Metascore
75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 36 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 32 out of 36
  2. Negative: 1 out of 36
  1. Reviewed by: Nikola Grozdanovic
    Aug 13, 2014
    100
    By the time the curtains draw to a bittersweet close, you’ll walk out feeling rejuvenated, satisfied, well replenished in humor and culture, and already planning your own trip to Italy.
  2. Reviewed by: Chris Nashawaty
    Aug 13, 2014
    91
    While this sequel lacks the novelty of the first course, it's just as soulful and silly.
  3. Reviewed by: Betsy Sharkey
    Aug 14, 2014
    90
    Brydon and Coogan's discourse over breakfast, lunch and dinner is captured with a casualness that makes the eavesdropping delicious.
  4. Reviewed by: John DeFore
    Jan 27, 2014
    90
    As funny as the first go-round, more beautiful to look at, and better conceived.
  5. Reviewed by: Scott Foundas
    Jan 27, 2014
    90
    Now and then, Winterbottom nudges the movie in the direction of narrative... But even when it’s just ambling about, The Trip to Italy casts a warm, enveloping spell.
  6. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    Aug 28, 2014
    88
    If The Trip to Italy begins shakily, it ends with expansive bliss, a father and son reconnecting off the shores of Capri as Gustav Mahler’s art song “Ich Bin Der Welt Abhanden Gekommen (I Am Lost to the World)” sends everyone heart-stoppingly home.
  7. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Aug 28, 2014
    88
    He’s like a globe-trotting Richard Linklater. And with Winterbottom’s first-ever sequel, his “Trip” films now rival Linklater’s “Before” series in charting how a twosome evolves over time. Plus, they’re bloody hilarious.
  8. Reviewed by: Glenn Kenny
    Aug 14, 2014
    88
    If you go in for allusive British humor that builds slowly from dry to uproarious, as executed by two absolute masters of the form, The Trip To Italy will work for you, I believe. I also think the film, directed, like the prior one, by the astute Michael Winterbottom, is a somewhat smoother trip than the first.
  9. 88
    A leg up on the first “Trip,” an altogether more delightful vacation with two blokes who might wear us and each other out along the way. But then, that’s half the fun.
  10. Reviewed by: Lawrence Toppman
    Sep 25, 2014
    83
    Winterbottom has darkened the tone: The final scene takes place during a golden sunset that brings no closure to either man.
  11. Reviewed by: Marc Mohan
    Aug 28, 2014
    83
    A second helping of a satisfying dish.
  12. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Aug 22, 2014
    83
    Michael Winterbottom, who also directed “The Trip,” is known for his avant-garde cinematic ways, but with these films he wisely sets down the camera and for the most part lets the actors play out their improvs.
  13. Reviewed by: Alonso Duralde
    Aug 14, 2014
    82
    Winterbottom and cinematographer James Clarke use the gloss of both food porn and travel porn to occasionally distract us from the darker elements of the story, in the same way that Coogan and Brydon will turn to humor to lighten up their roiling inner conflicts. In this case, however, both the sugar coating and the bitter pill are a treat.
  14. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Aug 27, 2014
    80
    Not a lot happens, other than eating between small bits of drama and large doses of humor. If you saw the first film, you know how good that can be.
  15. Reviewed by: David Denby
    Aug 25, 2014
    80
    They also try to one-up each other as men, vying for professional success and for the attention of the invariably lovely women they meet. Sharks have duller teeth than Coogan and Brydon. Both movies, in fact, are about the impossibility — and the necessity — of male friendship.
  16. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Aug 21, 2014
    80
    Any movie with these two comics is a trip and a half. How about France for the next one? A perfect way to revisit Michael Caine.
  17. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    Aug 18, 2014
    80
    I am not the first to make this joke, but The Trip to Italy may live up to the “Godfather: Part II” analogy, at least insofar as it’s better and tighter than its predecessor.
  18. Reviewed by: Bob Mondello
    Aug 16, 2014
    80
    What's not fictional in their Trip to Italy is the gorgeous Italian coastline director Michael Winterbottom has them romping through, or the food they barely notice (though it'll have you famished by film's end), or the yacht they commandeer, bellowing all the while ...
  19. Reviewed by: Stephanie Zacharek
    Aug 12, 2014
    80
    Now we know just what to expect from Coogan and Brydon, although as long as you're willing to settle in for the ride, that's not necessarily a bad thing.
  20. Reviewed by: Joshua Rothkopf
    Jan 27, 2014
    80
    The real richness of the movie, though, comes well in, as the improvised script gets around to deeper anxieties of aging and avoidance.
  21. Reviewed by: William Goss
    Jan 27, 2014
    79
    The Trip to Italy is plenty enjoyable for fans of the first one and these two, but by the end, it also has the consistency of reheated comfort food.
  22. Reviewed by: Steve Davis
    Aug 27, 2014
    78
    By the end of this affable little film, you’ll likely crave a bowl of fresh-made pasta in seafood sauce, a glass of Frascati, and a room with a view on the Amalfi coast. (Sigh.)
  23. Reviewed by: Steven Rea
    Aug 29, 2014
    75
    The Trip to Italy doesn't feel entirely new, but there's comfort in familiarity, too. And as Brydon and Coogan note in one discourse, it's the rare sequel (The Godfather: Part II) that's better than its forebear.
  24. Reviewed by: Liam Lacey
    Aug 14, 2014
    75
    Is The Trip to Italy the second Godfather of comedies, or a retread? Neither, exactly. The concept is no longer fresh, but the scenery on the Amalfi and Sorrento coasts is more transporting, and their convertible Mini Cooper is a more amusing vehicle. Finally, the fact that the only singalong CD for the drive is Alanis Morissette’s 1995 album Jagged Little Pill is an unexpected master stroke.
  25. Reviewed by: Matthew Kassel
    Aug 14, 2014
    75
    It’s "Sideways" meets "My Dinner With Andre" — a low-key, sensual affair punctuated by off-the-cuff moments of brilliant wit and wordplay — and the result is delectable.
  26. Reviewed by: Manohla Dargis
    Aug 14, 2014
    70
    Like its predecessor, The Trip to Italy flirts with seriousness yet invariably, perhaps rightly, it always goes for the joke, the pun, the fun and the sun.
  27. 70
    As befits its settings, The Trip to Italy aims higher than its predecessor — maybe too high — and isn’t as fresh. I enjoyed it, though.
  28. Reviewed by: Nathan Rabin
    Aug 14, 2014
    70
    The film lets audiences be third parties in Coogan and Brydon’s dinner conversation. For lovers of words, comedy, and conversation, that’s an awfully hard proposition to pass up.
  29. Reviewed by: Mike D'Angelo
    Aug 13, 2014
    67
    It works reasonably well as a film, too, though, provided that one isn’t overly bothered by repetition and a general sense of diminishing returns.
  30. Reviewed by: Ann Hornaday
    Aug 28, 2014
    63
    The wine Coogan and Brydon are opening this time may lack some of the novel fizz of the first one, but The Trip to Italy is like most vacations: a few bumps here and there, but over all too quickly.
  31. Reviewed by: Kyle Smith
    Aug 13, 2014
    63
    It’s photographically yummy, heaving with sun-dappled vistas and four-star dining. The boys float around a bit in the sea and enjoy homemade pasta while trundling out their impressions of, say, Marlon Brando.
  32. Reviewed by: Chuck Bowen
    Aug 9, 2014
    63
    Michael Winterbottom and his gifted actors still haven't quite solved the riddle of portraying social disconnection in a manner that's anything other than sporadically involving.
  33. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Aug 14, 2014
    60
    Coogan and Brydon make terrific companions for us partially because, at least as they appear onscreen, they’re so amusingly incompatible themselves.
  34. Reviewed by: Amber Wilkinson
    Jan 27, 2014
    60
    Their improvisation has been honed to the point where the jokes land solidly without losing naturalism.
  35. Reviewed by: Katherine Kilkenny
    Jan 27, 2014
    58
    While The Trip to Italy offers all the pleasures of a posh holiday accompanied by two of the most inventive comedians today, the improvisation here lacks the total unexpectedness that the first enjoyed.
  36. Reviewed by: Mick LaSalle
    Aug 28, 2014
    25
    Film anybody's trip to Italy, and it would be more interesting than this, or at least equally boring.
User Score
4.5

Mixed or average reviews- based on 17 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 10
  2. Negative: 4 out of 10
  1. Sep 19, 2014
    0
    It was two hours of waiting for the movie to start and the two main characters to shut up. Worse movie, I really don't know what the critics are thinking...someone must be buying dinner or something. Terrible movie...don't bother. Full Review »
  2. Sep 19, 2014
    6
    If you saw "The Trip" you know what to expect: Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon reunite for a culinary tour of Italy. The majority of the "action" consists of the two comics bantering (in a car or a restaurant) and doing their impressions (the humorous highlights). The scenery is stunning, but the actual meals get less attention. Of course, it's really about them, so you like their style, you'll find yourself amused. Full Review »
  3. Sep 1, 2014
    0
    Run, don't walk from this movie if you have believed the reviews! Never have I wanted the main characters in a film to just shut up more! They waste beautiful scenery, beautiful food, and beautiful women with their self-absorbed and usually off-key or completely inappropriate badinage. Full Review »