Metascore
72

Generally favorable reviews - based on 30 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 25 out of 30
  2. Negative: 1 out of 30
  1. Reviewed by: Lisa Schwarzbaum
    Dec 11, 2010
    100
    Tiny Furniture is proof, against steep odds, that there are no small stories, only small storytellers.
  2. Reviewed by: V.A. Musetto
    Dec 11, 2010
    100
    Whether Tiny Furniture is a mumblecore movie is an open question. It has many of the tell-tale signs of that ill-defined genre; although improvised dialogue, a mumblecore staple, is minimal.
  3. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Dec 7, 2010
    91
    Lena Dunham, the writer-director-star of the microbudget Tiny Furniture, has a distinctive comedic take on the world – a kind of haggard spiritedness.
  4. Reviewed by: Steven Rea
    Dec 17, 2010
    88
    A darkly comic, piercing, and occasionally painful study of a young woman's quest for identity.
  5. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    Dec 9, 2010
    88
    The movie is full, assured and extremely wry.
  6. Reviewed by: Michelle Orange
    Dec 11, 2010
    85
    The complementary tone of droll but freighted psychodrama she strikes in Tiny Furniture feels like a significant but precarious achievement. I feel a pinch of worry for her - as I did for Aura - looking into a future of Rudins and Apatows.
  7. Reviewed by: Henry Barnes
    Mar 29, 2012
    80
    Dunham, who pads through much of this extremely well-written, often funny and very touching film in the semi-nude, doesn't give a damn about any of it.
  8. Reviewed by: David Parkinson
    Mar 26, 2012
    80
    Much-maligned it may be, but the so-called mumblecore movement continues to turn out gems. Lena Dunham's lo-fi, witty treatment of a semi-autobiographical tale adds another dozy to the canon.
  9. Reviewed by: Jamie Graham
    Mar 20, 2012
    80
    Tiny Furniture announces Dunham as a talent to watch.
  10. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Dec 12, 2010
    80
    Pathos isn't Ms. Dunham's bag. What makes her film fascinating is the delicate mood it sustains.
  11. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    Dec 11, 2010
    80
    This is a quirky little comedy, not a film that will change your view of reality or anything, but it's funny, wrenching and sharply observed, with a dispassion that suggests a real artist is at work.
  12. Reviewed by: Bob Mondello
    Dec 11, 2010
    75
    The end result is that Tiny Furniture plays like situation comedy, but with an overlay of performance art.
  13. Reviewed by: Peter Travers
    Dec 11, 2010
    75
    It's the work of a filmmaker with a stunning future.
  14. Reviewed by: Peter Hartlaub
    Dec 9, 2010
    75
    What Dunham lacks in polish, she makes up for in her ability to observe her generation, with the hardest truths coming at her own expense.
  15. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Dec 8, 2010
    75
    It's hard enough for a director to work with actors, but if you're working with your own family in your own house and depicting passive aggression, selfishness and discontent and you produce a film this good, you can direct just about anybody in just about anything.
  16. Reviewed by: Ann Hornaday
    Dec 7, 2010
    75
    A funny, affecting movie about growing up in the shadow of a formidable mom.
  17. Reviewed by: Dana Stevens
    Dec 11, 2010
    70
    Tiny Furniture feels surprisingly assured, even elegant. There are those who will accuse Tiny Furniture of wildly inconsistent tonal shifts, and it is guilty of some, but I appreciated the way this movie kept upending my expectations.
  18. Reviewed by: Manohla Dargis
    Dec 11, 2010
    70
    Tiny Furniture is at times more pleasurable to think about than it is to watch, more of a conceptual coup than an enjoyable experience.
  19. Reviewed by: Joe Leydon
    Dec 11, 2010
    70
    What it doesn't have, to its credit, is a neat conclusion. In the end, the film appears to suggest that Aura likely will feel free to keep searching for herself, repeating mistakes and making new ones, because she has all the time in the world.
  20. Reviewed by: J. Hoberman
    Dec 11, 2010
    70
    A comedy of youthful confusion that gets its kick not only for evoking a world of unromantic hookups, casual BJs, and iPhone porn, but for satirizing New York's bourgeois bohemia.
  21. Reviewed by: Betsy Sharkey
    Dec 7, 2010
    70
    What the film does well is capture the confusion of the identity abyss of twentysomethings of a certain social class.
  22. Reviewed by: Noel Murray
    Dec 11, 2010
    67
    Tiny Furniture offers a 21st-century, East Coast spin on "The Graduate," but with comedy-writer-ish dialogue and a mannered style that never fully gels.
  23. Reviewed by: Roger Moore
    Mar 16, 2011
    63
    Lena Dunham's amusing meander through "post graduate delirium," a relationship comedy about nothing so much as the permanent relationships of family and New Yorker's relationship with space - and the lack of it.
  24. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Dec 10, 2010
    63
    In skewering the neuroses of New York bohemians, Durham has left us too little to care about.
  25. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    Dec 9, 2010
    63
    Dunham has been justly praised for her determination in getting Tiny Furniture made, but the movie itself has been overpraised as a result.
  26. Reviewed by: Joshua Rothkopf
    Dec 11, 2010
    60
    The funny thing? It all works reasonably well, especially if you have a yen for the urbane register of city kids and their amazingly cool parents.
  27. 60
    A small film about enormous fears.
  28. Reviewed by: Kirk Honeycutt
    Dec 11, 2010
    50
    How she (Dunham) made her movie is more impressive or at least unique than the actual story she chooses to tell.
  29. Reviewed by: J.R. Jones
    Dec 9, 2010
    50
    A tolerably warm bath of postcollegiate self-pity, salted with irony and self-mockery.
  30. Reviewed by: Rex Reed
    Dec 11, 2010
    0
    Lena Dunham makes a 98-minute home video seem like 98 days of hard labor.
User Score
4.8

Mixed or average reviews- based on 29 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 12
  2. Negative: 7 out of 12
  1. Jan 8, 2011
    2
    After reading several reviews, noticing the unusual amount of praise being heaped upon this film, I eagerly seized my first chance to see it.After reading several reviews, noticing the unusual amount of praise being heaped upon this film, I eagerly seized my first chance to see it. I can honestly say that I am flabbergasted that this film is being so well received. Instead of a being a movie that "... is full, assured and extremely wry." as Michael Phillips wrote, the film truly is a loathsome exercise in self indulgence.
    Lena Dunham's screenplay has all the bite and wit of an episode of "Days of Our Lives". When the rare occasion arises to show the audience a moment of true insight into the life of a frustrated youth stranded in post-grad limbo, it is dashed instantly by poor dialogue and unbelievable interactions with the director/stars actual family members. With all the independent films out there struggling to find an audience and distribution it is a shame to see this mess of a film reared its ugly head. A completely unsatisfying and frustrating 98 minutes.
    Full Review »
  2. Dec 16, 2010
    5
    After reading the reviews, I expected something more interesting. Although the camera work and editing were good, I found the characters hardAfter reading the reviews, I expected something more interesting. Although the camera work and editing were good, I found the characters hard to believe, even though the director/star's mother and sister played her mother and sister. Full Review »
  3. Dec 4, 2012
    0
    This movie had no theme, no motive and certainly no talent. The writing was dull and pointless and the acting was uncomfortable to watch. TheThis movie had no theme, no motive and certainly no talent. The writing was dull and pointless and the acting was uncomfortable to watch. The only good thing was the production design and since it was her mother's house you can't give Lena Dunham any credit for that. The most pointless movie I've probably ever seen. Full Review »