Metascore
43

Mixed or average reviews - based on 36 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 36
  2. Negative: 9 out of 36
  1. Doggedly, or rather wolfishly, the film doesn't go in for camp or mirth, at least until its misjudged and semi-endless wolf-on-wolf climax.
  2. Del Toro, with his melancholy-brute features, endows this raging beast with some of the ''Why me?'' poignance you may remember from Lon Chaney Jr.'s performance in the original.
  3. 63
    The Wolfman avoids what must have been the temptation to update its famous story. It plants itself securely in period, with a great-looking production set in 1891.
  4. 63
    As a spooky midnight movie, The Wolfman is worth curling up with.
  5. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    63
    The movie is by no means good but it’s surprisingly enjoyable: a misty, moody Saturday-matinee monster-chiller-horror special.
  6. Reviewed by: John DeVore
    63
    Isn’t like a lot of modern horror movies. It’s not about torture, or dead children, or weepy vampires with great hair. It’s an attempt to reinvent the monster movie, which we're all about. It’s too bad it couldn’t have been contemporized. Period movies can so easily become parodies of portentousness, and that’s what happens with this one.
  7. 63
    The matter-of-fact way everybody involved faces this supernatural horror drains most of the chills right out of it.
  8. 63
    But the direction by Joe Johnston (Honey, I Shrunk the Kids) sacrifices originality for computer graphics and stop-motion camera tricks, and the script, by Andrew Kevin Walker and David Self, bulges with real howlers: “I didn’t know you hunted monsters.” “Sometimes monsters hunt you!”
  9. If you're going to pick the werewolf as your favorite monster, there's a lot to appreciate in the shaggy, imperfect but still fun new version of The Wolf Man.
  10. 60
    Benicio Del Toro looks even more like Lon Chaney Sr. than Chaney Jr. did, and he’s a far better actor than the previous Wolf Man.
  11. Reviewed by: Mark Jenkins
    50
    Unfortunately, brutality is about all this update of 1941's The Wolf Man can do well. Mutilations, decapitations and disembowelments are handled with aplomb in the first R-rated film from director Joe Johnston (Jumanji, Jurassic Park III). But everything that doesn't involve gore feels like an afterthought.
  12. Reviewed by: Amy Biancolli
    50
    The movie's best special effect hands down is Anthony Hopkins as Talbot the Elder, who flounces around in a tiger stole and utters his lines with such a delicious madman twinkle you might want to snack on him yourself (ahhh-ROOooh).
  13. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    50
    What emerges is a banal horror film and a tepid action-adventure.
  14. 50
    The root problem with The Wolfman is that it's a hybrid.
  15. Reviewed by: James Adams
    50
    An ill-considered, utterly unnecessary remake of the 1941 pulp classic "The Wolf Man" starring Lon Chaney Jr.
  16. Reviewed by: Joe Holleman
    50
    Falls into that middling ground of horror film: neither scary enough to be exciting nor campy enough to be amusing.
  17. The movie plays like a missed opportunity, with its by-the-numbers scares and a story that feels disjointed, hurried in some places, slow in others.
  18. Reviewed by: Dana Stevens
    50
    Johnston understands everything about old-fashioned werewolf movies except why they were scary.
  19. 50
    This is fairly satisfying, particularly a ghoulish episode in a Victorian insane asylum.
  20. 50
    A few stray livers and severed heads aside, this is a monster too polite for its own good.
  21. Not bad enough to be considered a camp, guilty pleasure, it's more of a dull, defanged dirge with the reliably intriguing Benicio Del Toro and Anthony Hopkins turning in oddly disaffected performances.
  22. Reviewed by: Helen O'Hara
    40
    An uneven tone and the feeling of too many cooks mars the finished product, but there are moments of beauty and real terror.
  23. 40
    There's plenty of doom, gloom, and outright despair on hand here but very little genuine human emotion.
  24. 40
    The Wolfman isn't crazy enough to be fun or multilayered enough to be touching. It's impossible to have any real feeling for this anguished beastie.
  25. Here's the surprise of the new incarnation of The Wolfman, starring Benicio Del Toro -- there isn't one. No bite either, or humor, or camp.
  26. 40
    In this shaggy-dog version the wolfman’s story is both gratuitously bloody and, finally, bloodless.
  27. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    40
    The constant repetition of these shock tactics, in lieu of genuine suspense, makes The Wolfman feel cheap, despite the vast amounts obviously spent on Rick Heinrichs' opulent production design, the extensive visual effects, the more-than-effective special makeup effects, Milena Canonero's luxurious costumes, Danny Elfman's insistent score and the tony cast.
  28. 38
    What have you done to The Wolfman, Hollywood? It’s got no kick to it. No fun either. And no real scares, which is more unforgivable.
  29. The Wolfman feels like a film reedited and reworked so many times it has lost all narrative rhythm and suspense.
  30. Reviewed by: Rick Warner
    38
    It's all too predictable and by the book. Even with a few plot twists that aren't in the original, I was hardly shocked or awed. While it's sleeker and more sophisticated than the Chaney version, this new Wolfman isn't any scarier.
  31. Anthony Hopkins still does elegant menace better than anyone.
  32. 33
    Deeply phony, strangely static, disengaged, flaccid and, quite often, silly, it’s a film that tries to bully you into emotions with flourishes of music, contorted camera angles, screams of special effects, smears of gore, and earnest close-ups of its woefully miscast star.
  33. Reviewed by: Andy Klein
    33
    The Wolfman isn’t scary. In fact, it isn’t much of anything.
  34. 30
    A movie that’s full of sound, fury and unintentional camp -- and is still bafflingly inert.
  35. 25
    Johnston fails to make a story set in 1891 England relevant to contemporary audiences.
  36. Speed can be a virtue, but there’s something extremely off-putting about the way The Wolfman, Universal’s latest horror classic redux, races through its opening scenes.
User Score
5.2

Mixed or average reviews- based on 139 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 27 out of 51
  2. Negative: 15 out of 51
  1. Sep 25, 2011
    7
    "The Wolfman" is a great movie with a dark atmosphere spreading across the screen. It's almost a nostalgic movie with superb cinematography. At least I enjoyed it. Full Review »
  2. Jun 11, 2011
    6
    Upon his return to his father's estate a few years after his mother's death, Lawrence Talbot discovers that his brother's body has been found. Then, he learns that a wolf has killed him and searches for it. One night, the wolf attacks him and bites him, which gives him a curse to transform into a wolf man every full moon and goes on a killing rampage. A young woman and a Scotland Yard inspector must find a way to get get rid of the curse once and for all.

    Saw this in theaters the same month it came out last year and now to make my opinion.

    The Wolfman suffers from its thin plot and undeveloped characters, but has good CGI, gave me a few chills, and even Anthony Hopkins was a lot of fun and it's in no doubt a decent remake of a 1940 movie that I've never even watched.

    6/10
    Full Review »
  3. Aug 13, 2010
    5
    I found mostly all the Universal Studios monsters pretty damn ridiculous. Although there are considered classics I never really found them interesting to watch. When I heard they were making a remake of it I was actually kind of excited. There are not really a lot of good werewolf movies out there. In my opinion the best one is An American Werewolf in London. I was very sadly disappointed. I'm really negative towards remakes I rarely agree with them. I say leave the original alone. My ideal of remakes is that there is not really an artistic tone with them. You'll only remake it for money, just trying to milk the cow. When you are filming a remake you need to understand the things that made the original so good. Then you build your film using the foundation that the original used. Now the foundation of the original Wolf Man movies was the fact that Lon Chaney Jr. use just makeup to scare people now that's freaking feat considering the movie was made in 1941 that's some talent. With some simple makeup he was able to scare a lot of moviegoers. I think that's what the problem is in The Wolf Man of this year. The film begins with Lawrence Talbot (Benicio Del Torro) a stage actor who gets the news that his brother was killed by a wild animal. He decides to go to help his brother's wife Gwen (Emily Blunt) and his father Sir Talbot (Anthony Hopkins) who is a very strange man and always carries a gun. We learn that Talbot has a dark past with his mother who is dead, that torments him and resents his father. One day trying to investigate what happen at gypsies camp the wild animal attacks and bites Talbot and I'm pretty sure you get the rest of what's going to happen. The movie has a very strong plot and the movie is very well acted. I do want to mention Hugo Weaving who plays a Scotland Yard inspector trying to figure out what's going on with the murders. He does a very good job as well. The set direction is amazing, the locations are awesome and the cinematography is very good we feel the dread in every corner. The problem with The Wolf Man is the werewolf itself. While the CGI is great it's very excessive and we feel a how you call it a very computer taste in your mouth. The movie feels lifeless and there are so many better horror movies out there with better looking and realistic special effects. If they really want to give homage to the original they should have toned the CGI. As well as the pace is very bad it was really boring and the script lacked scares and actual suspense. There goes another remake down the drain. Full Review »