Metascore
95

Universal acclaim - based on 42 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 41 out of 42
  2. Negative: 0 out of 42
  1. The film comes down to a mesmerizing portrait of a man who in any other age would perhaps be deemed nuts or useless, but in the Internet age has this mental agility to transform an idea into an empire.
  2. Reviewed by: Bob Mondello
    100
    Terrific entertainment - an unlikely thriller that makes business ethics, class distinctions and intellectual-property arguments sexy, that zips through two hours quicker than you can say "relationship status," and that'll likely fascinate pretty much anyone not named Zuckerberg.
  3. 100
    David Fincher's film has the rare quality of being not only as smart as its brilliant hero, but in the same way. It is cocksure, impatient, cold, exciting and instinctively perceptive.
  4. 100
    Delivers the heady, rib-tickling rush of an action picture, and it gradually builds to an emotional wallop that blindsides you.
  5. 100
    Quite possibly the first truly great fact-based movie of the 21st century.
  6. Most of all, it is the improbably entertaining story of how new media are altering the very nature of courtship and friendship.
  7. But make no mistake, whether the movie is fair or horribly unfair - I know nothing of the actual facts and can't make that determination - its portrait of Zuckerberg is a hatchet job of epic and perhaps lasting proportions.
  8. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    100
    The film owes much of its success to the inspired pairing of Fincher and Sorkin.
  9. 100
    The Social Network has understandably been compared to "Citizen Kane" in its depiction of a man who changes society through bending an emergent technology to his will.
  10. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    100
    On the level of craft, the movie's just absurdly enjoyable. Sorkin's dialogue dazzles; the photography is burnished and sleek; the editing confidently sorts out a complex narrative.
  11. David Fincher obsesses about obsessive people.
  12. 100
    The performances, direction and writing of one of the best pictures of 2010 make this Social Network every bit as addictive, and a little chilling as well.
  13. The result is a ripped-from-the-Zeitgeist film that is razor-sharp, an astute and funny portrait of the early 2000s, with all its LOL's, its IMO's and its WTF's. Mostly its WTF's.
  14. A film that's at once timely and timeless.
  15. 100
    Keep your eyes on Garfield - he's shatteringly good, the soul of a film that might otherwise be without one. The Social Network is the movie of the year. But Fincher and Sorkin triumph by taking it further. Lacing their scathing wit with an aching sadness, they define the dark irony of the past decade.
  16. A work deeper than its nickname, "The Facebook Movie," hints at - coils around your brain. Weeks after seeing it, moments from it will haunt you.
  17. It's one of the best movies of the year, one of the best entries ever in the Way We Live Now oeuvre.
  18. It's a grandly entertaining reminder of everything we used to go to the movies for (and still can't get online): sparkling dialogue, thorny situations, soulful performances, and an unusually open-ended and relevant engagement with a major social issue of the day: how we (dis)connect.
  19. 100
    With a thieves den of borderline-Shakespearian characters, a wickedly literate screenplay, potent direction by David Fincher, an exceptional ensemble cast and subject matter that speaks to a generation and well beyond, The Social Network is mesmerizing.
  20. The power of The Social Network is that Zuckerberg is a weasel with a mission that can never be dismissed. The movie suggests that he may have built his ambivalence about human connection into Facebook's very DNA. That's what makes him a jerk-hero for our time.
  21. 100
    Shot to shot, scene to scene, The Social Network nearly never puts a foot wrong or, really, does anything to make you feel less than compelled.
  22. 100
    This is a remarkable film for more reasons than its antihero, from the cyberspeed wisdom of Aaron Sorkin's screenplay to Jeff Cronenweth's camera prowling the excesses of youthful genius gone wild.
  23. 100
    Smartly written by Aaron Sorkin, directed to within an inch of its life by David Fincher and anchored by a perfectly pitched performance by Jesse Eisenberg, The Social Network is a barn-burner of a tale that unfolds at a splendid clip.
  24. Reviewed by: Richard Corliss
    100
    The rewards for paying attention are mammoth and exhilarating. This is a high-IQ movie that gives viewers an IQ high.
  25. Reviewed by: Justin Chang
    100
    Continues Fincher's fascinating transition from genre filmmaker extraordinaire to indelible chronicler of our times.
  26. This account of Facebook's founder, and of the website's explosive growth, quickly lifts you to a state of exhilaration, and pretty much keeps you there for two hours.
  27. 100
    Brilliantly entertaining and emotionally wrenching.
  28. 100
    The founding of Facebook becomes a tale for our times in this masterful social drama.
  29. 95
    Fincher and his screenwriter, TV writer-god Aaron Sorkin, have made a seemingly modest picture that achieves something close to greatness the old-fashioned, slow-burning way: By telling a story with faces, dialogue and body language of all types, from awkward to swaggering.
  30. 91
    Zuckerberg's story ends up feeling bigger than his own life.
  31. 90
    All I can say about Timberlake's performance as the thoroughly odious, desperately seductive, textbook-case metrosexual Parker is that he brings so much reptilian fun that he unbalances the movie, almost fatally.
  32. When Mr. Eisenberg makes Mark's face go blank, the character seems scarily emptied out: it's a subtly great, at times unsettling, performance.
  33. Blisteringly entertaining.
  34. Is director David Fincher's film the stuff of greatness? Not quite. But the picture is very, very good.
  35. 88
    Eisenberg, one of those young actors who has existed just below the radar for several years now (he was the lead in both "Zombieland" and "Adventureland," not to be confused with one another), deserves an Oscar for this dead-on portrayal of a temperamental genius.
  36. It has the staccato wit of a drawing-room comedy, the fatal flaw of a tragic romance and the buzzy immediacy of a front-page headline, all powered by a kinetic engine typically found in an action flick. And that's just the opening scene.
  37. The problem is, the geek in question, at least as Jesse Eisenberg plays him, doesn't have the emotional expansiveness to fill out a movie. Perhaps sensing this, the filmmakers play out the story line from multiple points of view and crowd the stage with a pageant of voluble supporting characters.
  38. Reviewed by: Damon Wise
    80
    A rich, understated character drama that gleefully exposes the petty playground politics at the centre of one of the internet-era's most bitter court cases.
  39. Reviewed by: Dana Stevens
    80
    The Social Network wants to be a social satire, a miniaturist comedy of manners, and a Greek tragedy; it bites off a lot, at times more than it can chew. But even the unmasticated morsels are pretty tasty.
  40. 75
    This film transcends its trendy, obvious limitations with enough vitality and vitriol to make it as informative and breathless as it is entertaining.
  41. 70
    Corny as that is, the film's nadir comes when Zuckerberg's pretty young lawyer comforts him (or us) with the mealy-mouthed observation, "You're not an asshole, Mark. You're just trying so hard to be one."
  42. It's an entertainingly cynical small movie. Aaron Sorkin's dialogue tumbles out so fast it's as if the characters want their brains to keep pace with their processors; they talk like they keyboard, like Fincher directs, with no time for niceties.
User Score
8.2

Universal acclaim- based on 1338 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 21 out of 324
  1. Oct 4, 2010
    2
    Talk, talk, talk, snarky comment repeat. Socially inept rich kids whining about wanting more money and recognition. Unlikeable characters and absolutely no drama. I spent two hours waiting for the movie to begin and it never did. Simply an awful movie going exprerience. Full Review »
  2. Oct 1, 2010
    10
    "The Social Network" was so good I don't even know where to begin. I can't, for the life of me, think of another film in recent years that's left me so wholeheartedly satisfied by the time the credits started rolling. This is some amazing, amazing stuff we've got here folks: don't miss it for the world. Full Review »
  3. Oct 1, 2010
    5
    Just saw this offering in a nearly empty theater in Naples, FL - another sign of the age of the population here. Anyway, the dialog is great - especially the opening scene - BUT unfortunately... it...continues - and the reason the dialog isn't great after a while is that it GRATES. By the end of the show I was convinced that the hero is nothing better than a high-achieving pain-in-the-Asperger and the great cinematography, directing, acting, realism, etc. was a waste of skills. It's a movie done in by its protagonist. Full Review »