Metascore
59

Mixed or average reviews - based on 33 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 20 out of 33
  2. Negative: 2 out of 33
  1. Reviewed by: David Ehrlich
    Apr 9, 2014
    30
    The Railway Man is such a safe, respectful portrait of true-life catharsis that it feels afraid to reopen the same old wounds it exalts Lomax for confronting.
  2. Reviewed by: Kyle Smith
    Apr 10, 2014
    25
    I think I’d rather have the waterboarding than the movie’s bromides about how we’re all victims and hate must end.
User Score
7.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 33 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 14
  2. Negative: 1 out of 14
  1. Aug 22, 2014
    10
    War is hell. The worst part about it is the lies that are told to justify the war itself and the cruelty that comes as a consequence.War is hell. The worst part about it is the lies that are told to justify the war itself and the cruelty that comes as a consequence. Railway Man tells a part of the story of World War II that is rarely told through the eyes of a British officer that exemplified the suffering and humiliation endured by the British that were left to surrender to the Japanese at Singapore. It tells the story of two men who find a way to bring closure and find forgiveness and reconciliation. It also tells of a love story of a woman who wouldn't give up until her husband was healed. Full Review »
  2. Aug 5, 2014
    10
    What a fantastic film with a twist .. and then based on a real life scenario.

    It took a long time for the Japanese to officially say sorry
    What a fantastic film with a twist .. and then based on a real life scenario.

    It took a long time for the Japanese to officially say sorry to those who fought the forgotten war in the far east and I cant imagine what they went through or how they survived (those that did).

    Well worth a viewing
    Full Review »
  3. Jun 23, 2014
    8
    An autobiographical novel adapted movie that partially covers the story of two distinct eras. One, from the recent time England and anotherAn autobiographical novel adapted movie that partially covers the story of two distinct eras. One, from the recent time England and another from Thailand during the second world war. About a young man who was in the British army and his sufferings when the British empire of southeast Asia was captured by the Japanese imperial army.

    An ex army officer, Eric, by chance meets a strange woman, Patti, on a train journey. The encounter changes their lives forever. Until one day Patti finds abnormality in Eric's behaviour during the sleep. She learns some unbearable secrets during unearthing about his past life. So the screenplay too switches back to the few decades earlier when Eric was a soldier working in Singapore. And it reveals everything he and his men went through during being in the prisoners of war.

    ‘‘Sometime the hating has to stop’’

    Colin Firth's role was limited. He appeared in the opening and the end few minutes. In his presence, he was excellent, like always. Also looked perfect for the role in that getup. The romance portion that commits in the earlier part of the movie went meaningless once the other story begins to take full control. It also includes Nicole Kidman in the unnecessary cast list to see her in a tiny role. It begins to swap the actors, the young version of Colin's role played by a young actor from 'War Horse' was another brilliant performance throw.

    The movie had a little flaw, I mean a drag during the last quarter. The scene where old enemies meet were in fact good, but should have been better. Other than that the message was good relating the words 'foe' and 'revenge'. Actually, it is hard to believe in a true story like this, but anyway it happened. It was almost historical accuracy that I came to know from the BBC's quote. It is another reason why this story deserved to be a movie. With the great star casts and crew it became a fine movie.

    7.5/10
    Full Review »