DreamWorks Distribution | Release Date: March 18, 2005
2.8
USER SCORE
Generally unfavorable reviews based on 146 Ratings
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90
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MovieMasterEddyApr 3, 2016
"The Ring Two" is the inevitable sequel to "The Ring," which, in turn, was a remake of the wildly influential Japanese horror flick "Ringu." Released in 1998, "Ringu" spawned several other films and turned its director, Hideo Nakata, into an"The Ring Two" is the inevitable sequel to "The Ring," which, in turn, was a remake of the wildly influential Japanese horror flick "Ringu." Released in 1998, "Ringu" spawned several other films and turned its director, Hideo Nakata, into an international brand. It was only a matter of time before Mr. Nakata went Hollywood, and so he has at last as the director of, yes, "The Ring Two," the sequel to the remake of his original hit. (Got that?) Such creative cannibalism is of course part of the pleasure of genre movies, especially horror, where directors like Wes Craven ("Scream") and Takashi Shimizu ("The Grudge") return to the scene of the crime to scare up new frights and profits.

Good horror, like George Romero's zombie trilogy, works by balancing the reassuringly familiar with the totally unknown: it's like getting tossed in the air as a kid: you shriek with a mixture of pleasure and fear, and then after you safely land, beg for it to happen again (and again). Sustaining that balance is tough, however, and even the most muscular directors soon grow weary repeating the same old tricks. Mr. Nakata has either become tired of the "Ring" premise - a murdered girl haunts and hunts those unlucky enough to watch her on videotape - or something went seriously awry during production. Whatever the case, despite Mr. Nakata's track record and the radiant presence of its star, Naomi Watts, "The Ring Two" is a dud.

Once again, Ms. Watts plays Rachel Keller, a journalist and a single mom to a young son, Aidan (David Dorfman), recently relocated from Seattle to a small coastal town in Oregon. In the first movie, Rachel successfully escaped the marauding ghost in the machine and now thinks she has entered a new chapter. No such luck; she is actually mucking about on a slag heap of recycled scares, dumb lines and predictable entanglements, including some static with a potential boyfriend replacement (Simon Baker), an encounter with a guest star meant to lend either giggles or gravitas to the proceedings (Sissy Spacek in a fright wig) and a handful of disposable bit players. Once again, blood pools, water flows and the ghost comes calling through the magic of video, scaring to death anyone foolish enough not to have made the move to DVD.

The mercurially talented Ms. Watts had to endure an unfair share of humiliation on her road from obscurity, including stinkers like "Tank Girl" and a host of similarly forgettable fare. Since her breakout appearance in David Lynch's "Mulholland Drive" four years ago, she has followed the now standard trajectory that finds certain higher-profile screen actors methodically alternating between nominally independent boutique items, like "21 Grams," which helped lift Ms. Watts's serious-film profile, and bigger-budget, high-concept entertainments like "The Ring," which are meant to show that she can hold the larger-stakes screen and do the mainstream thing without selling out her talent. Or so the Hollywood thinking seems to go.

When this formula pans out, you have a career like that of Ms. Watts's friend Nicole Kidman. When it does not, well, the hall of studio shame is lined with glossies of performers permanently stalled by the usual tabloid woes and too many wrong choices. One of Ms. Watts's current projects is Peter Jackson's remake of "King Kong," and while the real star of that show will be the special effects, the movie should help secure Ms. Watts pop-movie credibility. By the time "King Kong" opens, "The Ring Two" will have rotated to the DVD bargain bin. Meanwhile, here's hoping her handlers begin exhibiting as much prudence as Rachel Keller does in her fight against evil; an actress in Hollywood has a preciously short shelf life, and you can't build a brilliant career with expired goods.
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3
MovieManiac83Apr 23, 2015
As far as I'm concerned, it's official: Hollywood has lost the art of how to make horror films. Consider this year's entries as Exhibit A - everything from White Noise to The Ring 2 has been horrible. There's not a worthwhile film in theAs far as I'm concerned, it's official: Hollywood has lost the art of how to make horror films. Consider this year's entries as Exhibit A - everything from White Noise to The Ring 2 has been horrible. There's not a worthwhile film in the bunch. And nowadays, it has become popular to remake incoherent Japanese ghost stories into less cogent English-language versions. The Ring and The Grudge are prime examples of this kind of bankrupt storytelling philosophy. Give me Halloween, A Nightmare on Elm Street, or The Shining any day.

I was not a fan of the American edition of The Ring. It did too little with an intriguing premise, offered a confusing and often dumb storyline, and was low on the creepiness scale. But compared to its successor, The Ring was pure genius. The Ring 2 is slickly made garbage - a dull, plodding horror movie that ventures into the realm of idiocy when it isn't busy remaking the first film. This is yet another example of what happens when money, not creativity, drives the production of a sequel. Despite its flaws, The Ring worked as a self-contained story. Opening it up for a second installment is a mistake. The evidence is on the screen.

If you're expecting scares from The Ring 2, you will be disappointed. Except for a few half-hearted "boo!" moments, this film has little to offer that will raise the nape hairs. The horror, to the extent that it can be called by that word, is standard, by-the-book stuff that has been neutered in order to appeal to a PG-13 crowd. It's stale. Even the one potentially edgy aspect of the movie ends up being blunted to the point where it couldn't cut butter. And, because The Ring 2 doesn't have a clear idea of where it's going, its rules and restrictions regarding the ghost and her behavior are arbitrary.

With the exception of an opening sequence that echoes that of The Ring, the most intriguing element of the first movie - that watching a video tape can result in a death sentence - is eliminated. Maybe the reason for this is that the VCR is fast becoming obsolete, joining the 8-track deck and the record player in garage sales. Can a DVD have ghostly beings encoded on it? Although The Ring 2 doesn't do much with videotapes, it offers something new: Bambi run amok. Watch and see why it's a good idea to allow hunters to thin the herd.

Naomi Watts and David Dorfman have the thankless jobs of reprising their roles as Rachel and Aidan Keller. Everyone else from The Ring gets this film off. Replacements include Elizabeth Perkins as a psychologist, Simon Baker as a reporter, and Sissy Spacek as Carrie 35 years older (or something like that). None of these secondary characters comes close to growing a personality, but that's pretty much true of the leads as well. We identify with Rachel and her son because we have known them longer.

In many ways, the film's production history is more interesting than the resulting movie. After Gore Verbinski (director of The Ring) decided he would rather go chasing pirates than try on a second Ring, the producers approached Hideo Nakata, who made both Ringu (the Japanese original) and Ringu 2 (the Japanese sequel). However, while The Ring was a remake of Ringu, The Ring 2 has nothing to do with Ringu 2. So this means Nakata got a chance to make two different first sequels. At least he can't claim that someone else messed up the American version of his franchise. He did it all by himself.
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dferrisOct 21, 2005
All I have to say is "deer scene" I have never laughed so hard in my life. Not to say that the rest of the film could even salvage this horrible film, but that scene in particular was so lame that I had to show all of my friends...they all All I have to say is "deer scene" I have never laughed so hard in my life. Not to say that the rest of the film could even salvage this horrible film, but that scene in particular was so lame that I had to show all of my friends...they all hate me now. Expand
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carlosOct 10, 2005
One star for not naming everyone in the credits Alan Smithee. You have to earn the other nine by making something at least marginally watchable. This is an hour and fifty one minutes of my life that I will never get back. Hideo Nakata, I One star for not naming everyone in the credits Alan Smithee. You have to earn the other nine by making something at least marginally watchable. This is an hour and fifty one minutes of my life that I will never get back. Hideo Nakata, I hold you responsible. Expand
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AndyW.Oct 4, 2005
What's that? Did she just tried to kill her child with cocaine? And a group of deer just attacked the car? Oh wait a second, I know why this is happening. Oh I get it! Because it's meant to be the worst horror movie of all time. What's that? Did she just tried to kill her child with cocaine? And a group of deer just attacked the car? Oh wait a second, I know why this is happening. Oh I get it! Because it's meant to be the worst horror movie of all time. Wow, I've never thought of that. Hmmm Expand
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3
NickHAug 28, 2005
I'll say it now: "Damn you Ehren Kruger". I've never laughed at a bad horror movie before. Why? Because I'm always bored during them. And this my friends, is a BAD one. But, I encourage you to rent it for a laugh. This movie I'll say it now: "Damn you Ehren Kruger". I've never laughed at a bad horror movie before. Why? Because I'm always bored during them. And this my friends, is a BAD one. But, I encourage you to rent it for a laugh. This movie is funnier than some of the so-called comedies Hollywood is throwing out. This is the FIRST horror movie I've ever laughed during, there's nothing scary about it whatsoever. Well... there may have been something towards the end that may have inspired fear in some people - but I was too giddy from laughing at the deer scene (I swear I was in tears) and the toliet scene. The so called scares were not scares at all, they were 'jump tactics' (i.e. Samara grabs someones arm). I also found humor in the fact that whenever Hideo Nakata wanted to show drama he whipped the camera around in a circle. Powerful? No. I was not impressed by his direction at all. The effects were also overdone and came off as silly excuses to spend money. The acting, if you can call it that, was just so... so... bleh. Thats the word. This whole movie can be discribed as "bleh." You'll find yourself discribing it to people as "bleh" before you tell them how much you laughed during that deer scene. This movie is really that funny, but it's not scary which is what it set out to be. For that, it gets a lowly.... ===3.3/10=== Expand
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2
bobb.Aug 27, 2005
Pros: Acting. Cons: Makes absolutely no sense. overview: DO NOT WATCH THIS FILM!!!
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tylercAug 26, 2005
There is nothing entertaining about this movie. Would someone please explain to me the scene with the deer? I didn't get it. There is nothing scary about this move and I have no idea how they got Sissy Spacek to play a cameo.
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