New Yorker Films | Release Date: October 26, 2001
7.3
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 4 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
3
Mixed:
0
Negative:
1
WATCH NOW
Buy On
Review this movie
VOTE NOW
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Check box if your review contains spoilers 0 characters (5000 max)
7
ChadS.Nov 14, 2005
If the mother is going to turn tricks, why doesn't she use that money towards rehab rather than shoot her daughter up with drugs? Michele(Ariane Ascaride) clearly loves Fiona(Julie-Marie Parmentier) but her judgment is even more If the mother is going to turn tricks, why doesn't she use that money towards rehab rather than shoot her daughter up with drugs? Michele(Ariane Ascaride) clearly loves Fiona(Julie-Marie Parmentier) but her judgment is even more haphazard than the mother played by Holly Hunter in "Thirteen". In a film with multiple storylines, equal, or close to equal time should be spent on each narrative. In comparison to the cabbie's and the aforementioned mother with a junkie daughter's story, the music teacher and ex-convict's affair seems hardly there. It's sketchy, as is the narrative of the ultra-right organization, which makes this ambitious film a little more than uneven. Still, "The Town is Quiet" has its moments. Gerard's reason for giving Michele the drugs surprises us when we learn their shared history. And even though Paul(Jean-Pierre Darroussin) was raised by liberal parents, the cab driver takes full advantage of a foreign couple on holiday. Paul is basically a nice guy, which prevents "The Town is Quiet" from the interesting possibility of Paul joining the nationalist movement to avenge his revoked license. This route might've been a more graceful way to intergrate the ultra-conservatives with another story. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful