Metascore
75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 47 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 35 out of 47
  2. Negative: 2 out of 47
  1. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    Dec 28, 2013
    100
    This telling of the tale possesses enormous cinematic energy and a killer supporting cast full of hilarious delights.
  2. Reviewed by: Liam Lacey
    Dec 25, 2013
    100
    What keeps the energy percolating is DiCaprio’s performance, in the loosest and most charismatic turn of his career.
  3. Reviewed by: Mick LaSalle
    Dec 25, 2013
    100
    It is the best and most enjoyable American film to be released this year.
  4. Reviewed by: Rene Rodriguez
    Dec 24, 2013
    100
    If it had been a drama, The Wolf of Wall Street might have been unwatchable: There’s simply too much of everything. But Scorsese and screenwriter Terence Winter (The Sopranos, Boardwalk Empire) hit on the genius idea to turn the story into a riotous comedy, one that keeps topping itself everytime you think it can’t possibly get crazier.
  5. Reviewed by: James Berardinelli
    Dec 24, 2013
    100
    The Wolf of Wall Street joins "After Hours" as the most openly comedic films Scorsese has made.
  6. Reviewed by: Betsy Sharkey
    Dec 24, 2013
    100
    A very fast three hours, Wolf is a fascinating, revolting, outlandish, uproarious, exhilarating and exhausting master work on immorality.
  7. Reviewed by: Peter Travers
    Dec 18, 2013
    100
    DiCaprio's swaggering, swinging-dick performance is the wildest damn thing he's ever put onscreen.
  8. Reviewed by: Damon Wise
    Dec 18, 2013
    100
    The oddest thing of all about The Wolf Of Wall Street is also the most unusual for a Scorsese film: it is incredibly, incredibly funny.
  9. Reviewed by: Rex Reed
    Dec 17, 2013
    100
    Sensational entertainment. This $100 million extravaganza is — let’s face it — rampantly over the top. Hell, it’s by Martin Scorsese, who is always over the top.
  10. Reviewed by: Robbie Collin
    Dec 17, 2013
    100
    As hot and wet as freshly butchered meat: every second, every frame of its three-hour running time is virile with a lifetime’s accumulated genius.
  11. Reviewed by: Rob James
    Dec 17, 2013
    100
    A touch too long, yet never slack, at three hours, TWOWS benefits from independent funding, Scorsese’s brass balls and an A-grade cast’s turbulent improvisations to emerge as an epic, boldly broad screwball comedy about the state of America, then and now.
  12. Reviewed by: A.A. Dowd
    Dec 24, 2013
    91
    There’s a cracked logic, a genius almost, to the film’s amped-up irreverence. Maybe laughter isn’t just the best medicine, but the only sensible response to this much brazen amorality.
  13. Reviewed by: Marc Mohan
    Dec 23, 2013
    91
    At a full three hours, the movie flirts with wearing out its welcome about two-thirds through, but recovers to end up an exhausting, operatic black comedy that leaves you wanting more.
  14. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Dec 24, 2013
    90
    Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street is absurd, ridiculous, over the top, overindulgent, overlong, overstuffed, over-everythinged. And that is precisely the point.
  15. Reviewed by: Scott Tobias
    Dec 22, 2013
    90
    Since Belfort and his crew are complete knuckleheads, every bit the low-class slobs who bray like animals on the trading floor, The Wolf Of Wall Street may be the funniest film of 2013, rife with gross misbehavior, pranks, and tomfoolery.
  16. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    Dec 25, 2013
    88
    One of the funniest yet most depressing movies in Martin Scorsese’s long career — a celebration and evisceration of male savagery, financial division. It’s like “GoodFellas,” only (slightly) more legal, which is very much the point.
  17. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Dec 25, 2013
    88
    The most exhilarating film of the year is also the most exhausting.
  18. Reviewed by: Matt Zoller Seitz
    Dec 25, 2013
    88
    Martin Scorsese's The Wolf of Wall Street is abashed and shameless, exciting and exhausting, disgusting and illuminating; it's one of the most entertaining films ever made about loathsome men.
  19. Reviewed by: Richard Roeper
    Dec 23, 2013
    88
    Scorsese tells the Wolf’s story almost strictly from the Wolf’s point of view. We never see his victims. It’s actually an effective technique, because the Wolf certainly never really saw his victims either — not as actual human beings who could be hurt by his financial hocus-pocus.
  20. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    Dec 23, 2013
    88
    It's rambunctious and unruly, but mesmerizing.
  21. Reviewed by: Chris Nashawaty
    Dec 24, 2013
    83
    The feverishly paced film is hell-bent on making the audience feel like they just snorted a Belushian mountain of blow. You can practically feel your teeth grinding to dust. As with any high, though, it also doesn't know when to stop.
  22. Reviewed by: Rodrigo Perez
    Dec 17, 2013
    83
    As an sensory experience, 'WOWS' is mostly a terrifically visceral one, a full throttle fast and furious bacchanalia of drug-fueled madness. But as a scathing indictment of American rapacity, it isn't particularly deep or resonant beyond the exterior.
User Score
7.9

Generally favorable reviews- based on 1275 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 54 out of 294
  1. Dec 25, 2013
    0
    Overrated crap from the most overrated director with the most overrated actor currently working?
    Nah, not really…. I generally love Martin
    Overrated crap from the most overrated director with the most overrated actor currently working?
    Nah, not really…. I generally love Martin Scorsese's films, but this film just didn't have any likable characters and three hours was just too long to spend on characters this repulsive.
    Full Review »
  2. Dec 25, 2013
    10
    In the end, The Wolf of Wall Street is an outrageous and repugnant reflection of something very real and very rotten at the core of ourIn the end, The Wolf of Wall Street is an outrageous and repugnant reflection of something very real and very rotten at the core of our society. Some people will inevitably be so put off by the harsh composition of the message that they fail to heed the importance of that message; but in presenting so much of the bad and the ugly behind Wall Street so unflinchingly, Scorsese has crafted an insightful and important deconstruction of post-millennial America’s moral erosion. These are the barbarians at our gates. Full Review »
  3. Dec 27, 2013
    3
    I don't usually review movies but this one really bothered me and I have to share my thoughts. The Wolf of Wall Street is well written, wellI don't usually review movies but this one really bothered me and I have to share my thoughts. The Wolf of Wall Street is well written, well shot, and clearly well directed overall. The acting is fantastic, especially from Leo He put in one of the best performances I seen in a long time. I have never been so universally approving of how a film was put together yet had such a negative reaction to it.
    I'm a white male and I don't identify as a feminist, but if this film is indicative of the new norm, I may have to start doing so. The misogyny in this film is so unforgiving and goes so unaddressed that it simply cannot just be satire or a cultural mirror. I'm not talking about the hookers either. Repeatedly, women in this film are shown to be unbelievably weak. Sex is their only commodity, beauty is the only thing that matters. When Jack's first wife, with whom he has multiple children, finds him cheating with Naomi, all she can do is cry. We never see her again. She never even mentions their kids! Naomi is worse. Even though she is never presented as anything more than a vapid beauty, she is worshiped. During her most "powerful" scene, the only one where she exerts any kind of force over Jack, she is calling him daddy and giving him blue balls. During the movie, she is completely powerless to address any of Jack's problems with drugs or cheating. We never even see her try. The female lead of the movie is a beautiful accessory and nothing else. All she has to offer him is sex, and she knows it. Even the woman who is ostensibly the most female stockbroker at Jack's firm is weak Jack even gives a teary eyed speech about how she never could have made it if he didn't lend her $25,000 when he gave her the job.
    If the intention of this movie was to wake up people like me, who have probably been watching films like this without batting an eye for years, then Scorcese has succeeded. Many viewers, however, will probably be too taken in by the flashy editing, language, and fantasy to give it a second thought.
    It’s a shame that something this destructive has to come in such a well executed package.
    Full Review »