked in The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, while siphoning off the less successful elements. The result is amazing. Taken as a whole, there is nothing out there today that can come close to comparing to The Lord of the Rings.

The slowest portions of The Return of the King occur early in the proceedings, as Jackson re-establishes the characters. From there, it's a slow, steady buildup to a rousing climax. The experience is so immersive that I found myself in the middle of the Battle of the Pelennor Fields along with the heroes, rooting for them - even though I knew how things were going to turn out! Along the way, there are moments of genuine pathos that draw a tear from the eye; times of triumph that cause the heart to soar; instances of overwhelming tension that cause the adrenaline to surge; and images of spectacle that make the jaw drop. The pace is unflagging - once Jackson has us, he doesn't let go. When the movie was over, I couldn't believe that 3 1/4 hours had passed.

Although it's unfair to characterize the film as a collection of great moments - the character arcs and overall narrative are too strong for that - it is nevertheless impossible to deny the power of many individual scenes. One of Jackson's most notable contributions is that he directs the film with the intention that certain instances will raise nape hairs. It's the "wow" factor, and it is frequently repeated. Gene Siskel once argued that a great film needs three memorable scenes to go along with no bad ones. The Return of the King exceeds that criteria by a considerable amount.

For those who despise truncated endings, Jackson has a treat in store. The Return of the King ends with a 20 minute epilogue that chronicles events after the War of the Ring, going as much as four years into the future and tying up nearly every possible loose end. The film concludes on exactly the same note as the book (in fact, with the same line), and, while the final chapter of the trilogy is as satisfying as it could possibly be, there's still a vague sense of melancholy when "The End" appears on the screen, because it means that these adventures are over.

Tolkien purists will be as disgruntled with The Return of the King as they were with The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, but this isn't made for them. This is Tolkien's saga as filtered through Jackson's fertile imagination, not some dry, slavishly faithful adaptation (although it is probably as true to the books in both spirit and narrative as any movie version could be). If you want rigorous adherence to the text, wait for the next Harry Potter movie. It's hard to fault the director for many of his choices. There are some omissions in The Return of the King. A couple - Saruman's death at the hands of Wormtongue and the Houses of Healing - were cut due to time constraints, but will appear on the DVD. Another, The Scouring of the Shire, was not filmed. While that may be a viable way to end the book, it is too anticlimactic for a movie, and, as such, is better excised.

The Lord of the Rings will go down in cinematic lore as a milestone. It has legitimatized fantasy like no other production and has shown that it is possible for studio executives to realize huge gains when taking huge risks.

The present illustrates its broad appeal and undeniable critical and commercial success. For many, the release of The Return of the King is the event of the year. And this is one time when the product is good enough to weather the storm of hype. This ring is golden.
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10
MovieManiac83Apr 23, 2015
According to the calendar, Christmas is December 25. According to the movie release schedule, it's December 17. There can be no greater gift for a movie lover than the one bestowed upon audiences by Peter Jackson, whose The Lord of the Rings:According to the calendar, Christmas is December 25. According to the movie release schedule, it's December 17. There can be no greater gift for a movie lover than the one bestowed upon audiences by Peter Jackson, whose The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is not only the best movie of 2003, but the crowning cinematic achievement of the past several years. In fact, labeling this as a "movie" is almost an injustice. This is an experience of epic scope and grandeur, amazing emotional power, and relentless momentum.

One could be forgiven for initially approaching The Return of the King with a little trepidation. As good as the first two films, The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, are (in either their theatrical or extended DVD versions), movie history is littered with occasions when trilogy conclusions have crashed and burned. Return of the Jedi. Godfather III. The Matrix Revolutions. And so on? Yet, with The Return of the King, Jackson has done more than just bucked the trend. Not only is this motion picture an entirely worthy conclusion to the landmark trilogy, but it's better than its predecessors. Somehow, Jackson has managed to synthesize what worked in The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, while siphoning off the less successful elements. The result is amazing. Taken as a whole, there is nothing out there today that can come close to comparing to The Lord of the Rings.

The slowest portions of The Return of the King occur early in the proceedings, as Jackson re-establishes the characters. From there, it's a slow, steady buildup to a rousing climax. The experience is so immersive that I found myself in the middle of the Battle of the Pelennor Fields along with the heroes, rooting for them - even though I knew how things were going to turn out! Along the way, there are moments of genuine pathos that draw a tear from the eye; times of triumph that cause the heart to soar; instances of overwhelming tension that cause the adrenaline to surge; and images of spectacle that make the jaw drop. The pace is unflagging - once Jackson has us, he doesn't let go. When the movie was over, I couldn't believe that 3 1/4 hours had passed.

Although it's unfair to characterize the film as a collection of great moments - the character arcs and overall narrative are too strong for that - it is nevertheless impossible to deny the power of many individual scenes. One of Jackson's most notable contributions is that he directs the film with the intention that certain instances will raise nape hairs. It's the "wow" factor, and it is frequently repeated. Gene Siskel once argued that a great film needs three memorable scenes to go along with no bad ones. The Return of the King exceeds that criteria by a considerable amount.

For those who despise truncated endings, Jackson has a treat in store. The Return of the King ends with a 20 minute epilogue that chronicles events after the War of the Ring, going as much as four years into the future and tying up nearly every possible loose end. The film concludes on exactly the same note as the book (in fact, with the same line), and, while the final chapter of the trilogy is as satisfying as it could possibly be, there's still a vague sense of melancholy when "The End" appears on the screen, because it means that these adventures are over.

The acting shines through more in The Return of the King than in the other films. Elijah Wood is excellent as Frodo, a shell of the cheerful hobbit he once was. Sean Astin transforms Sam into a fierce knight protector, defending his master against the treacherous Gollum, the terrifying Shelob, and the forces of Mordor. Viggo Mortensen gives Aragorn his fullest opportunity to be seen as a three-dimensional hero. Newcomer John Noble, as Denethor, the Protector of Gondor, displays madness laced with cunning. Orlando Bloom and John Rhys-Davies have less to do, but provide us with a little comedic banter as well as some more serious moments. Miranda Otto's Eowen is as sharp and fierce as any man, and far better looking. Billy Boyd and Dominic Monaghan are given a chance to flesh out Pippin and Merry. Cate Blanchett, Liv Tyler, Hugo Weaving, and Ian Holm all make brief appearances.

Expectedly, the special effects set a new standard. The CGI participants of the major battles look more like real combatants than cartoonish computer creations. The locations, set design, and costumes are without flaw. By building many of the elaborate locales, Jackson achieves a sense of verisimilitude that he might not have attained by relying more heavily on computers. And composer Howard Shore's score is perfectly wed to the visuals, being alternately bombastic and delicate, as circumstances dictate.

The Lord of the Rings will go down in cinematic lore as a milestone.
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EddyGregsApr 19, 2015
The saga concludes. Frodo and Sam edge closer to Mount Doom, but the deceitful Gollum plans to lead them into a trap and have the ring for himself. Meanwhile, the armies of Mordor are marching on the Gondorian city of Minas Tirith, whereThe saga concludes. Frodo and Sam edge closer to Mount Doom, but the deceitful Gollum plans to lead them into a trap and have the ring for himself. Meanwhile, the armies of Mordor are marching on the Gondorian city of Minas Tirith, where Gandalf finds Denethor, father of Boromir and Faramir, losing his sanity…

And so all good things come to an end. For three years in a row, Peter Jackson has banished our winter blues with the individual instalments of his Tolkien trilogy, effectively shifting the focus of our cinematic excitement from the summer months to the end of the year. But now that his epic has been unveiled in its entirety, what will be the lasting effects of his achievement?

Well, grand-scale fantasy filmmaking is back on the menu, laying down the gauntlet to George Lucas and Star Wars Episode III. Jackson has also proved that notions of risk and ambition needn't be confined to the low-budget, indie end of the spectrum; nor does California have an exclusive stranglehold on groundbreaking special effects.

The resounding climax to a landmark in cinema history. But the King has now returned, the story is over and the ships are leaving Middle-earth. Ladies and gentlemen, Elvish has left the building.
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EdwardGregoryApr 19, 2015
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. And so all good things come to an end. For three years in a row, Peter Jackson has banished our winter blues with the individual instalments of his Tolkien trilogy, effectively shifting the focus of our cinematic excitement from the summer months to the end of the year. But now that his epic has been unveiled in its entirety, what will be the lasting effects of his achievement?

Well, grand-scale fantasy filmmaking is back on the menu, laying down the gauntlet to George Lucas and Star Wars Episode III. Jackson has also proved that notions of risk and ambition needn't be confined to the low-budget, indie end of the spectrum; nor does California have an exclusive stranglehold on groundbreaking special effects.

And then there's the DVD factor. Just as The Lord Of The Rings was upping the stakes in theatres, so too was its DVD release pattern defining what can (and should) be done on disc for major movies.

In particular, the four-disc extended editions seem to have affected the director's thinking as to what he can get away with in his theatrical final cut. Hence the public grumbles from Christopher Lee about the non-appearance of Saruman in this final instalment. While it might have been fair to grant Lee a curtain call, Jackson quite rightly realises that it is Sauron, not Saruman, whose fiery eye encompasses all the narrative strands of the climax.

The Return Of The King marks the first time in the series when Jackson's roots as a horror filmmaker creep through. As the orcs catapult severed Gondorian heads beyond the walls of Minas Tirith, flesh-rotted ghosts draw swords alongside Aragorn and giant spider Shelob stalks Frodo through dark, web-shrouded tunnels, the film pushes the boundaries of its 12A certificate.

And so it should, because the look and tone must necessarily grow darker as the Hobbits near Mount Doom and Mordor's evil hand grips Middle-earth ever tighter.

Character nuances have been crafted over an unprecedented ten hours-plus of cinematic storytelling: from Strider lurking in the shadowy corner to Aragorn rallying the troops; from Merry and Pippin as bumbling fools to stout-hearted, pint-sized warriors. Only Legolas and Gimli seem to have regressed (in screen time at least) to set-piece archer and comedy sidekick respectively. At least Andy Serkis is rewarded for his Gollum voice work with an early flashback that gets his face on screen, as well as warning us that, under the ring's power, Smeagol can be as murderous as Gollum.

Jackson has kept the momentum of the series rolling on and on though the traditionally 'difficult' middle part and 'weak' finale, delivering a climax to the story that's neater and more affecting than what Tolkien managed on the printed page. Some viewers might feel that the director sprinkles some cheese on his extended coda, adding at least one false ending too many (even if he does ignore the book's Scouring of The Shire).

But those who have walked beside these heroes every step of the way on such a long journey deserve the emotional pay-off as well as the action peaks, and they will be genuinely touched as the final credits roll. Yes, the Ring is dead. Long live King Kong.

The resounding climax to a landmark in cinema history. But the King has now returned, the story is over and the ships are leaving Middle-earth. Ladies and gentlemen, Elvish has left the building.
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10
acaiberryMar 19, 2015
Ladies and Gentleman, this is the fantasy type movie that should be studied again and again. Music, Epic Scenes, Presence of a plot, Acting, and Direction/Detail...you name it and this movie has nailed each category.

The only problem that
Ladies and Gentleman, this is the fantasy type movie that should be studied again and again. Music, Epic Scenes, Presence of a plot, Acting, and Direction/Detail...you name it and this movie has nailed each category.

The only problem that the most hardcore fans have is that they wish it was LONGER. I loved the battle scenes and I felt like I was at a home game cheering for the protagonists of this film. This movie carries a lot of symbolism and metaphors in its plot and this has got to be the most successful film trilogy ever.

Do your ears justice and listen to the soundtrack. GONDOR AND ROHAN THEMES REPRESENT
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wilsoncoolMar 14, 2015
Simply stunning. I have no word to describe this masterpiece. What wrong with this film? Yes nothing, just perfect. I love cinematography, CGI, and original score from this film. Beautiful!!!!!!!!!
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crovieliciousMar 13, 2015
Return of the king is a big climatic and the best of middle earth series, followed by fellowship of the ring in second. And so well deserved oscar best picture 2003. One of the best film of all time.
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10
LOTRfanMar 13, 2015
Magnificent film. The best movie of 21st century so far. I call The Lord Of The Rings trilogy as The Godfather in Fantasy genre. When you see it, you will love it. You can get anything from this film. Love, epic, friendship, sadness and etc.Magnificent film. The best movie of 21st century so far. I call The Lord Of The Rings trilogy as The Godfather in Fantasy genre. When you see it, you will love it. You can get anything from this film. Love, epic, friendship, sadness and etc. My favorite film of all time! Expand
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10
homer4presidentMar 11, 2015
The Return of the King is by FAR the most moving, inspirational and epic of the three parts in Peter Jackon's take on Tolkien's fantasy masterpiece. After proving that this trilogy can carry the weight of a truly enormous body of text withThe Return of the King is by FAR the most moving, inspirational and epic of the three parts in Peter Jackon's take on Tolkien's fantasy masterpiece. After proving that this trilogy can carry the weight of a truly enormous body of text with the Fellowship of the Ring and the Two Towers, Jackson has shown that nothing is impossible anymore when being brought to film, and that fantasy can be surreal, but grounded to reality. Expand
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starwooowMar 8, 2015
i guess people gave this movie rate under 4 or five are pretty retarded and so ridicoulus. this is spectacular film and got many critical acclaimed. the fact saying every element in LOTR are near perfect. music score, script, visual andi guess people gave this movie rate under 4 or five are pretty retarded and so ridicoulus. this is spectacular film and got many critical acclaimed. the fact saying every element in LOTR are near perfect. music score, script, visual and effects, acting, sound, design, cinematography and etc. people with NORMAL brain couldn't gave the lord of the rings so low rating. Expand
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10
andreekaMar 6, 2015
the best film i've ever seen in entire my life. stunning effect and great visual, the music score from howard shore is fu*cking beautiful especiallt concerning hobbits.
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CameraBounceGodFeb 23, 2015
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Because this trilogy has been like a brother to me...I want to tell you all that I felt that frodo shouldn't have had to bear both the spiders name, the earendill and also the fact that sam had a girlfriend and didn't have to carry the ring which galadriel didn't even acknowledge and instead just reminded him that his awesome trip to save the world like bilbo is nothing more than being alone....anyway looking at the cover of the dvd i can tell you now that frodo keeping the ring in the end is exactly like giving earrendil to god in a surreal world.... it seemed like gandolf and the elfs still accepting frodo is a eerily perfect ending even though I loved the deleted scene where they are among the orcs and start a fight and maybe would have preffered that of some of the endingness...like I really didn't care about Sam and his stupid lucky family jeez guys...-JRA Expand
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Brendon6446Feb 4, 2015
This movie is truly my precious. The amount of effort the producers and the director put into this movie is remarkable. Great ending for the best trilogy of all time.
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10
SkyrimGuy935Jan 25, 2015
The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is, in every sense of the word, an epic. The acting is phenomenal, the soundtrack is beautiful, the battle sequences are grand and enthralling with superb visuals, and the story it tells isThe Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is, in every sense of the word, an epic. The acting is phenomenal, the soundtrack is beautiful, the battle sequences are grand and enthralling with superb visuals, and the story it tells is mature, brilliant, and captivating. What took this film to the next level however, is the emotion it manages to convey. You feel an intimate connection which each of the characters, and it leads to multiple moments where you will likely be struggling to hold back tears. Also, the film perfectly capitalizes on profound themes of mortality, friendship, guilt, and loyalty which only intensifies the emotional impact.

As of now, this stands as my favorite movie of all time and is absolutely a 10/10. I also recommend the extended edition, as a few great scenes were unfortunately cut from the theatrical release. Not that it brings down the experience, though.
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LelchelseaJan 19, 2015
Not many movies have ever balanced so many elements to produce such an epic
Lord of the Rings Return of the King was the perfect ending to one of the greatest epics to ever hit the Big screen
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WheelzFourReelzDec 29, 2014
The trilogy ends with the best film, in my opinion. Everything about this movie is done perfectly, like the other previous films, but this movie adds in even more heart, even more action, and even more character development. All thoseThe trilogy ends with the best film, in my opinion. Everything about this movie is done perfectly, like the other previous films, but this movie adds in even more heart, even more action, and even more character development. All those aspects, combined with an ending that made me cry, definitely makes this a shining example of what films should strive to accomplish; an epic in every sense of the word. This is my favorite movie of all time. Expand
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TheApplegnomeDec 9, 2014
A flawless movie that might be one of the best ever made.

Stunning, massive, entertaining, deep and dramatic. Those words truly illustrate how great this last installment of The Lord of the Rings truly is. The high amount of action and the
A flawless movie that might be one of the best ever made.

Stunning, massive, entertaining, deep and dramatic. Those words truly illustrate how great this last installment of The Lord of the Rings truly is. The high amount of action and the uniqueness keeps me entertained. The story is so touching and I the first time I saw this movie I started to cry. The Lord of the Rings trilogy is much about us humans as it is about evil; it shows us that we can live together even though we are different. The extended edition of The Return of the King got much more logical things than the original, even though it’s almost 4,5 hours long. The CGI are in fact in my opinion greater than in The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, but there are some vague practical effects, but I don’t really care because the movie is awesome! The ending in The Return of the King is in level with The Dark Knight Rises and Inception; it's spectacular as it is touching. I totally cried in the ending. It's extremely hard to illustrate my feelings about The Return of the King, because that would only result in an emotional response.

This movie is both dramatic and spectacular.

The Return of the King gets a 10/10.
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OpinionatedDec 5, 2014
Released: 2003
Current year: 2014
Status: STILL enjoy watching this movie. I cannot describe how many times (in what little spare time I have) I have watched the LOTR trilogy with my family. Return of the king, the better film of the
Released: 2003
Current year: 2014
Status: STILL enjoy watching this movie.

I cannot describe how many times (in what little spare time I have) I have watched the LOTR trilogy with my family. Return of the king, the better film of the three will live on in every Tolkien fan's hearts forever. Pure brilliance.
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10
amirreza1Dec 3, 2014
cons :why it was too short. it should be longer. Lord of the rings universe has a lot of space to capture.I m happy about making hobbit in three parts.
Pros: This is simply a masterpiece.
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10
thomasljoguesNov 13, 2014
This is the defining movie of Peter Jackson's career. Though it strayed quite far from the book at times, it worked the miracle of remaining true to the book's spirit and not striving for the random flamboyance that the Hobbit films today fall to.
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10
SythusRATINGSOct 18, 2014
Sauron's forces have laid siege to Minas Tirith, the capital of Gondor, in their efforts to eliminate the race of men. The once-great kingdom, watched over by a fading steward, has never been in more desperate need of its king. But canSauron's forces have laid siege to Minas Tirith, the capital of Gondor, in their efforts to eliminate the race of men. The once-great kingdom, watched over by a fading steward, has never been in more desperate need of its king. But can Aragorn (Mortensen) answer the call of his heritage and become what he was born to be? In no small measure, the fate of Middle-earth rests on his broad shoulders. Expand
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10
BlueSky8642Sep 5, 2014
Is this the most epic finale in movie history? Lord Of The Rings: Return of the King does everything right, making for a massively entertaining and moving film that completes Peter Jackson's Kiwi-made trilogy. You will be left teary-eyed byIs this the most epic finale in movie history? Lord Of The Rings: Return of the King does everything right, making for a massively entertaining and moving film that completes Peter Jackson's Kiwi-made trilogy. You will be left teary-eyed by the ending, from a combination of heart-wrenching emotion and the ungodly 3 hour 20 minute viewing time (4 hours 22 minutes for the extended version). Expand
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10
beingryanjudeAug 24, 2014
It is no small feat to perfectly tie together an extraordinary trilogy. The Return of the King is, perhaps, the most passionate of all three. There is a reason why the Oscars awarded this film Best Picture... it is a masterpiece.
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10
MethosTRAug 16, 2014
Arguably one of the greatest fantasy movies of all time. Peter Jackson conducted a master-stroke of cinema that managed to captivate an entire generation. With this movie and its prequels, Tolkien's magnum opus has become the definitiveArguably one of the greatest fantasy movies of all time. Peter Jackson conducted a master-stroke of cinema that managed to captivate an entire generation. With this movie and its prequels, Tolkien's magnum opus has become the definitive fantasy legendarium that others aspire to.

But.

Return of the King is not THE perfect movie. There are some flaws in it, albeit minor, that detract from the experience and may dismay hardcore LOTR fans.

None of these flaws lie in the production or direction in and of itself, but rather some continuity issues and some questionable additions and omission of some material from the books.

However, only one flaw is really worth mentioning, and that is the inclusion of the Army of the Dead in the Battle of Pelennor. This move conveys the notion that PJ sought to sway people who either didn't care about LOTR or fantasy in general, or simply to add cinematic flair and "awesomeness" to the movie.

An understandable move, for sure. But this scene may leave some hardcore fans dissatisfied with the experience. However, I myself wasn't put off by the scene itself, as it served the purpose of ending the battle and ushering in the conclusion of the movie. Again, understandable, considering the fact that an entire book had to have been "crammed" into a ~210 minute-long movie.

In general though, I was immensely satisfied with the movie and its prequels. Return of the King will be immortalized as one of the greatest movies of all time, and I doubt that this feat will be replicated in the future.

I give The Return of the King a score of 10, despite the minor flaws I mentioned above. They were not enough to detract from my wonderful experience with the movie.
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10
SpangleJul 17, 2014
Just absolutely marvelous. It takes what made its predecessors so amazing and added more amazing on top of it. The acting is great as usual, the battle sequences are masterfully filmed, and the film just really beautiful all around. The CGI,Just absolutely marvelous. It takes what made its predecessors so amazing and added more amazing on top of it. The acting is great as usual, the battle sequences are masterfully filmed, and the film just really beautiful all around. The CGI, the story, the cinematography, just brilliantly done. Also, as with the first two, the film watching experience is entirely magical. It really wisks you away to another land and engulfs you in the happenings as if it is happening in your world. It is hard to put my finger on what makes this series so great, but I think we get a taste of it at the end as even when this film, the final in the trilogy, ended I was left wanting more. Over three hours was simply not enough of Frodo, Sam, Aragorn, Gandalf, etc, for me, which is an amazing thing to say. As for the ending, it is great, though it does go on a tad too long for my liking and is not as great as the rest of the film, but it works and it is pretty satisfying. The Lord of the Rings is one of the rare film franchises that gets better as it goes on, though that is not to say the first two are bad, as they are just as good as this one. I am sad now that is over, but I guess that is to be expected. Expand
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10
shpreaJul 14, 2014
I'm pretty sure this is the longest movie I have ever seen. I watched the extended addition, and I'm guessing that it was around four and a half hours. But wow was it worth it.
Everything about this movie is spot on, grand, and epic. The
I'm pretty sure this is the longest movie I have ever seen. I watched the extended addition, and I'm guessing that it was around four and a half hours. But wow was it worth it.
Everything about this movie is spot on, grand, and epic. The battles, the journey, and the stakes are greater than ever. I was so entertained through the whole thing that I lost track of time, and the four hours just flew by.
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10
oxanaMay 20, 2014
This film was massive; although "The Two Towers" had a great battle at Helm's Deep, the fight that takes place before Minas Tirith is massive on another scale entirely.

We have finally met all our heroes, and it is time to get all the
This film was massive; although "The Two Towers" had a great battle at Helm's Deep, the fight that takes place before Minas Tirith is massive on another scale entirely.

We have finally met all our heroes, and it is time to get all the pieces really moving.

Frodo and Sam, guided by Gollum/Sméagol continue their journey to Mordor, now choosing another road that seems to be even more perilous than the first.

In the meanwhile, Gandalf tries to find out where Sauron will strike next now that Saruman has been defeated, and all signs point towards Gondor.

The fight scenes are incredible to watch. Men, Elf and Dwarf alike are put to test to see who will emerge victorious in the end. The slight sparks of humor in the midst of action only make it better. May the best Dwarf win!

The attention to details in clothes, weapons and cities remains the same all thorough the series - something a viewer takes for granted at least the first few times. The score is beautiful and fitting.

Since this concludes the trilogy, we are handed a rather long ending (with several "fake" endings). After a long movie, it starts to feel a bit drawn out, yet it is a fitting end for the Fellowship.

It is hard to write a worthy review for a movie you love so much. Again, I thought they pushed too much of Arwen in random, short shots into the movie, but that was so that the audience would not forget about her... and Liv Tyler is pretty to look at, so let's forgive them for the slight disruption of balance. Also, I am still amused about the moving spotlight that Sauron's Eye is. Just saying.

Once again, if you have a chance to get your hands on the extended edition, do that; lots of extra goodies there.
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10
MibekriMay 17, 2014
An absolutely brilliant movie, in all aspects. The CG, the set pieces, the acting, everything is amazing. But when the movie is over, you dont remember the gimmicks and embellishments as much as you remember the incredible amount of heart inAn absolutely brilliant movie, in all aspects. The CG, the set pieces, the acting, everything is amazing. But when the movie is over, you dont remember the gimmicks and embellishments as much as you remember the incredible amount of heart in this movie.

Unlike most movies in the fantasy genre, this movie doesnt rely on effects and hundreds of effects to amaze. Even though this movie has all you could want in these aspects, it also has a vibrant, ever present soul, and this is what makes it one of the best movies ever made, and probably the greatest fantasy or epic ever made
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9
AaronWasserman2May 5, 2014
The trilogy has been building to this finale! and it does deliver! at over 3 hours ROTK never seems to make the audience loose interest. the action is better then ever, the characters are put in parell and when you watch this film you have toThe trilogy has been building to this finale! and it does deliver! at over 3 hours ROTK never seems to make the audience loose interest. the action is better then ever, the characters are put in parell and when you watch this film you have to go all the way through because it holds you down and wont let you leave Expand
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10
adronator98Apr 3, 2014
No other movie (other then the 2 prequels) even come close to being as brilliant as this masterpiece. The dialogue, the music, the visual effects, acting, everything in this movie is 100% perfect and that's an understatement. Nothing can everNo other movie (other then the 2 prequels) even come close to being as brilliant as this masterpiece. The dialogue, the music, the visual effects, acting, everything in this movie is 100% perfect and that's an understatement. Nothing can ever take its place of best movie ever made (imo). Expand
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10
Mordovan89Mar 2, 2014
Epic, the best film of 2003. Peter Jackson created a masterpiece with great music and the biggest battle I've seen in a movie. 10 and deserves the truth.
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10
Jayson97Mar 2, 2014
Amazing movie with tons and tons of actors who make it one of their best performances. Truly an incredible story with cutting-edge technology used for 'creatures' like Gollum or the Nazgul.
Peter Jackson did a great job making this movie.
Amazing movie with tons and tons of actors who make it one of their best performances. Truly an incredible story with cutting-edge technology used for 'creatures' like Gollum or the Nazgul.
Peter Jackson did a great job making this movie.
Of course, there are a few bits and pieces missing, especially when comparing them to the books Tolkien made. But a curmudgeon that cares about that.
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8
MovieGuysFeb 2, 2014
Middle Earth fans will be pleased by this, as well as the other installments in the series. Not being a Middle Earth fan myself, I still found myself amazed by the spectacular visuals, the great special effects, and the captivating story.
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8
JpJuarioJan 24, 2014
''Classic.'' EPIC!'' ''Dazzling.'' A Massive motion picture.'' ''Unreachable achievement.'' ''A Masterpiece.'' Peter Jackson is a Master of Big-budgeted Films- A Master of his craft. The Lord of the Rings Trilogy is nearly The Greatest Film''Classic.'' EPIC!'' ''Dazzling.'' A Massive motion picture.'' ''Unreachable achievement.'' ''A Masterpiece.'' Peter Jackson is a Master of Big-budgeted Films- A Master of his craft. The Lord of the Rings Trilogy is nearly The Greatest Film ever made. Expand
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10
XMagnetoJan 5, 2014
I just recently watched this the first time in my life and I got to say it is now one of my favorite movies and now im obsessed with the lord of the rings
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9
sanyrubDec 8, 2013
Could not have imagined a better ending for this trilogy. The better paced one among the 3, not one single filler moment. Action great as always, visuals great as always, excitement in overload mode because we know we are getting to the end.Could not have imagined a better ending for this trilogy. The better paced one among the 3, not one single filler moment. Action great as always, visuals great as always, excitement in overload mode because we know we are getting to the end. Emotional content on point. It has everything, and more. The last hour is just superb. Like I said in my reviews for the other 2 parts, despite everything epic in this trilogy, the heart of the film are Frodo and Sam. That´s beautiful, and even hair-raising in that final hour. I mean, I´m sure Sam was Frodo´s boyfriend for crying out loud! lol Sam had to get a girl at the end just to follow the outdated rules of society No, seriously, it´s amazingly epic and emotive at the same time. Very few times achieved in a film. I can´t give it a 10 because there are very few perfect things in this life and I´m hard when it comes to reviewing. But it has to be the strongest 9 I´ve ever given. Expand
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10
OfficialDec 6, 2013
"LOTR: The Return of the King", the last installment in the series, is also by far, the best in the series too. The emotional depth that has been put in this epic finale is tremendously effective. The extended edition, at 263 minutes, is"LOTR: The Return of the King", the last installment in the series, is also by far, the best in the series too. The emotional depth that has been put in this epic finale is tremendously effective. The extended edition, at 263 minutes, is absolutely brilliant. The action is exhilarating, the acting is powerful, and is fantastically staged. This movie is one of the greatest masterpieces ever made in movie history. Expand
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10
SwatiDec 4, 2013
For Jackson to shoot The Lord of the Rings with a local crew in New Zealand, a country at the edge of the world with little stake in its doings, is a marvel which may only be repeated by Jackson himself. Apart from the international cast, theFor Jackson to shoot The Lord of the Rings with a local crew in New Zealand, a country at the edge of the world with little stake in its doings, is a marvel which may only be repeated by Jackson himself. Apart from the international cast, the people who were actually working to bring us the trilogy, like special effects, were Kiwis. The majority of this credit must go to Jackson for his leadership and vision, and for succeeding in hiring an able team.

The Return of the King is the concluding chapter in the trilogy. The story is picked up where it was left off at the end of The Two Towers. We are shown a glimpse into Gollum's past. The rest of the fellowship reunite at Isengard. Saruman's fate is omitted from the theatrical edition, which I always found odd given his importance in the previous instalment.

It is a time for festivities in Rohan in the wake of the victory at Helm's Deep. An accident shows us Sauron's plans for Minas Tirith, the legendary capital of Gondor. The fellowship breaks again in a different way. Gandalf rides to the city to find the steward reluctant to lift even a finger for its defence. Needless to say, things work out and Rohirrim ride for Gondor's aid. Faramir, dejected by his father, rides out in a last ditched effort to reclaim Osgiliath.

A family heirloom is returned to Aragorn which he uses to find help in the most unexpected places. Another plot device if you ask me. If you keep an eye out for them, they become very obvious. Jackson could have lessened its impact or omitted it entirely, making sure the battle was won through the prowess of battle commanders, which he failed to do so. As Fellowship never purported to show us a huge battle at all, and did not have to resolve it, I will forever hold it in higher regard than Return. The Two Towers resolved its battle much more satisfactorily, but Return has got much more on the former in other areas, so the second place goes to the latter.

Orcs begin the attack on the city. Gandalf leads the defence. The battle looks grander than the one at Helm's Deep, the besieging armies and weapons more awe-inspiring. The special effects used to bring this conflict to life were stunning_ showing the destruction of architecture by the catapults and the loss of men and Orcs; as well as bringing to life Shelob, the giant spider. The scene of the Rohirrim cutting through the Orcs on their horses is possibly the most spectacular. Oliphaunts and Nazguls join the fight.

My previous apathy for Eowyn is cured after watching the extended version, in which she develops significantly. In fact, she is the only female character in Middle Earth who is of some worth, and I like where her story took us, climaxing in a very satisfactory way in the middle of a battle, pitted against only the most important antagonists.

The main trio_ Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli, are absent from much of the fighting, as the other two accompany the former on his journey of self-discovery. I was earnestly hoping for them to join the fight, which they did (Legolas displaying some very impressive killer moves), but it was so ridiculously short. Four minutes. Believe me, I counted. In this regard The Two Towers was much better, as well as having more memorable scenes with the Gollum.

Frodo's inevitable clash with Gollum goes full circle. Sam displays unprecedented strength of character and resolve, and the Hobbits thrive without much help from men. Men ride once more to aid Frodo in his quest to rid them of the ring, and a final battle sequence follows, after which it is destroyed. In epilogue, we learn about the fates of the Hobbits, Aragorn and Gandalf.

The extended edition had some interesting scenes which enriched the characters and the story, but also some which betrayed some ineptitude at editing. One scene had a character utter the exact same dialogue to persuade someone in the span of a single conversation. Surely a rewording would have been more effective. I scoffed at a particular attempt to blossom an affair between two secondary characters. Such things should have been hinted at in the epilogue. No one is interested in that stuff when the stakes involve the end of the world.

Finally, a discussion about the extraordinary tally at the Oscars. Eleven well-deserved wins out of as many nominations, in fields as diverse as art direction, costume design, make-up, sound, original score, original song, editing, visual effects, adapted screenplay, directing, and Best Picture.

In the end I would observe that the extended editions of the first and second instalments, three hours twenty and three hours thirty-three minutes respectively, enhanced the tales while the third one, a crushing four hours, did not achieve anything of worth.
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10
ForeverFallingDec 1, 2013
An immensely fantastic piece of cinema and art. Peter Jackson's brilliant final film in the brilliant Rings trilogy. One of (if not the) best trilogies of all time and this is personally my favourite movie of all time. Literally everything isAn immensely fantastic piece of cinema and art. Peter Jackson's brilliant final film in the brilliant Rings trilogy. One of (if not the) best trilogies of all time and this is personally my favourite movie of all time. Literally everything is top notch, from the voice acting, to the special effects, to the action, to the beautiful scenery. Mesmerizing to the very end and remember, this movie released back in 2003 and it is leaps and bounds better than half of the junk that comes out now! Once again, the negative reviews and scores are from moronic fools that have the attention spans of a soggy loaf of bread. Even though it has tons of insane actions sequences, war scenes, etc, some of these people STILL got bored. Obviously they wanted it to be non stop action with explosions every second. Sorry, this isn't a Michael Bay movie. Expand
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10
cag11Nov 25, 2013
Man, this was the best movie based from a book, ever. Although it is really long, it still has its acting, story, and battle scenes that make this one as one of the best ever made.
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10
GetOuttaTownNov 22, 2013
My favorite film and film series of all time. I first saw this movie when I was 8 years old, and though I couldn't completely follow the plot, I really loved the action scenes and all the other things 8-year-old boys love about movies. As IMy favorite film and film series of all time. I first saw this movie when I was 8 years old, and though I couldn't completely follow the plot, I really loved the action scenes and all the other things 8-year-old boys love about movies. As I grew older and watched it more times, my love for Return of the King only grew as I began to understand it. Now, I own the extended trilogy on blu-ray, and I watch the series every Christmas: a tradition I plan to keep through the years. Thank you, Lord of the Rings, for many great memories. Expand
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10
SSJ2GohanNov 12, 2013
Bem, isto o seguinte, este um bom filme mas venho aqui principalmente pa dizer que quero tudo no caralho. brasileiros sao uma merda assim como os pretos, coisa positiva nos filmes que nao há nem uma coisa nem outra.
aproveito para dizer
Bem, isto o seguinte, este um bom filme mas venho aqui principalmente pa dizer que quero tudo no caralho. brasileiros sao uma merda assim como os pretos, coisa positiva nos filmes que nao há nem uma coisa nem outra.
aproveito para dizer que o pedro mendes da escola eped um lábio de preto, assim como o joao felicio moreira.
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10
joao1198pedroOct 27, 2013
the last film of the epic trilogy the lord of the rings is the best one,althought is one of the longest films ever made with 3hours and 30minutes.absolutely a movie that enters in top 10 of the best films of this century.
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10
pkrippermachineOct 19, 2013
Every part of this movie was amazing, I watch this all the time, and I love it every time I watch it. I love how through this movie series you are with all the characters journey the whole time.
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10
StevenFOct 2, 2013
The final chapter in the groundbreaking trilogy can only be described in epic fashion as a satisfying conclusion, it maintains all the drama, battle, interest, fright and fantasy that its predecessors held, but still manages to inject moreThe final chapter in the groundbreaking trilogy can only be described in epic fashion as a satisfying conclusion, it maintains all the drama, battle, interest, fright and fantasy that its predecessors held, but still manages to inject more life into the story with many twists and turns to feel a sense of despair that's its now over. Saying that, at the time of writing this, The Hobbit trilogy is obviously in full swing, but it's a prequel, so this technically is the end. Just when we thought there was a silver lining after the events of the Two Towers, the battle of Helms Deep was mesmerising yet tragic, but a victory was in toe, yet as we kick off Return of the King, we realise that was only the tip of the iceberg, as Gandalf (Ian McKellan), King Theodin (Bernard Hill), Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen), Legolas (Orlando Bloom) and Gimli (John Rys-Davies) continue their quest to stop the powerful Sauron, who is changing the very landscape of Middle Earth. Aragorn again plays a pivotal part in the finale, attempting to take back a throne that is rightfully his, Mortensen excellently shows so much development of his character over the three films, always fighting the good fight while looking out for those who matter most, now in the midst of leading a rebellion against Mordor. But the real journey still soldiers on with Frodo (Elijah Wood) as he edges ever closer to Mordor, but the ring continues to overburden him, alienating his only friend, Sam (Sean Astin), who can't seem to do right, he continuously warns his friend of the threat of Gollum (Andy Serkis), who has a more expansive role here, we see his humble beginnings as one of the river folk, with his eventual descent into madness well documented. These three must take a secret passage into flaming city in the hope of destroying the ring. What also comes to mind is that these
Frodo and company haven't seen any of the original Fellowship since the first film, they aren't aware that Gandalf is alive, but Gandalf himself now knows that the hobbits are still around, we get the sense of hope from his face that they were indeed around only days before. Almost every scene in the film proves significant, they all feel like closing moments of a long-running show, each character we have come to know over the films have very important roles to play in how the war will pan out, even the accidental travellers of Merry (Dominic Monaghan) and Pippin (Billy Boyd), who proved more than useful in the fall of Saruman (Christopher Lee). We also have most visually spectacular of the three, the massive battle scenes on the edges of Mordor are some of the finest elements of the film, one of the smaller charges against the enemy comes to mind as we are treated to a beautiful medley from Pippin as many soldiers ride to their likely death. In terms of the ending, it really should have decided on one, but the film, or entire saga for that matter, has been such an achievement in special effects, writing, direction and acting, the muddled endings can be forgiven, for the crowing battle of Minas Tirith is a wonderful piece of cinema, combining real set pieces with spectacular effects seamlessly, it just works so well. Many will argue the ridiculousness of such a tale as this story comes into full play, debating whether they pack the emotional punch or relevancy of other masterful pieces, but take a look at how much an audience loves to get lost in a supernatural or fantasy world, and why shouldn't they? There is so much to relate to with these characters and the journey they have taken and where it will go, something we can do as well. It speaks volumes when we choose to separate from big bad out there to seek solitude in a riveting adventure, one which Middle Earth will always hold, there will probably be nothing quite like it again.
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10
genericusenameSep 21, 2013
Very well done. Great acting, great writing, great directing, great effects. This is the rare movie that I have no real complaints about. I understand it may be a bit long for some, but it's easily one of the best movies I've seen.
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10
JohnnyStephensAug 31, 2013
The third chapter of the trilogy is much better than the first two and of course the action is much much better. It's epic and awesome. Congratulations to Peter Jackson!
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10
jbb9601Aug 30, 2013
This is one of my favorite movies of all time. It serves as a greatly satisfying ending to the trilogy with a lot of great moments. Also, people need to shut up about the long ending.
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10
Apple12Aug 27, 2013
This is one of the best movies I've ever seen, epic. Even if you're not a fan of fantasy films, you're definitely going to love this one! It lasts for more than 3 hours, but you'll enjoy every minute of it.
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9
kubathereviewerJul 24, 2013
This movie pushes cinema history to the limit. The battle scenes are stunning as always and so is the acting. I also like how this movie focuses more on Aragorn. The best possible ending to a trilogy.
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10
JmsbppJul 16, 2013
Una de las mejores peliculas de todos los tiempos, excelente tema, actuaciones, efectos visuales y obviamente un epico final predecible pero aun no tapa el gran trabajo de todo este equipo, agradezco por este gran film.
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10
DibbHansenJul 14, 2013
I really enjoyed the epic and emotional complexity of the entire film. While the ending may seem overly long (at over 3 hours, that is a bit excessive), but the film is brought to a conclusion that is magical and satisfying. I enjoyed theI really enjoyed the epic and emotional complexity of the entire film. While the ending may seem overly long (at over 3 hours, that is a bit excessive), but the film is brought to a conclusion that is magical and satisfying. I enjoyed the action, the visuals, the script, the music and the acting. This is a great fantasy film that will live on forever. Expand
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10
Trev29Jun 11, 2013
Words will never be enough to describe this movie. You must see and feel this movie to understand the absolute perfection it portrays. No other piece of film will ever compare to it.
3 of 4 users found this helpful31
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10
drewgreat45678May 25, 2013
This Film was absolutely amazing! Everything was spectacular in it. With superb acting from Sir Ian Mckellen, Viggo Mortensen, Bernard Hill and Andy Serkis, along with amazing special effects, pitch-perfect story telling and so much emotionalThis Film was absolutely amazing! Everything was spectacular in it. With superb acting from Sir Ian Mckellen, Viggo Mortensen, Bernard Hill and Andy Serkis, along with amazing special effects, pitch-perfect story telling and so much emotional scenes, you have got one of the best films of all time. It was so precious. Tolkien was possibly a master of books, but Peter Jackson is a cinema GOD. Expand
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10
ScorpionMay 19, 2013
The beginning is may seem a little fast, playing various information to the public, but the rest is perfect, and ends in a phenomenal trilogy Peter Jacson, besides revolutionize the industry of special effects, it proves that it has specialThe beginning is may seem a little fast, playing various information to the public, but the rest is perfect, and ends in a phenomenal trilogy Peter Jacson, besides revolutionize the industry of special effects, it proves that it has special effects like mixing first and an epic story in a single film. Expand
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7
mds03Apr 15, 2013
What's good about this final film in the franchise is that it's action scenes, script, direction, and the ending all work fine. The last hour of it was especially entertaining and intense. Like the first film in the franchise, almostWhat's good about this final film in the franchise is that it's action scenes, script, direction, and the ending all work fine. The last hour of it was especially entertaining and intense. Like the first film in the franchise, almost everything works except for the runtime and probably something else. I mean come on, a 201 minute runtime. It feels like I could run a marathon of 100 miles and the movie would still have 30 minutes left when I got back home!!!!!!!!!! The other problem is that the camera shifts far too many times and far too fast between Frodo's group and The Fellowship while the movie is going. The camera will show the Fellowship fighting off the bad guys for 30 minutes and then shift to Frodo, Sam, and Gollum's point of view for barely 5 minutes!!!!!!!!!!!! It's still good but it has almost the same exact problems as the first two. Expand
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10
forestvilleMar 23, 2013
A truly epic and beautiful end to one of the most incredible stories made ​​in the history of mankind.
Chapter of interpretations, the best over the trilogy is Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn, and Ian McKellen in the role of Gandalf. A hitherto
A truly epic and beautiful end to one of the most incredible stories made ​​in the history of mankind.
Chapter of interpretations, the best over the trilogy is Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn, and Ian McKellen in the role of Gandalf. A hitherto unknown actress who does very well is Miranda Otto, who plays Eowyn. Transmits tenderness, nobility and courage in equal measure, as a new Krimilda. The sequence in which defends the King Théoden Witch King of Angmar is superb, especially when you cut the head to evil beast. The Nazgul are beautifully created, it must be said. That has been one of the best performances of Jackson.
Ultimately, the greatest achievement is that Peter Jackson has managed to recreate the atmosphere right hand novels in both locations (New Zealand was a fortunate choice) and the characterization of the beings who inhabit Middle Earth. I'm sure Tolkien would be proud to see how it has adapted its unfading work.
One of the best films of the decade 2000.
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2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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10
CaestusMar 4, 2013
Its the awesome final to a awesome trilogy and tops even its two predecessor. I lost myself in the film, when I was watching it. The best in the trilogy and one of the best films to be ever made.
3 of 3 users found this helpful30
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9
JamesCannonFeb 16, 2013
Act ionized version of the great book. Where Tolkien merely mentions of violence, Jackson expands upon it but with excellent results. He also expands on the roles of some of the characters, none the less its quiet awesome to see thisAct ionized version of the great book. Where Tolkien merely mentions of violence, Jackson expands upon it but with excellent results. He also expands on the roles of some of the characters, none the less its quiet awesome to see this unfold. It is a first of its a kind, a fully realized fantasy movie that delivers in every sense of the word. The themes are all there, the cast is great, and the sweeping score is amazing to the battle scenes that arise. When I saw this in the theatre in 2003 I couldn't believe what I was seeing on the screen. Expand
3 of 4 users found this helpful31
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10
Rob7309Feb 8, 2013
Everything about this movie is perfect and that is why it is my all time favorite film. It is epic in every sense of the word and is truly a great ending to one of, if not the best film series ever.
2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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10
BreakingBradJan 27, 2013
The Lord of the Rings trilogy is the greatest trilogy of films ever made, and this is one of the finest examples of brilliant filmmaking of all time. Peter Jackson is an incredible visionary, the cast is great, it adapts the book very well,The Lord of the Rings trilogy is the greatest trilogy of films ever made, and this is one of the finest examples of brilliant filmmaking of all time. Peter Jackson is an incredible visionary, the cast is great, it adapts the book very well, and it all adds up to one of the best films ever made. Expand
3 of 3 users found this helpful30
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10
WiesyJan 17, 2013
An epic movie with an epic end. Love this movie.
2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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8
JacobJan 12, 2013
There is so much you could say about this film but I am going to keep it brief. Return of the King is a great film and possibly one of if not the best film adaptation of a book I have ever seen. It cuts stuff out to keep the plot moving andThere is so much you could say about this film but I am going to keep it brief. Return of the King is a great film and possibly one of if not the best film adaptation of a book I have ever seen. It cuts stuff out to keep the plot moving and the stuff that Expand
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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10
21DaHoagie12Jan 8, 2013
All the people who don't like this movie are either bitter, childish harry bladder fans or they're just so miserable, so critical and just such pathetic human beings that they refuse to be entertained by anything...
2 of 3 users found this helpful21
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9
Compi24Jan 4, 2013
Rounding off a trilogy on the right note is no easy task, but Peter Jackson and co. pull it off with ease in this third and final installment of their adaptation of the classic Tolkien tale - it's bursting with marvelous set pieces,Rounding off a trilogy on the right note is no easy task, but Peter Jackson and co. pull it off with ease in this third and final installment of their adaptation of the classic Tolkien tale - it's bursting with marvelous set pieces, heart-wrenchingly emotional drama, and that same plethora of charming characters that rightfully bring it all home. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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8
ZegilgameshDec 28, 2012
Though the ending is padded a bit, it is still another brilliant Lord of the Rings adaptation,and will forever stand as an example of quality big-budget cinema with impeccable acting and a satisfying climax.
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9
WhiteTalpaDec 27, 2012
An epic ending to one of the best trilogy ever made. Some of the best battles I've seen in a film. LOTR The Return of the King is a real masterpiece.
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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10
TheGamer31Dec 25, 2012
This is by far one of my most favorite movies of all time. Great actors, special effects, a great script and a lot of great characters that are easy to remember, and you will never forget them.
2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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10
csw12Dec 22, 2012
The miracle is that 'The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is better: tighter, smarter, funnier the previous 2 and that is saying a lot. Peter Jackson has created some of the greatest films ever made for the movie screen. TotalThe miracle is that 'The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is better: tighter, smarter, funnier the previous 2 and that is saying a lot. Peter Jackson has created some of the greatest films ever made for the movie screen. Total perfection in every aspect it takes to make a movie. This is an astonishing achievement in movie making. An epic masterpiece of total perfection that will leave you amazed. Expand
5 of 6 users found this helpful51
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10
RyMintzDec 20, 2012
Quite possibly the most satisfying and epic conclusion to an already perfect trilogy, the Return of the King is a testament to both the genius of the filmmakers and the original author J.R.R. Tolkien. It blends seamlessly with the FellowshipQuite possibly the most satisfying and epic conclusion to an already perfect trilogy, the Return of the King is a testament to both the genius of the filmmakers and the original author J.R.R. Tolkien. It blends seamlessly with the Fellowship of the Ring and the Two Towers to create the journey and story that , and yet stands on its own as a masterpiece, a masterful piece of cinema that will endure till the end of days. Its visual grandeur, cinematographic excellence, musical dexterity, haunting narrative, and ultimate perfection coalesce to create a tale, unlimited in emotional richness, that will resonate through the ages. Every viewing of the film for me is a journey in and of itself, one that ultimately ends in tears (I hear Gandalf lamenting right now "I will not say do not weep, for not all tears are an evil"). I fondly recall the midnight premiere of film and how, when I looked around at the audience during the Grey Havens scene, there was not a dry eye in the house, including my father who has (forgive me for the clicheness ) the emotional range of a teaspoon. If that isn't evidence for the profound emotionality of the film, then I don't know what is. Little scenes throughout the film as well elicited such powerful reactions from the audience I couldn't help but feel even more emotion because of that. The Ride of the Rohirrim, Aragorn's speech, Gandalf and Pippin's moment during the Siege of Minas Tirith, and many other scenes throughout the film, whether they induced goosebumps or tears, created an energy in the theatre that was both palpable and moving. Once the text "The End" appeared on screen, there was a moment of silence, and then an uproar of applause and cheering. Once again, brought to tears. In any case, the Return of the King is and will ever be a Goliath among films, and I cannot imagine that a film will ever be made that will come to dwarf a film such as this. Expand
4 of 4 users found this helpful40
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10
ale3930Dec 18, 2012
Wow, it is an amazing film. It's not boring. I loved it. It has all the things a perfect movie needs, conclusion: it is epic, see it it is worth your time!
2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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10
tomymgDec 16, 2012
This is simply a masterpiece.
You will never see a trilogy like this one, essential for your cinematographic culture. The Return of the King is the prove that third parts can be much better than the first or second one.
17 of 18 users found this helpful171
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8
EssenceOfSugarDec 15, 2012
With surprisingly better pace than its predecessor, The Return Of The King provides a graceful and majestic yet thrilling end to the trilogy that is Lord Of The Rings. I almost cried.
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10
Prodigy4132Dec 14, 2012
After watching the movie I was 100% sure this one is the best movie out of them all. Nothing here could be done better, everything was perfect. The story, the music, the scenery, everything was done as if god sent Tolkien and Jackson and toldAfter watching the movie I was 100% sure this one is the best movie out of them all. Nothing here could be done better, everything was perfect. The story, the music, the scenery, everything was done as if god sent Tolkien and Jackson and told them to do their job. I didn't read the books, it's a shame, I know, but only because I'm a lazy person (I love reading books) and when I wanted to start, I noticed my dog ate the first 200 pages. But even when I know it's a movie and I didn't read the books, I can see what Tolkien did there, what he made, created, when he did it (In the 30's, 40's and 50's making something that advanced and fantastic, could be called genius, because for something like this you need inspiration and where did Tolkien get it?) and how. If not for Tolkien and Jackson the world of books and movies would be much different. Expand
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