User Score
7.3

Generally favorable reviews- based on 56 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 46 out of 56
  2. Negative: 1 out of 56

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  1. Apr 23, 2014
    5
    Sadly, Tomorrow Never Dies is a jumbled mess of a Bond; probably the worst of the Brosnan lineup. The plot is so implausible to the point where it's almost not fun anymore, and Hatcher definitely doesn't add anything to the movie. The action scenes are so-so, but overall the movie is a flop.
  2. Jul 16, 2013
    6
    While it can have some entertaining action sequences, the story lacks- majorly. There are some good lines in there, but the film relies too much on action to make up for the lacking story, so it falls short. Plus, none of the characters are very memorable here...
  3. Jul 10, 2013
    6
    It's such a fun movie! So much great action and a bike and car chase! Pure Bondism. Watch this and feel the same thrills that went through my body when I watched this. The plot is over the top, but it's a Bond movie and damn good one.
  4. Aug 6, 2012
    10
    I wouldn't bother with the critic's ratings, but this had got to be one of the best action adventure movies ever, especially for a Bond movie. With seven non-stop action scenes and limited drama, this movie was a blasting thrill in 1997. No other action movie later than 1997 was as performing, predictable and as great as this one.
  5. May 22, 2011
    7
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. The eighteenth James Bond film, and second for Pierce Brosnan as 007. This is also the only Bond film directed by Roger Spottiswoode.

    When worldwide media magnate Elliot Carver (Jonathan Pryce) instigates international catastrophes across the world, so that his new media company will be the first to report the news, including the sinking of a British navel frigate in Vietnamese territorial waters, supposedly by the Chinese, but instead by his stealth ship, bringing the two superpowers to the brink of nuclear war. 007 must race against time to find out what Carver knows and is planning, before World War III breaks out. Along with Chinese agent Wai Lin (Michelle Yeoh), Bond must follow Carver to his headquarters in Vietnam in order to thwart his plan to monopolize the worldwide news market.

    Brosnan is perfect as usual as 007, and Michelle Yeoh is very good as his Chinese counterpart. Teri Hatcher is very sexy and displays a lot of chemistry with Brosnan as Carver's wife Paris, a former lover of Bond's, that got too close to him in the past, before he broke her heart. Jonathan Pryce is a strong main villain along with his henchman, Stamper (Gotz Otto, who is very much a throwback to Robert Shaw's Grant in "From Russia With Love"). All the regular supporting cast is back, Dame Judi Dench's "M", Samantha Bond as Miss Moneypenny, and Joe Don Baker reprising his role as amusing CIA agent Jack Wade. This film also includes a very amusing and memorable villain in Dr. Kaufman (Vincent Schiavelli), a world famous assassin that kills Paris Carver and brags to Bond about his prowess as a murderer and his hobby as a torturer.

    Overall, this is a very good follow-up to "GoldedEye", with exciting action sequences, and great characters.
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Metascore
56

Mixed or average reviews - based on 21 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 21
  2. Negative: 1 out of 21
  1. It's far from unenjoyable, but the dank shroud of the overfamiliar lies heavy over all, kind of like watching an Elvis concert circa 1976.
  2. 75
    There's a high gloss and some nice payoffs, but not quite as much humor as usual; Bond seems to be straying from his tongue-in-cheek origins into the realm of conventional techno-thrillers.
  3. Reviewed by: Tom Meek
    20
    Tomorrow Never Dies, like the commercial marketing assault the Bond cast has been involved in, is a hollow experience that's egregiously trumped up by its high energy glitz and gimmickry. Somewhere, in their rush to amaze and thrill, the filmmakers forgot about Bond, the man.