User Score
6.8

Generally favorable reviews- based on 4 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 4
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 4
  3. Negative: 1 out of 4
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  1. pangpong
    Jan 4, 2005
    10
    Good.
  2. LarryS.
    Nov 1, 2004
    0
    This movie comes on as a progressive film, and yet was funded by right-wing organizations. I don't appreciate this disingenious come-on. After about half an hour the film becomes carefully selected clips to promote the fairy tale of Iraqis dancing in the streets, welcoming U.S. occupation. After 450 hours of footage, all the editors could come up with is less than 1 hour of Iraqis This movie comes on as a progressive film, and yet was funded by right-wing organizations. I don't appreciate this disingenious come-on. After about half an hour the film becomes carefully selected clips to promote the fairy tale of Iraqis dancing in the streets, welcoming U.S. occupation. After 450 hours of footage, all the editors could come up with is less than 1 hour of Iraqis willing to smile to the camera and say everything is fine. I hope anyone viewing this will keep this in mind, along with who funded it. I'm just tired of propaganda, from wherever it comes. It is about as artistically satisfying as hearing John Ashcroft sing, but at least Ashcroft doesn't claim it wasn't him doing the singing. Expand
  3. TomM.
    Nov 5, 2004
    10
    Great movie that shows for once, the positive side of what America, American soldiers, and the Bush administration are giving to Iraqi's.
  4. ChrisB.
    Jun 28, 2005
    7
    I'm glad I saw this. It was heartening to see dozens Iraqis express such optimism and determination. I'd recommend the movie to anyone, along with "Control Room," "9/11" and pretty much any other documentary or reportage on America's roles in the post-9/11 world. Just make sure you have some idea of who made the movie and why. Given what we know about Armstrong Williams and I'm glad I saw this. It was heartening to see dozens Iraqis express such optimism and determination. I'd recommend the movie to anyone, along with "Control Room," "9/11" and pretty much any other documentary or reportage on America's roles in the post-9/11 world. Just make sure you have some idea of who made the movie and why. Given what we know about Armstrong Williams and Jeff Gannon, is it really so hard to believe that Bush administration or some arm of the US government was involved in shaping the message in "Voices of Iraq"? One IMDb user suggested this and got shouted down with comments like "Michael Moore something something something U.N. Oil-For-Food Program something something something anti-Bush liberal media bias." Come on, guys, if you want to talk about bias and undisclosed motivations, you've got to do more than call names. The PR firm for this movie has been under contract with the US Armed Forces. That may not be damning evidence of a connection, but it does seem interesting enough to check out. What I found suspicious was several Iraqis repeating the theory that democracy in Iraq would spread throughout the Middle East. That's not a harebrained pipe-dream, and it's possible that dozens or even millions of Iraqis believe it, but it's also strikingly similar to what the Bush administration is saying. It's similar enough at least to make me want to do a little more research. And what's up with, like, 95% of the people in the film saying that America's so great? Jeez, man, the U.S. gets even better ratings in Iraq than it gets here at home. Sure, it's plausible. Iraqis are right to thank the U.S. military for freeing them from Saddam's regime. The important questions here, though, are whether they ARE actually thanking the U.S. for this, and whether or not they THINK they're better off. Obviously, at least 50 people out of 20 or 30 million say they're better off. But a lot of them think that Saddam was great and the U.S. sucks. They may be wrong or even delusional, but you've at least got to put their comments in your "Voices of Iraq" film alongside the positive comments if you want to call it a real documentary. A survey conducted by Gallup in April 2004--the same time as the cameras were going around--found that the numbers of Iraqis who said the U.S. presence had improved their lives was about the same as those who said it hadn't. (Unless you're convinced that the Christian Science Monitor is a front for Michael Moore Inc., you may want to brush up on recent history at www.csmonitor.com/2004/0429/dailyUpdate.html). A film that includes those voices but explains why they're wrong is a documentary with a clear point of view. A film that leaves them out in a wildly disproportionate way is propaganda. Including only one or two complaints in a propumentary doesn't reflect reality, guys. Somebody had an agenda here. That's fine--it was Somebody's prerogative. I just wish Somebody had been more open about his own identity. "The People of Iraq" starred in this film. They probably did so at some risk to their lives. Bless them. But the producers and editors, presumably the ones who chose what interviews to include, were named "Drury," "Kunert," "Manes," "Robison," "Mark," and "Russell." Iraqis? Give me a friggin' break. Expand
Metascore
66

Generally favorable reviews - based on 10 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 10
  2. Negative: 1 out of 10
  1. Reviewed by: Joshua Land
    60
    It's certainly important for American leftists to consider that many Iraqis have benefited from the war that we oppose, but the omission of historical context here misrepresents the checkered history of American involvement in the region.
  2. The overall effect is scintillating and very engaging -- literally history in the making.
  3. Reviewed by: Dana Stevens
    80
    If this film cannot claim to represent the political "truth" about the war - what film could? - it certainly provides a broad glimpse of daily life in Iraq.