Videocracy Image
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60

Mixed or average reviews - based on 8 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: How can you explain what has happened to Italy in the age of its current prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi? Videocracy is director Erik Gandini’s critically-acclaimed inquiry into the mercenary underbelly of the high-glitz, low-politics, skin-baring media culture promulgated by Berlusconi’sHow can you explain what has happened to Italy in the age of its current prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi? Videocracy is director Erik Gandini’s critically-acclaimed inquiry into the mercenary underbelly of the high-glitz, low-politics, skin-baring media culture promulgated by Berlusconi’s ownership of the majority of the country’s television stations — a powerful tool in shaping public opinion to his financial and political benefit. Approaching the material as both insider and outsider, Gandini gains remarkable access to the opulent world of Berlusconi’s associates and the armies of willing wannabes that swarm around them, examining the key players (and their conflicted interests) and unveiling a modern Italy as both comedy and tragedy. (Lorber Films) Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 8
  2. Negative: 1 out of 8
  1. Stunning, eerily atmospheric.
  2. 91
    If a team of clever screenwriters tried to script a cautionary tale about the politics of fame (and the fame of politics), they likely couldn’t come up with anything odder or more apt than Erik Gandini’s documentary Videocracy.
  3. Given the stakes, it’s hard not to wish that Mr. Gandini had been more ambitious: at 85 minutes, Videocracy can only scratch the surface. Even so, after watching it, you realize that even a cursory look at Mr. Berlusconi is crucial to understanding an age in which celebrity is now the coin of the realm.
  4. 50
    Gandini makes it seem as if the nation of Dante and Fellini has been conquered by "Girls Gone Wild." As hyperbolic cases go, that's a pretty delicious one, but it's not quite true yet.
  5. Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi is an ideal documentary subject, but Erik Gandini's jumbled take on Berlusconi's corrupting influence quickly shifts from good idea to wasted opportunity.
  6. Reviewed by: Boyd Van Hoeij
    40
    Rather than presenting a well-argued expose of the disturbing symbiosis that exists between Italo politics and TV, with Prime Minister Berlusconi being only the most obvious connection, the scribe-helmer gets sidetracked by marginal characters while keeping bare facts to a minimum.
  7. Reviewed by: Ella Taylor
    30
    Videocracy is hopelessly infected with the very prurience it means to expose--again and again, Gandini returns to images of pretty women grinding away for the camera in hopes of scoring their 15 minutes.

See all 8 Critic Reviews