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80

Generally favorable reviews - based on 27 Critics What's this?

User Score
8.5

Universal acclaim- based on 34 Ratings

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  • Summary: The true story of a Bohemian St. Francis and his remarkable relationship with a flock of wild red-and-green parrots. Mark Bittner, a dharma bum, former street musician in San Francisco, falls in with the flock as he searches for meaning in his life, unaware that the wild parrots will bringThe true story of a Bohemian St. Francis and his remarkable relationship with a flock of wild red-and-green parrots. Mark Bittner, a dharma bum, former street musician in San Francisco, falls in with the flock as he searches for meaning in his life, unaware that the wild parrots will bring him everything he needs. (Shadow Distribution) Expand
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 26 out of 27
  2. Negative: 0 out of 27
  1. Reviewed by: Phil Hall
    100
    This is an excellent movie -- by all means, flock to it!
  2. 90
    One of the most beautiful and endearing nature films you've ever seen, despite being filmed almost entirely within a major metropolis, and a love story that will repeatedly reduce you to tears.
  3. Well-considered, beautifully made, and often gripping in its narrative, the film epitomizes the best the documentary format can offer.
  4. This is a charmfest of a movie, for bird lovers and non-bird lovers alike.
  5. Reviewed by: Walter Addiego
    75
    In traditional stories, it's saints, madmen and children who befriend wild animals. Mark Bittner, who pals around with feral creatures in the amiable documentary The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill, is just as much an outsider, though of a different sort.
  6. 75
    It is not the film you think it is going to be. You walk in expecting some kind of North Beach weirdo and his wild-eyed parrot theories, and you walk out still feeling a little melancholy over the plight of Connor.
  7. 60
    Though Bittner's slacker charm may not be to all tastes, the parrots are natural-born scene-stealers with more than enough charm to seduce the most dubious viewer.

See all 27 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 23
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 23
  3. Negative: 0 out of 23
  1. ConnieH.
    May 30, 2007
    10
    Being the owner of a Blue Crowned and White Eyed conure this movie moved me to tears. It showed the individual personalities of each one of Being the owner of a Blue Crowned and White Eyed conure this movie moved me to tears. It showed the individual personalities of each one of these birds. They are so similar to human being in that they love their mates and nuture their young. They truly are intelligent, magnificient creatures. Expand
  2. L.Maier
    Feb 22, 2006
    10
    This movie gives the truest human response to our species as having 'dominion over the animals.' We are here to nuture, to support This movie gives the truest human response to our species as having 'dominion over the animals.' We are here to nuture, to support and to commune with our neighbors of this earth. And, as one who has recently inherited and has been getting to know a parrot, I know Mark knows the deeply gentle spirituality of this species, and the great (and hidden) gift they are to this world. Expand
  3. MarkK.
    Jun 9, 2007
    8
    A nice documentary! Try to push March of the Penguins out for your memory, and you will enjoy it more.
  4. ChadS.
    Aug 22, 2005
    7
    "The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill" might've benefited by a word or two by those "Draconian enviromentalists". We love the pretty "The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill" might've benefited by a word or two by those "Draconian enviromentalists". We love the pretty birds, but if they're doing harm to the native bird population, do you just ignore it because the subject of this sometimes engaging documentary is a nice guy. There's a tremendous irony in Mark Bittner's acknowledgment of the more common local birds towards the end of the film, because it's like he's looking back on his previous incarnation as a "dharma bum", embodied by these birds who blend into the San Francisco landscape without notice. Like the birds, Bittner was anonymous. Now he's more like a parrot. Even though his observations of the native birds plays like the filmmaker's last-ditch effort to appease the conservationists, it doesn't come close to hurting the inspiring human interest story of a Henry Darger-type getting a new lease in life. Expand

See all 23 User Reviews

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