The People I've Slept With Image
Metascore
45

Mixed or average reviews - based on 7 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: The People I've Slept With - a promiscuous woman who finds herself with an unplanned pregnancy and needs to figure out who the baby daddy is...NOW. Angela Yang loves sex. She loves it so much she needs to make baseball cards of her lovers to help her remember where she's been. She doesn't think twice about her lifestyle until she finds out that she's pregnant. Her gay best friend, Gabriel Lugo tells her to "take care of it," but her conservative sister, Juliet persuades Angela to get married to the baby's father and lead a "normal" life like her. Angela listens to her sister, chooses to keep the baby, and goes on a quest to find the identity of the father by any means necessary. Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 7
  2. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. Reviewed by: G. Allen Johnson
    75
    Eventually, Angela comes to understand that it is she who is being reborn. Dare we call it a "grow-mance"?
  2. Reviewed by: Richard Kuipers
    70
    A little too well behaved at times, but zips along nicely when its raunchier elements kick in.
  3. Lee's young actors shine with talent and personality, but the film's gravitas lies in the wisdom and insight of Angela's loving father, so beautifully played by the distinguished veteran James Shigeta.
  4. A raunchy romantic comedy that, like its heroine, rarely has both feet on the ground.
  5. 40
    (It) notably liberated itself from the fusty tradition that a sex comedy should either titillate or tickle an audience.
  6. Largely devoid of the sex-farce style comic wit to which it aspires, the film is palatable largely because of the charm of lead actress Cheung.
  7. Reviewed by: Andrew Schenker
    40
    The gallery of eccentric ex-lovers provides a few yuks, but the fact that the film's trajectory sees going from sexuality-owning independence to conventional respectability as a quantum leap is remarkably depressing, even if Angela's final resolve complicates such an easy progression.